SaabCentral Forums banner
1 - 11 of 11 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
894 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
so I have a '99 9-3 2.0L Turbo

setting up to do the head retorque and thought I'd also replace the spark plugs.........

did the research, found out I should be using NGK plugs........

went to the local auto store, plenty of different NGK plugs there........

looking through the book, but the book has nothing for a '99 9-3 2.0L Turbo

from this photo of the catalogue, which spark plugs should I be getting?
 

Attachments

·
Registered
Joined
·
894 Posts
Discussion Starter · #4 ·
i meant from the pic that I posted, since those are the only ones available to me.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
894 Posts
Discussion Starter · #6 ·
soooooooooooooooo what do I buy?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,161 Posts
Yeah, I had a problem figuring this out - mainly because the available spark plugs seem to be different in Canada than elsewhere. I gave up on the catalog, looked at the plugs on the rack and tried to find something as close to BCPR7ES-11 as possible, I ended up with BCPR6somethingorother and they seemed to work OK. The important thing is to get the 'R' in there so BCPR6xxx, BCPR7xxx are all OK I guess.

I've since replaced these with PFR7H-10's from autopartsway.ca (at vast expense) but I can't say I notice a difference.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
894 Posts
Discussion Starter · #9 ·
Yeah, I had a problem figuring this out - mainly because the available spark plugs seem to be different in Canada than elsewhere. I gave up on the catalog, looked at the plugs on the rack and tried to find something as close to BCPR7ES-11 as possible, I ended up with BCPR6somethingorother and they seemed to work OK. The important thing is to get the 'R' in there so BCPR6xxx, BCPR7xxx are all OK I guess.

I've since replaced these with PFR7H-10's from autopartsway.ca (at vast expense) but I can't say I notice a difference.
hey! I'm from Richmond Hill as well!!! ;ol;

I found the exact plug as per recommendation on the NGK website for this engine.....

for anyone in Canada if you can not find these plugs at your local auto parts store (I tried, Canadian Tire, PartSource and Napa..) go to your local Honda dealer.





they were $3.30 each at the dealer. Since the dealer can not look up these things by manufacturer part number you have to tell them which honda these plugs are for. These are the same plugs as in a '89 Honda CRX SI.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
427 Posts
Just for your information, the -11 after the plug number (BCPR7ES-11) only refers to what the plug is pre-gapped at. In this case, it's 1.1mm

I've found that my car really appreciates a gap of around .038 - .040 inches, which is about .96mm - 1.01mm (Yours may be different, of course.)

It's usually easier to just find a BCPR7ES plug and gap it to whatever you want yourself. I've found that places will stock that, but NOT the -11 plug.

Also, don't forget the anti-seize and dielectric grease!

Just my 2 cents.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
427 Posts
Yeah, I had a problem figuring this out - mainly because the available spark plugs seem to be different in Canada than elsewhere. I gave up on the catalog, looked at the plugs on the rack and tried to find something as close to BCPR7ES-11 as possible, I ended up with BCPR6somethingorother and they seemed to work OK. The important thing is to get the 'R' in there so BCPR6xxx, BCPR7xxx are all OK I guess.

I've since replaced these with PFR7H-10's from autopartsway.ca (at vast expense) but I can't say I notice a difference.
Well it is important to make sure the R is in there (which stands for resistor type spark plug) it's also important to get the right heat range plug which is denoted by that 7 or 6 number that you referenced. The OEM plug for the Saab engine is a 7.

You can tell what is specifically right for your engine by 'reading' the plug that you remove. You want to look at the ground strap (the curved thing that you 'gap' away from the center electrode.)

Looking at the discoloration of the ground strap, and where the discoloration begins will tell you whether or not you have the correct temperature plug.

Too cold of a plug, and the discoloration will end really close to the center electrode. This means the ground strap is loosing heat too quickly and is not able to burn off deposits as efficiently.

Just right, and the discoloration will be right in the middle, between the end and where it connects near the threads. This means that it's the correct temperature plug.

Too hot of plugs, and the discoloration will extend closer to where the the ground strap meets the threads. This can cause pre-ignition since the strap may be hot enough to ignite the fuel/air mixture without an actual spark.

Now, you don't have to be exactly in the middle, and probably never will be, but close is best.

The best way I've found for reading them is to drive about a mile or so, then stop, and as quickly as possible, pull the plug out.

There are other ways of reading them which involve looking at the plug and the porcelain and seeing how sooty it is, etc. Here's a link for that:

http://www.ngksparkplugs.com/tech_support/spark_plugs/faqs/faqread.asp
 
1 - 11 of 11 Posts
Top