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Discussion Starter #1
Looking for advice on paint selection for my wheels.

I tried out a couple rattle cans. One paint is VHT polyurethane. VHT notes that their paint handles up to 250 degrees. The other is Rust-oleum, acrylic enamel, no heat rating noted.

With similar spray times and technique on my identical test scraps, the polyurethane went on very thin and ended up very hard in less than a day to dry. The acrylic enamel went on thicker and is a little softer, at least after a day. It may get harder over time as there's more paint thickness to dry. My experience is that Rust-oleum takes a week to get hard.

I think the Rust-oleum actually looks a little "fuller", but I didn't apply a second coat to either. There are also more top surface imperfections in the Rustoleum, but my spraying technique left a little to be desired for this test. Still, the thinner probably lays down a little nicer.

I'd think the Rust-oleum will cover surface imperfections in the wheels better, but might have its own to add. The VHT might show them, but would have minimal of its own. I don't think that I will be clearing over these as I don't want a gloss look and satin clear seems impossible to find in a rattle can.

Which would you pick for durability or other reasons? One thought is that the harder VHT will resist damage, but the other is that the harder VHT will chip instead of just taking the damage a softer paint would and staying in place.

Comments?
 

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wheel paint

hi perhaps your discussion answered your question for you. perhaps a further question you should ask/answer is how hard is each one to spray over? and how often do you want to touchup chips/damage? love that car.cheers
 

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I don't think I did answer my question, because I don't know that my assumptions about durability have any validity :confused:

Hoping for some practical experience or paint knowledge from someone... I don't have much of either.
 

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paint

hi, maybe I was a bit flip(flippant) with my response. what I didn't say is that you said the vht hardened and appeared to chip easily whereas the rust-oleum, a name I haven't heard for years and years(20-30+), appeared to take longer to harden and was softer. my view is that and I did say this-indirectly- is that the softer paint(rust-oleum) would be less maintenance as it appears it wouldn't chip/flake off as easily. there is a paint/compound applied to lower body panels so that stone chips are not as prevalent so it would appear that the rust-oleum, from your words, would be better overall-- hence my comment-"you answered your own question". also I'm lead to believe that the vht is better for protected areas. it really comes down to -- more maintenance-less maintenance, price, colour availability(assuming the paint is only available in a spray pack) and how long do you intend keeping the car/wheels. love that car.cheers
 

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Bob, by "surface imperfections" do you mean orange peel? I have never seen even a foo-can, yield imperfections. If you are getting spots of solid particulate mixed in, it sounds like a bad batch. Are you really cleaning the back of the rim or trying to spray with the tires still on the rim? Putting on a tack coat is usually a must with enamels or any paint, that will minimize the paint running to a point.
 

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Bob, by "surface imperfections" do you mean orange peel? I have never seen even a foo-can, yield imperfections. If you are getting spots of solid particulate mixed in, it sounds like a bad batch. Are you really cleaning the back of the rim or trying to spray with the tires still on the rim? Putting on a tack coat is usually a must with enamels or any paint, that will minimize the paint running to a point.
Little mountains maybe 1/64" high and in diameter. It may have been my prep... I confess to shoddy work for the test. I'll try to do a better one. I didn't spray a rim - this was just a test on some aluminum stock that I primed and painted... no sanding of the primer, etc. Rims are still out being sandblasted.

Meanwhile, after a few days of drying, it seems my gut feeling about hardness and chipping is probably right. The harder paint does chip more easily. It would probably need some coats of clear on top if if was going to hold up at all. Since I don't want high gloss, and since I haven't seen satin clear in a rattle can, I may go with the acrylic. More durable, the finish has more depth, and it works without clear.
 

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Somewhere, I had cans of satin clear. Did you try a body & paint auto supply shop. They at one point, make you a can of whatever you wanted and they may even sell wheel specific formulations.

My hat goes off to anyone who has the patience to do a wheel with all of the sanding of the spokes, indentations and features. Not just the sanding but just getting the spray down inside some areas without leaving an irregular granular surface from the over spray.
 

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Somewhere, I had cans of satin clear. Did you try a body & paint auto supply shop. They at one point, make you a can of whatever you wanted and they may even sell wheel specific formulations.
Not a bad idea... there is a body supply in reasonable driving distance. I will give them a call or drop by.

My hat goes off to anyone who has the patience to do a wheel with all of the sanding of the spokes, indentations and features. Not just the sanding but just getting the spray down inside some areas without leaving an irregular granular surface from the over spray.
Don't think I didn't think of that... and spend a LOT of time trying to find a good set of wheels so I could sell mine and just install something that doesn't need painting. Time is money and I lack both :-( Unfortunately, 17's in the right offset in good condition and within reasonable driving distance are elusive, so I finally gave up and decided to re-finish.

I even tried to find a shop to do the paint work but no one wanted to touch wheels i.e. "We're not set up to do wheels" and/or "it will peel and chip no matter what and we won't do them" or "try one of the wheel restorers". FWIW, the wheel restorers I found wanted $175 to $190 to do the wheels (complete with lathe turning). Nice work, but I could have new factory wheels shipped in from Europe for not much more.

As for the labor, these are double-Y wheels, so intricate areas are minimal. Paint sanding should be easy. I found someone to sandblast them for a reasonable price. They really need it as the reason for painting is that the paint is flaking off big time on the rear/inside of them and the alloy is badly corroded there. There's no way to stick weights to them anymore (no lip on these for weights on the front. Worse yet is what I found in the beads - any place there was curb rash on the front side, the corrosion had crept into the bead and they need cleaning up. Must have been a bad day at the Saab paint shop when these were done.
 
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