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hi all,

my saab has had its first break down, it wont start. it turns over and has spark but i suspect no fuel. i dont hear the fuel pump when i turn the ignition on.

i have a couple questions

where is the fuel pump located in the ng900

does it have an inertia switch?

where would you start looking?


thanks

vince
 

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When the starter cranks the engine, the crankshaft position sensor (CPS) generates a signal to the ecu. If the CPS failed and there is no signal, the ecu will not send any fuel.

The fuel pump is on top of the fuel tank, under the passenger side rear seat. If you flip up the rear seat there will be an outline in the carpet above an access panel. With someone else cranking the engine, you should be able to hear it run from just above that spot.

You can test for pump voltage at the fuse, and at the wiring under the access panel.

Unfortunately, the panel is for inspection and access to the wiring, not for replacing the pump. To replace the fuel pump the fuel tank has to be removed.
 

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There are two relays in the fuel pump circuit - switch with another known good one.

About six months ago another man changed his pump by creating an access above the pump - he may have used a jig saw and a Dremel, easier than dropping the tank.
Napa, as well as eEuroParts carry the pump( $100 - $200)
 

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earthworm said:
About six months ago another man changed his pump by creating an access above the pump - he may have used a jig saw and a Dremel, easier than dropping the tank...
Best not to use power tools in that area, and he did point that out also. Most people have no way to make sure the tank is completely empty of fumes. He was good enough to leave directions online, I think this is what you are referring to?

http://www.cooliemail.com/saab-fuel-pump.html
 

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When the starter cranks the engine, the crankshaft position sensor (CPS) generates a signal to the ecu. If the CPS failed and there is no signal, the ecu will not send any fuel.

The fuel pump is on top of the fuel tank, under the passenger side rear seat. If you flip up the rear seat there will be an outline in the carpet above an access panel. With someone else cranking the engine, you should be able to hear it run from just above that spot.

You can test for pump voltage at the fuse, and at the wiring under the access panel.

Unfortunately, the panel is for inspection and access to the wiring, not for replacing the pump. To replace the fuel pump the fuel tank has to be removed.

In my old 1990 900i, the fuel pump was replaced by accessing the inside of the fuel tank from inside the car. The tank did not have to be removed... Is this the same for a 1998 900s Convert?
 

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In my old 1990 900i, the fuel pump was replaced by accessing the inside of the fuel tank from inside the car. The tank did not have to be removed... Is this the same for a 1998 900s Convert?
The older , true Saab design was more advanced;better vehicles have built in accesses.
Now, this is nothing but another nail.
 

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The older , true Saab design was more advanced;better vehicles have built in accesses.
Now, this is nothing but another nail.
Having an access hole leading to your gas tank isn't a better design. In a roll over, hard rear-end, or side collision, you run a VERY strong risk of fuel entering the cabin. If it ignites, you'll wish you hadn't cut it. Dropping a tank isn't that hard.

Jack the rear up, put jack stands under the frame; as high as you can get them. Put a floor jack with a small section of ply wood on the perch. Raise the jack until the plywood makes contact with the tank. Remove the straps, anything in the way, lower the tank carefully. Watch the lines, etc. Don't slide the tank around or move the jack. Remove the fuel pump, insert new one. The tank will go back up easier if it's didn't slide around. If the tank has a ton of fuel in it, have a friend help.

A smart idea is to put four wooden blocks at the corners of the plywood (the jack would be centered between them; adjusted for balancing)at the same height as the jack when lowered (4-6 inches high) as a safety measure. This way if the tank starts sliding, the blocks will level it if it falls and allow easy access to put the jack back under it's center. I've done several tank drops in various cars. It's not that bad. Usually the straps being rusted is the hardest part.

Only way I'd cut a hole is if a locking cover with a rubber seal was installed; the same way a fuel pump twists and locks into place. If that fuel leaks in your car while your awake and upside down, and your unable to move.... And the last thing anybody would want is having their family in the car being doused with gasoline. Cars that have holes were probably done to cut costs during production.
 
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