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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hello Friends.

I am new to Saab and I thought I would try to get the 411 on what my experience would/should/could be like in the coming years. So feel free to add your 2 cents.

I am 24. Just moved out to L.A. from Chicago. This is my first Saab. The only other car I have owned was a 97 Chevy Blazer. I loved it. I just got a new 2008, 93 2.0 I am about 300 miles in and so far so good. I plan on filling up with mid grade. Getting that oil changed every 3k and getting her washed every few weeks.

Some random questions I have.
Anything I should worry about driving in L.A. besides traffic? In Chicago it was salt and pot holes.

There is a faint whine when I start my car. Almost like it is powering up. Should I worry?

Should I use any certain oil?

What matience should I keep in mind over these first few months?

Anything else you can all add would be super. Thanks in advance.:lol:
 

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Most of us use at least 90/91 Octane in thee 2.0T. Although there are a few options, Mobil 1 fully Synth is the Oil of the majority. Maintainence, You might just bring it in to a dealer for a checkup after a few K. Then all the normal stuff.

As for driving in L.A....just keep the CHP's with the lights on out of your mirrors.;)
 

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Congrats on your purchase and welcome to saabcentral. Now you need to get some pics up before we start answering your questions!!:D
 

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Mobil 1 0w-40, and change it when your oil life monitor tells you to change it, not every 3k. There are better things to spend money on in L.A. than an expensive oil change every 2-3 months.
 

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Faint whine is normal.
 

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Congratulations. You should get free maintanance for 3 years / 36 K.

I agree that 3 K is too short for oil changes, not sure what the 2008 recommendation is, but in 2004 they recommended 15 K between changes. If free changes are every 10K, you could pay for a change between them.
Look on this forum for oil analysis, you'll see that full synthetic holds up pretty well.

Bryan
 
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Bluffbagwell said:
Anything I should worry about driving in L.A. besides traffic? In Chicago it was salt and pot holes.
Watch out for drunk and stoned celebrities...

Also, watch out for motorcycles splitting lanes in traffic. Some of them ride quite fast. It's actually quite a thrill to split lanes when traffic is moving along at a good speed. The bigger the bike, the more of a balancing act it becomes. Not that I have ever done that of course.. For some reason, drivers in Michigan get quite pissed when I do that here..

Either way, traffic will get to you sooner or later so take a deep breath and relax.
 

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Do not wait until your monitor says to change your oil. Whoever just posted that should never post again. Change your oil as frequently as you want.
Use Synthetic oil 0w30 or 0w40 is good.
On turbo applicated vehicles they say when starting, let the vehicle Idle, what this does, it warms up the oil and lubricates the turbo before you go "bat out of hell" and cause premature ware. Even on shutdown you should wait 3 minutes (give or take) to let the turbo "cool down" instead of shutting it off right away, starving the turbo of lubrication while it cools.

Also for fuel use the higher grade fuel, its all about how the car burns it. the injectors like the better fuel. Using cheaper fuel in these cars will eventually give problems down the road.

Congrats on the new saab and hope you enjoy it :)
 

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michaLcoughliN said:
Do not wait until your monitor says to change your oil. Whoever just posted that should never post again. Change your oil as frequently as you want.
Use Synthetic oil 0w30 or 0w40 is good.
On turbo applicated vehicles they say when starting, let the vehicle Idle, what this does, it warms up the oil and lubricates the turbo before you go "bat out of hell" and cause premature ware. Even on shutdown you should wait 3 minutes (give or take) to let the turbo "cool down" instead of shutting it off right away, starving the turbo of lubrication while it cools.

Also for fuel use the higher grade fuel, its all about how the car burns it. the injectors like the better fuel. Using cheaper fuel in these cars will eventually give problems down the road.

Congrats on the new saab and hope you enjoy it :)
I'm sorry, but it's posts like this that just add to the confusion and mis-information for new owners. I'm not starting yet another oil change thread, but to suggest that Warren should never post again just because you happen to disagree and know better that Saab, GM and all those who have done oil analysis on their cars is somewhat rich...:nono;

Oil change intervals are like religion around here (to quote ctrlz). Everyone has a view on what is right. At the end of the day, I agree, you do what you think is right. It's your car, your money. But to suggest that following the manufacturer's recommended intervals is so wrong that a poster should not be allowed to post again is just not on.

These are modern, engines using high tech oils. 10, 15 and even 20K oil change intervals have been around for years and years in Europe. We stopped changing our oil every 3,000 miles in the 1970's, so they are nothing new. There are also several owners on here who have 100,000 miles + on their 9-3's who have only changed the oil when the SID tells them to from day one. So far, I know of not one Saab EcotecII that has failed due to excessive wear attributed to too infrequent oil changes. If you care to do a search on this forum there is enough reading material on oil analysis to keep you going for a month... Okay, enough on OCI's :eek:

Secondly, it is not necessary to keep the engine running for several minutes after a run to allow the turbo to spool down. This may have been true in the days before water cooled turbos, synthetic oil and smaller lighter turbo chargers, but in the Saab it is not necessary. Water cooling and sythetic oil prevents coking of the bearing surfaces due to heat (which was the major problem in older applications when the oil supply was removed). Furthermore, your turbo only really spins during acceleration, so unless you come off the highway on full boost and straight to a stop, the turbo will most likely be idling as you pull up. Modern, low intertia turbos also spin down faster than the older, larger type (it's what helps to reduce turbo lag). I'd say leaving the engine idling for anything over 10 seconds even after a hard run is overkill.

And if you don't believe me, you can always search on here for more answers...
 

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JBob said:
These are modern, engines using high tech oils. 10, 15 and even 20K oil change intervals have been around for years and years in Europe. We stopped changing our oil every 3,000 miles in the 1970's, so they are nothing new.
Perhaps this is why the B204/B235 sludging was first identified in Scandanavian markets?


Secondly, it is not necessary to keep the engine running for several minutes after a run to allow the turbo to spool down. This may have been true in the days before water cooled turbos, synthetic oil and smaller lighter turbo chargers, but in the Saab it is not necessary. Water cooling and sythetic oil prevents coking of the bearing surfaces due to heat (which was the major problem in older applications when the oil supply was removed).
This is mostly true.

Furthermore, your turbo only really spins during acceleration, so unless you come off the highway on full boost and straight to a stop, the turbo will most likely be idling as you pull up.
Unfortunately, this is just flat wrong. Your turbo continues to spin even after acceleration, which is the entire point of having a recirculating boost valve, which reroutes the residual boost in the intake piping after the throttle body closes. If not, then the boost can't escape and slams back against the rapidly spinning turbo blades and you get compressor surge...which is not fun and will wear out your turbo.

Modern, low intertia turbos also spin down faster than the older, larger type (it's what helps to reduce turbo lag). I'd say leaving the engine idling for anything over 10 seconds even after a hard run is overkill.
Agreed on the first part, and somewhat on the second, but I'd certainly let the turbo go for 20-30 seconds after a hard run. No, it's not a return to the old days of letting an oil-cooled turbo cool down, but it's definitely worthwhile after a hard run.
 

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mike saunders said:
Unfortunately, this is just flat wrong. Your turbo continues to spin even after acceleration, which is the entire point of having a recirculating boost valve, which reroutes the residual boost in the intake piping after the throttle body closes. If not, then the boost can't escape and slams back against the rapidly spinning turbo blades and you get compressor surge...which is not fun and will wear out your turbo.
Sorry Mike, I disagree, it's not flat wrong, but perhaps I should reword what I meant. Sure, anything spinning at 180,000 rpm will take some time to spin down to a stop. What I meant was that in most circumstances before you park up the engine is at lower rpm and hence the turbo is already spinning down - whether it be moving up the driveway, driving into a parking space etc, the engine is unlikely to be on boost immediately before switch off.

This, combined with sythetic oil and water cooling means that it isn't normally necessary to leave the engine idling for several minutes after a run.
 

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michaLcoughliN said:
Do not wait until your monitor says to change your oil. Whoever just posted that should never post again. Change your oil as frequently as you want.
Use Synthetic oil 0w30 or 0w40 is good.
On turbo applicated vehicles they say when starting, let the vehicle Idle, what this does, it warms up the oil and lubricates the turbo before you go "bat out of hell" and cause premature ware. Even on shutdown you should wait 3 minutes (give or take) to let the turbo "cool down" instead of shutting it off right away, starving the turbo of lubrication while it cools.

Also for fuel use the higher grade fuel, its all about how the car burns it. the injectors like the better fuel. Using cheaper fuel in these cars will eventually give problems down the road.

Congrats on the new saab and hope you enjoy it :)
He didn't seem to know that Saab's oil change intervals are much longer than 3k miles. He asked for advice, I gave it. I don't want him wasting his money. Saab doesn't spend millions of dollars to develop these cars and the complex algorithms that govern them for no reason.




oops I just posted!
 

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Bluffbagwell;

I suggest that you spend some time reading the Owner's Handbook and the Warranty and Maintenance booklet.....and I'm not trying to give you a hard time !!....just some advice.

You will find things like;
a) max oil change interval is 10K miles or 12 months unless your specific driving experience causes the oil monitor algorithm to show an earlier interval on the SID.( Nothing says you can't do it earlier if you want to).
b)Saab specifies full synthetic oil meeting the GM-LL-A-025 specification in either 0W-30 or 0W-40. (Mobil 1 in 0W-40 seems to be commonest full synthetic widely available in US and Canada that meets this spec).
c)Failure to comply with service interval or oil specification results in---"Saab does not accept any liability for damage that might occur due to neglecting to meet these requirements".
d)Unless you are towing,putting a load on the engine such as prolonged mountain driving or driving at sustained very high speeds,87 octane gas is perfectly acceptable.However you will see a little better performance and slightly better gas mileage with higher octane ratings. (Whether or not you want to spend the extra money for high octanes for around town driving is up to you,but if you use 87 at any time and get signs of knocking,move up a grade).

Enjoy your Saab;it's a driver's car par excellence.:D
 

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Well Me personally dealing with Heavy Duty equipment. AKA Large Trucks.
It states that any vehicle / truck with a turbo should follow the same process on shutdown. Also stated in your SAAB owners manual, I checked mine today for the hell of it. And it states the 3 min start up idle and shutdown process.

I dont really need to use the "search" feature here.

Im not trying to have a pissing match im just going by what I have been trained in my "trade" as a 310T Truck and Coach techinican / Heavy equipment.

Start up and shut down procedures are actually critical to a Turbo. My 2 cents.
 

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Even when it comes to fuel, the manual has a broad spectrum although it wil "run" on anything detween 87 and 93, Saab recommends hgigher grades...this from P. 128:

Only use fuel from a well-known oil com-
pany.
All Saab gasoline engines can be driven on
gasoline with an octane rating between
AON87–93.

The engine management system monitors
the combustion and automatically adapts to
the fuel used.
Always use the correct grade of fuel:
unleaded AON87–93.

For optimum performance Saab recom-
mends:
• 2.0t engine 175 hp – AON90.
• 2.0 Turbo engine 210 hp - AON93.


Sometimes, gasoline can contain a number
of additives containing oxygen. The most
common of these are alcohol or some type
of ether. The maximum oxygen level is
restricted by national regulations.
If fuel containing a mixture of alcohol is
used, the maximum levels approved by
Saab are: 5% by volume of methanol; or
10% by volume of ethanol. The most
common type of ether used is MTBE
(methyl tertiary butyl ether), of which fuel
may contain a maximum of 15% by volume.
....Snip

Lets not even Start on Oil;)
 

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Michalcoughlin:

The current manuals state----"Allow the engine to idle for about 10 seconds.Do not apply full throttle for at least 3 minutes after starting".

Current manuals also make no mention of need to idle before shut down.
 

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JonV;

Things have changed a bit since 2003 re fuels.Current manual now recommends use of AON 90 for optimum performance in 2.0T gasoline engine.

Saab now bans the use of any fuel containing methanol. Saab also recommends not using fuel containing MMT. There is no mention of MTBE.
 

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Good correction Hugh. Aso, we know they've lowered the OC Interval on the later models. But we with the earlier models (same engine/same oil) were never given a note on that change. I would think they did the reduction in miles for a very good reason.
 

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Discussion Starter · #20 ·
WoW guys. Thanks to all for the tremendous responses.

No worries about the disagreement on oil. What I have taken away from that is that I need to use the correct oil and pay attention to my car.

Other than that I will keep rocking the midgrade unless i start putting mad highway miles on Charlotte(my cars name) then maybe I'll kick it up.

I will be sure to check back in you guys have been a great help.

Random thing. For some reason when I get out of my car I can only lock the doors with the remote. Trying to lock it with the button inside doesnt work. Its not really a big deal I was just wondering why that is happening? Saftey feature of some sort?
 
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