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Now that the oil's been run low and the vehicle's been operated for however long with it in this condition (WTF is up with the father unit and his failure in keeping up with the maintenance on your ride, what with bolts missing and oil leaking and ****?!), it's possible that the hydraulic cam follower system has managed to trap some air and requires it to be bled off, which is what is causing the 'tapping' sound in the valve cover/top end.

Pop the valve cover and pack a bunch of shop towels/paper towels into the plug area (to help lesson the mess), then loosen the black bolt on the #5 intake camshaft bearing cap 3 or 4 turns, then replace the valve cover using just one top and one bottom bolt (again, it's just to keep the amount of mess down and to make it easier to access the area if subsequent bleeds are necessary...depends on just how much air has become trapped in the oil/lubrication system).

Now disconnect the harness from the ignition control module (mounted on the left-hand/drivers' side fender) and, first making sure that the car is in neutral, crank the starter for 15 seconds, wait 30 seconds, then crank for another 15 seconds, wait another 30, and then crank for another 15 seconds.

Now pop the valve cover back off and check for signs of oil having been forced through the #5 intake camshaft bearing cap bolt.

If you see clear evidence of oil, then torque the bolt back down to 11 ft-lbs./15 Nm and pull all of the paper/shop towels and clean up whatever spillage that might have occurred.

Thoroughly clean and replace the valve cover, making sure that the gasket surface is clean and free of debris (applying a thin layer of high-temp silicone sealer to it's surface to insure an airtight seal), and torque the valve cover bolts down to 11 ft-lbs./15 Nm following the tightening sequence.

Reconnect the the ignition control module harness and start the engine and allow to idle, the noise should go away within a few minutes...If not, wash, rinse and repeat, insuring that the proper oil level is maintained between attempts to alleviate the possibility of developing any addition air pockets in the system.

Oh, and I'm not Drew but...I sometimes play stand in for various members on tech issues, lol.





Taken from Trollhättan Bil's
post on Saablink.net

I need to know what #5 intake cam bearing cap is.


I'm trying to solve a valvetrain tick, and its possible air could be trapped in the hollowed out oil passage bolts. Just trying to bleed them...
 

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I need to know what #5 intake cam bearing cap is.

Let's list the key words and use deductive logic. "#5", "intake", "Cam", "Bearing", Cap".

"#5" - numeric value. falls between 4 and 6. Generally used sequentially.

"Intake" - Where stuff goes in to the engine.

"Cam" - roundy bit with eccentric bits on it that work the valves.

"Bearing" - a bit in which another bit spins.

"Cap" - a bit that contains another bit.

Things we can assume about ANY motor. Cylinders, bearing, etc... and always numbered sequentially from the front of the motor (Where the pulleys and what-not are" to the rear (where the transmission is mounted t).

The intake, well this should be fairly self explanatory. This is where the cold air goes in to the engine, if you need help figuring out which side is the intake, take your car for a quick blast down the highway at about 110mph for about 10 minuets. Immediately pull to the shoulder and pop the hood. Get out (Be sure to put the car out of gear and apply the parking break!) and firmly grab each manifold that is bolted to the engine. The one that does NOT leave 3rd degree burns on your hand is the intake. Get back in the car and drive to the hospital and get those burns treated.

After your burns have healed. Remove the valve cover. This will require first removing the torx screws holding it on. You can remove the cover without removing the screws first, but reassembly will require the use a a TIG-welder and is not recommended.

Now if you look, you will see two (I assuming were talking about a inline 4 cyl with dual overhead cams, if it's the V6 it's your fault for not mentioning it) you'll see two cams, these are the a fore mentioned "roundy bits with eccentric bits on them" You'll notice that the cams are not flopping about wildly nor held in place with magic or engine gnomes. They are in fact held in place with caps and that the caps are held in place with bolts.

You will also notice there are more then one "cap" holding the roundy bits with eccentric bits in place. Now remember back to kindergarten where you learned to count, start counting from the front of the engine to the back, start with one. Touch each cap as you count. When you get to "5" stop counting and don't move your finger. Look at which cap your pointing at.. This is the #5 bearing cap.

Now follow the instructions you posted.

Normaly I'm not this much of an ***, but I'm sorry. I thought this forum was for getting help, not getting others to do your thinking for you. ;oops:

Now here's some helpfull info that may not be able to be deduced from common sense.

There are two different bolts in each cap. One has a groove down the side of it. Do not mix them up. Take them out one at a time to be sure you have the proper one to "let bleed". The one with the groove is the proper one. Clean the bolt of any crap, etc before reinstalling. I believe it is the inboard bolt, don't quote me on this though.
 

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These are your cam bearings.

They are not like normal "ball bearings"

 
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