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Greetings,

I am completely new to Saabs but have always admired their styling and drove a 97 900 for a week back in the mid 90, and just became a happy owner of a 98 900SE Turbo.
I love everything about her but there are some issues that I would like to resolve so I thought I’d ask for expert advice here.
The pre-sale check up revealed:
-used front brakes and rotors,
-worn water pump,
-broken side transmission mount and a hole in the central muffler. I already passed the smog so the hole is the least of my worries. I hope to tackle the brakes. Are there any issues I need to be aware of before I start this ? How difficult is the water pump/trans mount job for a newbie like myself?
I am somewhat mechanically inclined – I built an engine for my 74 Honda CB550 – but I know there will be surprises I didn't expect.
As I am awaiting my Haynes manual I thought I'd ask some painfully basic questions.
Is it possible to do the water pump/trans mount with a set of socket wrenches, pliers, vise grips etc. or do I need to get other tools as well. I took a good look in the engine compartment and everything is packed tight in there and I noticed there are “star” type bolts on the engine which I have never seen before. Any other special tools I should get to be able to service her myself ?

And finally, while cleaning the engine and surveying the area I managed to bake off the little vent that comes out of the larger nipple in the valve cover. Is this a breather of some sort ? where does the small tube lead to end up ? I’d like to replace the hose as it hardened quite badly. I ran a brass tube through the broken vent and glued this together, and hope that the smaller diameter won't constrict anything before I get a replacement.
Thanks in advance for any advice and tips.
Kind regards
Tomasz
 

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Tomasz

I replaced my water pump this weekend.. Relatively easy to do.

You have to move the power steering pump to one side and remove the air box to give you access.

The pump is fixed into position using 3 bolts with a torq/star head. (2 at the top, 1 at the bottom) Its really important you get the right size as they will be quite tight, using the wrong size will mean you may strip head, an then you won't be able to get the bolts out. I partially stripped them (with a T30)..oops, before I did too much damage I went and got the correct size, which is T40.

I finally got them off and replaced the pump and used normal bolts to reattach so i could use my socket/spanner set.

Took about 2.5 hours to get off, about 40 mins to put it all back to together again!

The Haynes manual will tell you how do it clearly, although i didn't move the Boost Control Valve to make room to remove the pump.

Good luck

Joe
 

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What does it mean when that paper say "Used Front Brakes and Rotors"? I just replaced my front pads and rotors this weekend, nothing surprising about it. Start by removing the wheel, then you pull the 'floating' part of the caliper by pulling the two hex (8mm I believe) bolts out that face the engine (small dust cover's off first). Once you have those off, carefully retract the caliper, once you have enough space the pads and caliper will pull off forward, do not disconnect the brake line! just support the caliper (can wrap a length of wire around the caliper to the spring, or do as I did and just set it on a paint can). You're getting close now. Next step is to pull the caliper bracket off of the wheel hub, it's attached with two 10mm hex bolts, those were a bit tough to get out, but once you have the two hex out, pull that bracket off. Now you're left with just the retaining bolt, I believe it is either a 5mm or a 5.5mm hex, get that off and the rotor should come free. Installation is reverse of taking apart, except before you put the floating part of the caliper back on, retract the piston all the way and put the new pads in. The rest is the same, put everything back together. Then wait a week or so before seasoning the rotors/bedding the pads.

When I did the job I used the standard L-shaped hex keys that I had, after doing that, I would recommend purchasing the 10mm hex socket, that was the physically hardest to remove, everything else should be easy enought with the L-shaped hexes. I would also recommend getting a good set of Torx sockets as JoeUK has stated for everything else in the car, they have been quite the lifesaver for me.
 
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