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Discussion Starter #1
Thanks for all the help so far everyone.

With the help from some of the posts here I was successfully able to remove my old fuel pump this morning. Lots of patience, silicone spray, a piece of wood shaped to fit the tabs of the retaining ring and a breaker bar and it finally came out of the car.

Question 1:
Now that I have the whole assembly out of the car I am wondering if that lower line that installs at the very bottom of the basket just pulls out? I don't want to break anything considering how careful and slow I was getting the thing out. Or do I just unsnap the 4 retaining clips on the basket and keep that bottom hose connected?

Question 2:
I have decided to go with the Walbro insert as opposed to the Professional Parts Sweden (PPS) assembly due to the questionable reliability of the ProParts assembly. A shame.... it would be so much easier to go that route.

Am I correct to assume that the OEM strainer/filter in the basket is NOT to be reused? And instead you use one of those press-on filter "bags" ?
If so, does someone have a recommendation on one of those press-on filters? (the eEuroparts kit does not include this item which makes me question if I should be some how reusing the OEM strainer/filter).


Question 3:
The Walbro kit comes with a bushing that I think installs on the top lid. Is this secure enough to hold the pump in place or is something more required to keep it in place?

Any other tips - greatly appreciated!!!

I am taking lots of pictures and plan to make a nice how-to write-up on the procedure using that kit but I want to make sure I myself know what is the CORRECT way of retrofitting one of these Walbro (now TI Automotive) kits to an OEM basket.
 

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You don't break anything and you reuse everything. The bottom hose connected to the basket twists and then pulls out. Keep the rubber vibration bushes immersed in gas or they go hard and you will never get them on. The really difficult bit is reattaching the nylon tube.
It all goes back together exactly how it came apart.

This link may help you; http://www.saabcentral.com/forums/showthread.php?t=119759
 

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Discussion Starter #3 (Edited)
Thanks PEVA

Yes the plastic lines are more flexible than they appear.

I was able to get the pump cartridge out and it wasn't what I was expecting.

My car is a 1990 900 Turbo Convertible produced in February of 1990.

My car has the single pump system (not the dual feed pump nonsense).. I believe 1990 was the first year the 900 saw the newer style pump.

The pump is OEM and has never been replaced (at least that I'm aware, and certainly looks like everything has been there given the factory style hose clamps on the tiny hose piece between the pump and the plastic line.) It certainly hasn't been touched since I purchased the car in 2005 with 88K miles.

Turns out I have a Walbro pump cartridge. The pump itself has a check valve in it. It has a single barb (not 3 barbs like I was expecting). The eEuroparts kit uses the 3-barb pump cartridge which I think is skinnier and longer and also uses different hose size. (8mm - 1 barb vs. 6mm - 3 barb ...I think)

The pump has these numbers on it:
WALBRO (LOGO)
4018891
34989-3
A0S005A
PAT. NO 4500270

This might be a really stupid question but why couldn't I just buy a Walbro pump with the #4500270 stamped on it? That is the only # that matches in one's I see for sale. The other numbers above it are different. So I don't know if the numbers above the "PAT. NO" refer to specific applications are if something is actually different about the pump. The one's available for sale are showing 46psi but I have no idea what ours is supposed to be.

When I punch that # into google I see a lot of Ford vehicles and even a Jeep no mention of Saab. It is described as universal.

It looks identical in the pictures though. Looks like it would fit beautifully and I wouldn't have to modify the basket or strainer.
 

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Discussion Starter #4
I should also mention my car does not have the "TEE" like I see in everyone else's photos. My pump outlet goes directly to the top of the fuel pump lid outlet. The pump barb connects to a little (very little like 3" piece) of rubber fuel line with a SS Ear style clamp, which connects to the hard plastic line with another SS Ear style clamp. That hard plastic line goes directly to the top of the fuel pump lid outlet.
 

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I am taking lots of pictures and plan to make a nice how-to write-up on the procedure using that kit but I want to make sure I myself know what is the CORRECT way of retrofitting one of these Walbro (now TI Automotive) kits to an OEM basket.
EAGERLY anticipated - thank you in advance!
 

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Discussion Starter #6 (Edited)
EAGERLY anticipated - thank you in advance!

No problem.

I'm very glad I didn't order the parts first only to discover everything is wrong.

eEuro has a disclaimer on their website to visually check before ordering (despite saying that it fits my vehicle) that the Walbro cartridge kit they offer [SAAB Fuel Pump Kit - TI Automotive 5CA3360] is 6mm and 3-barb style. Now, from what I've read, people have made that work with some modification but it's less than ideal in my opinion (doesn't fit well and needs additional parts) and I'm really trying to go back as close to factory as possible.

One important note is that in 1990 (and possibly other years but for sure in 1990) Saab used two different set ups with the new-at-the-time single feed fuel pump assembly. So in 1990 we all got the new style but there were two variations of that new style. I have the Walbro 8mm single barb variation.

I ordered a Walbro that looks identical and has the same Walbro part# on it that is supposedly for a New Old Stock 1988-1997 Mustang/Taurus SHO vehicles. Price was cheap and I'm willing to try it.

Too bad I missed the New Old Stock SAAB Walbro cartridge unit that was for sale a couple days ago on ebay from Germany which had all the right numbers on it. My luck my car died the day after that auction ended.
 

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Discussion Starter #7 (Edited)
So the Walbro fuel pump from the 1988-1997 FORD vehicles (Mustang/Taurus SHO/Etc...) arrived today from ebay purchase. New check valve o-rings and main fuel pump o-ring that I ordered in separately from eEuroparts also arrived today. The Swedish ABA stainless steel fuel injection clamps and 5/16" Gates high pressure submersible fuel line arrived yesterday. I also ordered the fuel pump removal/installation tool from eEuro for $30 (so worth it). This meant that it was time to give the Ford fuel pump experiment a try.

I nervously opened the box to compare the new pump to my dead pump. I was shocked to see it was 99% the same. 8mm, single barb, internal check valve present in the pump itself. Over all dimensions identical. The only difference was at the very bottom... the pickup area looks slightly different and all the numbers were different except for the Walbro PAT. No. 4500270 which was the same on both.

Now about that "4500270" number... I've seen that number on other pumps which DO NOT look the same as the original SAAB one so one must be careful when going by part# alone. Best to see a photo of it.

Finding a replacement pump cartridge only meant I didn't have to mess with check valves or modify the basket, strainer or bushings (other than fit new o-rings - a pain for sure). I remember Jim Mesthene saying that all the o-rings should be changed so I did it right.

The special fuel pump ring tool was great for reinstalling. I had fashioned a piece of wood which did work (barely) to remove it so I could see which pump I actually had.

The check valves go back in much easier than they come out which was nice.

Reconnected the negative lead to the battery and it was time to turn the key and see what happens. It was a bit like turning a key on a car on the Wheel-Of-Fortune or something... will it start?

About 7 seconds of cranking and she came to life. SUCCESS!! I checked for leaks, none. I revved engine, all seemed well. Shut the car off and let it sit for a while. About an hour later went to restart and she fired right up. Took the car out for a drive on the highway and my previous hesitation problem in 3rd and 4th under hard acceleration are gone. I had always thought that was the APC limiter working but obviously it was a failing fuel pump (by the way, that hesitation had been around for at least a couple of years). With this new fuel pump there is zero hesitation under hard acceleration and I revved up to 5500rpms going up a hill. Could not make it hesitate no matter what I tried.

Now, the only "problem" .... and it could be in my head ... is I am detecting the slightest miss at idle every few seconds or so. It is very slight. It may have been there before and I just hadn't noticed it. It might be normal for all I know. Could there be anything about this new "incorrect" fuel pump that would cause the slightest miss at idle?


MY ORIGINAL OEM PUMP:
The pump has these numbers on it in this order:
WALBRO (LOGO)
4018891
34989-3
A0S005A
PAT. NO 4500270

NOTES: 8MM, SINGLE BARB, HAS INTERNAL CHECK VALVE

******************************************************************
THE REPLACEMENT "FORD VEHICLES" PUMP I USED:
AC DELCO BOX MARKINGS:
AC DELCO PART# EP361
GM# 25165941
0377C1
OTHER# 037700609

MARKINGS ON PUMP ITSELF IN THIS ORDER
WALBRO (LOGO)
521
01701
PAT. NO 4500270

NOTES: 8MM, SINGLE BARB, HAS INTERNAL CHECK VALVE


I can't find specific information on the box or in specs but I believe this replacement pump has an output of 46 Psi 18gph.
 

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Discussion Starter #8 (Edited)
For cars 1990 and after, which have the newer style single fuel feed pump assembly, there appears to be two or three (or more) possible variations.

From what I can gather, there are three Walbro pump styles:

6mm barb, 3-barb fitting, (I'm not 100% certain but I don't think this pump has a check valve internal to the pump). I think this is most common pump.

8mm barb, 1-barb fitting, (this is my pump and it DOES have internal check valve.) I think this pump is less common.

10mm barb, not sure of number of barbs on fitting, (not sure if it has internal check valve or not). I think this pump is very rare.

If you find yourself with the 8mm, 1-barb fitting, with internal check valve... like myself... you will also find that no one sells a direct replacement pump (as of 06-05-16 anyway). eEuro does sell the 6mm pump but it requires significant modification to the basket/strainer, hoses, and I think also check valves (which means you have to tackle the hard plastic lines and factory crimping - no fun at all).

I decided to give the FORD VEHICLES ACDELCO # EP361 Walbro pump a try which has the same Walbro PAT No. 4500270 stamped onto the pump itself. Here is the steps I took. This is not intended as a guide and you should always seek out a professional for your own repairs. This is simply a recount of what steps I took on my own car.

OTHER NOTES: In my research I think I found a Borg Warner replacement pump (looks to be a Walbro in a Borg Warner box) with Borg Warner part# P193E (there was a reference to 1989 Saab which could make sense with my 02/1990 produced 900 Turbo. So if you can't find the AC Delco you might could find a new old stock Borg Warner replacement.


1. I prepared area. After all, I am dealing with highly flammable gasoline here so I made sure the workspace was clean, I had a fire extinguisher near by, and that I was using only LED lights and kept the area free of ignition sources.

2. Since my car decided to start up I pulled fuse 30 for the fuel pump and let it stall to depressurize the system, took only a few seconds.

3. Then I removed negative battery terminal and secured lead away from terminal (10mm wrench)

4. Removed spare tire and spare tire holder (convertible, 19MM socket or included lug wrench)

5. My car is fitted with a CD changer, I removed CD changer from it's bracket on the underside of the cargo lid and set it down in lower cargo area

6. I then removed 2 torx screws and remove trunk floor (torx T20)

7. Next I removed silver "coffee can" style lid (simply pried up)

8. I vacuumed dirt and debris from pump area taking care around check valves and lines

9. I removed torx screw for plastic check valve hold down retaining piece and set aside (torx T20)

10. I unplugged fuel pump power connector and set aside towards rear of car

11. Next I sprayed silicone spray around retaining ring and into check valve inlet and outlets and let sit for a while

12. Now I gingerly began making slight twists on each check valve being sure to grip the check valve at the center only. Eventually I began to get more movement in the twisting action. Twisting clockwise a bit, then twisting counter clockwise a bit. After a few minutes of this it will feel more loose. This is where I started to pry upward. I started to get some upward movement so I grabbed the Saab included pliers in the tool kit and very gently used some leverage by placing my hand on the trunk floor and prying straight upward slightly while continuing the slight twisting action.
Eventually they both came out and I wrapped them and set them aside. There was enough slack in the lines to just tuck them out of the way towards the rear of the car.

13. Now it was time for real fun, the dreaded retaining ring. First I noted the orientation marking and took more pictures in case I forgot where it went. Since I was trying to figure out what I had to deal with (since Saab decided to use two different variations of fuel pumps for my model year)

I didn't yet have the special removal tool. I've seen people make a tool out of some flat iron pieces (bending them to fit the tabs). I thought I'd give a piece of scrap wood a try. I placed the board in the general area and traced
a cut out for the check valve inlet/outlets which protrude upward and notched it out to clear those. Then I sanded the corners until the board firmly fit inside the tabs of the ring. Then I drilled a large hole in the center of the board large enough for my breaker bar handle to fit through. I thought the board was going to crack in half but it didn't and after some effort the ring began to turn (counter clockwise).

Note: I went ahead and ordered the special tool ($29) as I didn't know if my board would work for reinstalling as the edges were well worn from me fighting to get the ring off. It's a one-time use kind of improvisation.

14. Before removing ring completely, I again cleaned the area as sand and grit starts to come out of the threads as I unscrewed the ring.

15. Now the fuel pump assembly was ready to lift out. I had a small container nearby to set it in when it came out. I brought it upward and tilted it slightly to let it drain. I had to angle it a bit to persuade it out completely. It was mostly drained but I did manage some how not to spill a drop in the car.

16. I placed a piece of wood over the tank hole and used a towel above the wood to keep fumes from escaping while I went to work on the pump basket assembly.

17. Now it was time to remove the pump cartridge from the assembly and see what Saab decided to give my car.

18. I removed the wire terminals from the pump cartridge and the plug connector from the pump lid and set it aside (taking note of positive/negative). Note: my plug has a tab so it can only go back one way.

19. Then I unsnapped the 4 basket retaining clips and more silicone spray all around the upper bushing/isolator. With some persuasion the bushing released from the pump. I don't know if this is true or not but I was told that I should keep the bushing submersed in gasoline to keep it pliable. So I set it in a small container of gasoline. Couldn't hurt I figured. I was very careful with this delicate part as it is no longer available and very hard to find used. I was also careful/gentle with everything but the plastic lines were somewhat flexible during my handling of the basket and cartridge removal.

20. All that was holding the pump at this point was the fuel hose. The clamps are the small SS "Ear" style clamps (aka pinch clamps). I removed one with a screwdriver but that went rougher than I liked so I decided to remove the second clamp with a dremel after the residual fuel had completely evaporated. The area is cramped and I was trying not to break anything.

21. This is where I discovered I have the single barb (8mm) Walbro pump. Also I noted that my pump unit did not have the SAAB "Tee" fitting that I had seen in so many other photos. This particular pump also has a built-in check-valve which I could hear when I shook the pump.

22. After doing lots of research and discovering that eEuro didn't have the correct pump for my car and that my OEM pump has long been discontinued I decided to try a FORD Walbro pump which had the same main part# stamped on it.

I ordered in the folowing parts:

New (old stock) AC DELCO PART# EP361 WALBRO PAT. NO. 4500270 fuel pump. - EBAY
New check valve o-rings (OEQ part# 7974546, quantity 4) - EEUROPARTS
New large fuel pump to tank o-ring (TI Automotive part# 4160511, quantity 1) - EEUROPARTS
New fuel pump removal/installation tool (eEuro CTA 3700 part# 8394462, quantity 1) - EEUROPARTS
New Gates 27093 5/16" Submersible 100 PSI SAE J30R10 Fuel Line (to replace existing 2" piece) - AMAZON.COM
New ABA Fuel Injection Hose Clamps (part# AB21014, quantity 2) - Cap Hardware Supply via AMAZON.COM
New Super Lube 92003 Silicone Lubricating Grease 3 oz Tube for o-ring lubrication - AMAZON.COM

23. While waiting for new parts to arrive I cleaned out the basket bottom which had some rubber bits and debris and the strainer screen which was remarkably clean for the 25+ years it had been down there.

24. Parts arrived. I compared replacement fuel pump with OEM and it was very similar, same size, same barb (8mm, single barb), and it had the internal check valve which I could hear when I shook the pump.

I decided to give it a go with the FORD EP361 pump. I mounted the fuel pump in it's strainer screen (making sure to note positive and negative before installing upper bushing), then into the basket and fitted the upper bushing mount. Sliced a piece of the high pressure submersible hose
to replace the small piece that I had removed from the old pump. I didn't want to reuse the 25 year old hose though it did look OK but the clamps would never fit over the previous clamp impressions correctly anyway. Silicone spray helped slip the new piece of hose onto the pump and the plastic line to the pump lid. That plastic SAAB line had a brass nipple end insert in the plastic by the way so it made it easy to push into the new hose.
I decided to use Sweden ABA Stainless Steel fuel injection hose clamps ($$$) rather than the cheap worm gear replacements that came with the pump. I just didn't trust the worm gear ones. Reconnected the plug under the pump lid and connected the leads to the pump itself, then double checked positive/negative orientation.

25. Now it was time to replace the old o-rings on the check valves. I made sure I had something blocking the opening in the gas tank since I didn't want to lose an o-ring inside the tank. The o-rings are somewhat difficult to get off but even harder to get back on new ones. Patience helped. I lubricated the o-rings with the Silicone Grease With the help of a dental pick and a tiny screwdriver I finally carefully got them on.

26. Next I fitted the large fuel pump o-ring into the recess of the tank opening. I lubricated the oring with the Silicon Grease.

27. Now it was time to place the pump back into the tank. This was done at slight angle and twisting motion. I realigned the the pump taking note of the original orientation from a photo I took before removing.
(NOTE: I didn't know if orientation matters but I had read that someone did have a performance problem due to improper orientation. Something to do with siphoning effect if I recall correctly. So I chose to go back with exactly how it was when removed.)

28. I sprayed the retaining ring with silicone spray and reinstalled by hand and then used the special tool (CTA 3700) to tighten down, also noting the original orientation of the ring before removal so I knew it was to proper tightness.

29. Then I reinstalled the check valves by pressing straight down on the center of the check valve. The first o-ring seated then pushed a little harder and the second one seated. Did this for both.

30. Re-plugged fuel pump power connector plug.

31. Reinstalled plastic check valve hold down retaining piece with torx screw (T20)

32. Reconnected negative battery lead (10mm)

33. Cranked car for about 7 seconds, successful start! Checked for leaks, none! Test drove, all seemed fine.

34. Upon return, checked again for leaks, none. Reinstalled foam piece around pump. Reinstalled "coffee can" style lid over pump. Reinstalled trunk floor. Reinstalled CD changer. Reinstalled Spare Tire (after checking PSI which was low, filled to proper PSI).
 

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The pump has these numbers on it:
WALBRO (LOGO)
4018891
34989-3
A0S005A
PAT. NO 4500270
I have the same pump in a 1991 model that I believe is OEM, above the patent number it says "08790-1", so 90 is possibly the year (in your case 89 for a 1990 car).
Does anyone know how to decode a Walbro date stamp?
And I'm now replacing it with a Delphi FE0489-12B1, but I found that also has a Walbro in the box:
TTP 467 AJ
233 18 2MB
 
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