SaabCentral Forums banner
1 - 14 of 14 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
487 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Just spent the last hour fitting new grovved and cross drilled disks to my 91 turbo with lovely new pads. :D :D

Everything went smoothly and went to take it for test drive before doing the rears, started it and then found clutch pedal went straight to the floor :evil: :evil: :evil: :evil: No pressure what so ever

I assume it is the master cylinder. I am going to have a search but remeber Matthew did a huge write up with pics of changing clutch.

Is it worth doing this at the same time ? Is it such a monster of a job ?
Already have got a new clutch and release bearing waiting to be fitted but was a bit scared off as it looks a big job.

Do you think my diagnosis is correct ?

In the last couple of weeks it has had new rear springs and shocks, new recirc dump valve, new front brake discs, new front pads plus all silicon hose replaced. I have got new front shocks, clutch and release bearing, new rear discs and pads still to fit.

What more could go wrong ... actually I shouldnt say things like that. I assume it is just cause I am up to about 150K which is replacement time.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
487 Posts
Discussion Starter · #3 · (Edited)
What I did have is low brake fluid. I topped it up once i had done the brakes.

Would this affect the clutch?

Edit : Having just had a big search it looks like I may have to bleed the clutch. I cant see any fluid under the car although it maybe that my slave is leaking and hence the low brake fluid.

Anyhow I will try bleeding it tomorrow.

One quick (stupid) question, where is the bleed nipple for the slave cylinder ? Is it under all the intercooler pipework ?

Cheers
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
517 Posts
So you can't build pressure even when you pump the clutch? How did you bleed the brakes? I'm wondering if you popped a seal or something in the master or slave.

Yes, you'll need to disconnect the turbo plumbing to get to the bleed nipple on the slave. You may have to remove the plastic cover as well, which is not a fun job, at least on my '85. Matthew's excellent write-up and pics will be helpful for anyone who's doing clutch work.

I found replacing the clutch master pretty easy, once I took out the driver's seat to squirm under the dash. Good luck, sounds like you've been busy.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
487 Posts
Discussion Starter · #5 ·
I didnt end up bleeding the brakes. I was going to till this reared its head. So hopefully it is a case of the low brake fluid caused the clutch to drain and so bleeding it will solve it.

Rather than the likely the slave cylinder has gone so it caused the brake fluid to leak hence leaving no fluid for clutch !!!

I have got BBQ tomorrow and I dont think they will appreciate bits of intercooler lying around and me a grubby git so it is going to have to wait till monday.

Yeah I have seen Matthews write up. Thats what scared me :eek:
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
487 Posts
Discussion Starter · #6 ·
One more question.

If I was to go down the route of replacing the master and slave cylinder, is there a great difference between proper saab parts and alternative parts that PFS supply ?

The cost for the alternative is fairly good but the OS is £££'s
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
517 Posts
No reason to be scared. If you can read directions and have the tools, you can replace a Saab clutch. In other words, if a fumblefingers like me can pull it off, nearly anyone can.

If you weren't having clutch problems, I'd definitely try bleeding the system following the directions in Bentley or Matthew's post, or the dozens of others that are most likely in the archives here. I never had good luck bleeding from the bottom up (pressurizing from the bleed nipple) though it kind of worked. Introducing pressure from the brake fluid reservoir is the way to go, I think. There's just too much slop in the threads once you loosen the bleeder nipple.

I think I've seen people post about the UK equivalent of dub dub dub dot eeuroparts dot com. That's where I found nearly all my clutch parts (and I did a complete replacement of the system, including the hydraulic line) for very good prices. Perhaps something similar is available in your time zone?
 

·
Saab Mad
Joined
·
14,077 Posts
DanComden said:
Yes, you'll need to disconnect the turbo plumbing to get to the bleed nipple on the slave. You may have to remove the plastic cover as well
You do not need to remove anything in order to access the slave cylinder to bleed the clutch circuit.

The bleed nipple is shown in this photo, just above the yellow cap you can see bottom-right:


Slave cylinders often fail with no warning. On my car, the clutch was operating perfectly one day, yet the slave cylinder failed overnight - big puddle of fluid on the tarmac the following morning.

If the slave cylinder is leaking, you'll normally see a patch of fluid underneath the engine. There is a drain hole in the base of the clutch housing through fluid will leak.

As for clutch parts, well Saab didn't make their own. The clutch pressure plate and friction disc were made by Sachs. Master and slave cylinders were made by Lockheed. You can either buy Sachs and Lockheed parts in a Saab box, or in their own boxes for 1/2 price ;)

Any decent motor factors will be able to sell you a Sachs clutch kit and a Lockheed slave or master cylinder. Borg and Beck clutches are also fine.

If you do have to fit a new slave cylinder, then you must not over-extend the piston otherwise the seals will be fatally damaged. Then you'll have to do the whole job again, and just one more time if you're really unlucky.

__________________
Best Car Insurance | Auto Protection Today | FREE Trade-In Quote
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
487 Posts
Discussion Starter · #9 ·
I tried bleeding the clutch and no good.It is definitely Slave cylinder.

Unfortunately work has gone a bit mental and so I am going to take the easy way and get local specialist to fix it. I have been quoted £200 tops ( i have already got the bits)
Plus it looks like I will have to move house thus removing my car tinkering drive space

Shame I was quite keen to have a go. Maybe next time at 300K :D
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
154 Posts
Definitely bleed it. Same thing happened to me with my Lada a while ago (though it *does* have a leaky slave - and has had for the last two years). Got in one day (hadn't kept track of the fluid level for a while), went to put my foot on the clutch - and nearly broke my ankle as the pedal went straigh to the floor. Topping up the fluid and pumping didn't work. It has to be bled to get anywhere if air managed to get into the master cylinder.

The good thing about having a slightly leaky slave cylinder is that it becomes effectively "self-bleeding!" Have a spare cylinder sitting in the shed, but it hasn't got any worse in over a year, so I just keep track of the fluid and all is well.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,933 Posts
Remember - if it's the slave cylinder, you will have fluid on the ground under the front of the engine. If you don't, it is almost certainly the master. If you are losing fluid and it's not dripping out front, it might be seeping past the M/C pushrod seal inside the car under the carpet.


While neither the master nor slave cylinder is too hard to change, I think the M/C is easier!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
487 Posts
Discussion Starter · #12 ·
Righty ho.

Got my car back today with new clutch. Also got the garage to change alternator and water pump belts as they were squealing.

One thing that I thought i might pass on to help people.

Apparently what had happened in my car is that the rubber part of the hose that connects the Master & Slave cylinder had deterioated over time and got hard and crystalised. This had then got into the slave and worn away the seals. My slave was leaking like swiss cheese when it got there.

They said this was quite a common fault and that most home mechanics didnt know about this. Once the clutch was fitted and bled it forced more of the rubber up into the slave where it destroyed the seals. It is all to do with rubber breaking down over time.

They used to clamp the hose to stop this happening but it doesnt really work. The only fix is to change the hose (£50) at the same time as the clutch.

Hopefully this may be of some use to any of you having clutch problems
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
487 Posts
Discussion Starter · #14 ·
I got it all done at BPV in slough whom I trust implictly.

Sort of glad in the end that I didnt attempt otherwise I would have been pulling my hair out trying to bleed it.

Ahh well just happy to have proper forced induction back again on the road. It is amazing how much you appreciate the saabs after driving a 92 vauxhall cavalier 1.6 & Astra 1.7 Turbo diesel estate. :cool: :cool:
 
1 - 14 of 14 Posts
This is an older thread, you may not receive a response, and could be reviving an old thread. Please consider creating a new thread.
Top