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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hey guys,

2007 9-3 Aero 2.8T.

My car is maintained religiously. Synthetic changes every 5k, recent 60k service etc. It seems every time I get an oil change my oil level is extremely low. The car doesn't have any leaks and seems to be burning a significant amount of oil. Any ideas or suggestions?
 

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Discussion Starter · #2 ·
Let the car rev for 10 min and saw a little white exhaust. Took it for a quick drive and revved again, no color to the exhaust whatsoever.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Oil is going somewhere, are the plugs fouled? Or were they?

White smoke, I think means head gasket.
Nothing coolant related is going on though. No coolant loss, overheating etc. Car runs flawlessly other than the fact that each time I'm due for an oil change I'm very low on oil.
 

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When you check the oil do you check it immediately after shutting off the engine or do you wait a while (20-30 mins)? Maybe the 2.8 is different but I found on my 2.0T that if I checked the oil immediately after shutting off the engine the oil pan would be dry! When I gave it 20-30 mins for everything to drain back to the oilpan (especially to drain back from the turbo) it would register a normal oil level.
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
Oil is definitely low, even had some check oil level lights. Changed oil today, I'll monitor it for the next few thousand KMs.
 

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White smoke is a good tell tell sign of a ball bearing turbo giving up the ghost. Some turbos last longer than others.

The 2.8 suffers heavier heatsoak so would take a small bit more abuse (though not huge) I suggest keeping an eye on it heavily fella, white smoke is the biggest tell tell.
 

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if your oil is disappearing and there is no obvious leak, then it is getting burnt off somewhere.

This is not good news, I would have it checked out asap!
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
I figured something was going on. I'm just confused as my car is still working flawlessly. The car shouldn't be blowing a turbo at its age and mileage especially at the way I drive it and maintain it. Pretty upset.
 

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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
I do have a mild tune, I used to get misfires and found oil on my plugs. Haven't felt any misfires lately but could that possibly be the problem?
 

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Discussion Starter · #15 ·
White Smoke = Coolant getting into the cylinders

Blue Smoke = Burning Oil

Black smoke = Running Rich
This is what I've always thought too. The white smoke was in very little quantities. I typed in Saab white smoke on YouTube and it was nothing close to that. It was very little and just seemed like cold weather exhaust. No blue smoke whatsoever.
 

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This is what I've always thought too. The white smoke was in very little quantities. I typed in Saab white smoke on YouTube and it was nothing close to that. It was very little and just seemed like cold weather exhaust. No blue smoke whatsoever.
Yes there is a big difference between actual white smoke and condensation...
 

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Get a compression test and do a compression test on all cylinders. That would show a bad head gasket (and likely leaking of coolant into the cylinder).
 

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Discussion Starter · #19 ·
Get a compression test and do a compression test on all cylinders. That would show a bad head gasket (and likely leaking of coolant into the cylinder).
Not losing any coolant, only oil.
 

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I agree with Lexxor about the turbo, especially since you're getting smoke as the car warms up, which would indicate that when the bearings in the turbo are cold they're letting oil through, this is from thesaabsite.com but refers to white smoke but should be blueish: "Beginning signs of Turbocharger failures can often be identified by noticing white smoke out of the tailpipe at idle. Severe failures will smoke continuously. White smoke indicates bearing failure causing oil to leak into the exhaust system. "
 
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