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Discussion Starter #1
So as for some us winter is around. I have yet to purchase new winter tires as my old ones are bald. So with my summer tires on yesterday, I couldn't make it up the hill the other day and I was beyond ashamed. I'm currently looking into buying the Hankook Icebear W300. Seems to be a good tire for the money.

What are other Saabers doing?
 

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Bridgestone Blizzak WS-50. Michelin X-Ice is also good.
 

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I got a set of Gislaved Nordfrost5's. I was originally looking for Nokian's, but they were outrageously expensive so the tire guy recommended these. They are apparently Swedish tires (although they are owned by Continental now).

Just had the first snowstorm of the year and they seem to work well. This is my first winter with the car and the first time I had winter tires so I can't really make a good comparison.
 

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Icebears are great and you'll love them!! I had them for my 92x and worked really well. Now they are on my mothers 92x and entering their 3rd year.

Cheers
Ken
 

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Hugh said:
MrBean;

Where did you buy your Gislaved Nord Frosts......size and price,too,if you don't mind?
Hugh,

I bought them at Steelcase in Markham. They are 215/55R16 with steel wheels. They came out to about $1000 taxes included.


Tim
 

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Discussion Starter #9
Ken's 9-3 said:
Icebears are great and you'll love them!! I had them for my 92x and worked really well. Now they are on my mothers 92x and entering their 3rd year.

Cheers
Ken
Nice. And for a price of 100$/tire (225/45/17) makes them even better!
 

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Winter tires should be done with "minus sizing" - if you normally run 17" wheels, get the snows in 16" (and corresponding steel wheels for them.) On snow, wide tires float on top eliminating much of their benefit.

Note also that many winter tires are Q or T speed rated. You can get H and V rated winter tires, but they are not as good in slippery conditions as others.
 

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i got continental ts810 (820?) after reading up on a number of consumer and car magazines where it regularly gained the best overall (combined) score.

winter tyres are tricky:
snow, rain, dry and a large temperature range with good grip in cold, but not too much wear when warm, good handling, economy etc...

so while other tyres often beat the TS810 in a single trait, unlike others it has consistently high ratings over all the different characteristics almost as good as the best tyre in the respective comparison concerning that single characteristic.

so while with approx. 250eur per tyre (370$US) a set costs a whopping 1000eur (1500$US) (or 800 if you get a good price :cool: ) i can only say:

my stopping, handling and economy are NOTICABLY better with the TS810 in winter, than with the pirellis pzero or continental sport contact 2 in summer! since i am a slow driver, with only 175hp, i really think that says a lot!

i really feel a lot safer in winter, believe it or not :eek:
 

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Discussion Starter #12
sbl said:
Winter tires should be done with "minus sizing" - if you normally run 17" wheels, get the snows in 16" (and corresponding steel wheels for them.) On snow, wide tires float on top eliminating much of their benefit.

Note also that many winter tires are Q or T speed rated. You can get H and V rated winter tires, but they are not as good in slippery conditions as others.
I agree on that. Though I don't run on my 17"s in summer so i pretty much use them in winter. My coming Icebears are V rated too. T

It was between the Icebear's or the Hankook W409 Winter i*Pike which are T rated. I like the extra power of the car in winter hence why I went with V rated tires:cheesy:
 
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sbl said:
Winter tires should be done with "minus sizing" - if you normally run 17" wheels, get the snows in 16" (and corresponding steel wheels for them.) On snow, wide tires float on top eliminating much of their benefit.
Going from a 17" wheel to a 16" does nothing for the width of the tire. The only benefit will be that there is less chance for snow to get packed into the wheels because of the higher sidewalls.
 

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Another thing to bear in mind when looking at winter tires is the depth of the sipes. I find that as a generality,the lower the tire price,the less sipe depth.

Some tires only have the sipes cut to half the tread depth while the better ones have them almost the full tread depth. This means the cheaper tire is next to useless as far as ice and packed snow traction is concerned after two winters in my area.......I speak from personal experience !
 

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Discussion Starter #16 (Edited)
I previously had Pirelli Snowsport 210, and on my 3rd winter, not only have the sipes disappeared, but the tread is completely gone. They are honestly as bald as a wooden table. And the price I paid for those was very very high. I just don't think I can justify paying more than double for a better name brand again. Now about the price, we all know Hankook, Toyo, Kumho, etc can't charge as much Michelin, Pirelli, and the bunch or else no one will buy them.
 

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Wulf said:
Going from a 17" wheel to a 16" does nothing for the width of the tire. The only benefit will be that there is less chance for snow to get packed into the wheels because of the higher sidewalls.
Um, yes it does. You end up getting a higher aspect ratio tire to make up for the diameter difference, which means narrower.
 

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I agree with Wulf. There is more to the picture than simply 16" is narrower than 17". The information below is pulled from National Tire's website.

http://www.nationaltire.com/basics/default.asp
I don't work there, just Googled tire ratings.

Tire Size Markings
The tire size shown below is P185/60R14 82H. The P represents the car type, Passenger. The 185 represents its section width (tire width in mm). The 60 is the tires Aspect Ratio (the ratio of the sidewall height to the tread width). The R represents radial tire construction. The 14 represents the rim/wheel size and 82H represents the load index and speed symbol.
 
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sbl said:
Um, yes it does. You end up getting a higher aspect ratio tire to make up for the diameter difference, which means narrower.
As kcaudell said, the diameter and width of a tire are not related. Usuallly, the smaller the diameter of a wheel, the smaller the width. This allows for mounting narrower tires.

My car has 215/55R16 tires on 16" 6.5" wheels. I could fit 17"-7" wheels and get 215/50R17 tires to keep the same diameter. So the diameter changes but the width of the tire stays the same. However, a better choice for these 7-7.5" wide 17" inch wheels are 225/45R17 tires.

My manual recommends 15" wheels with 195/65R15 tires for winter tires but I imagine I would need 6" wide wheels for those.

So yes, smaller diameter wheels usually are narrower allowing mounting of narrower tires. But changing the diameter of a wheel does not necessarily change the width of a tire.
 
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