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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hi, everyone, i've just bought a 2000my Viggen convertible, unmodified, after having a 900 V6 for the last 7 years and being very happy with it. Well, you know how you treat a car with kid gloves when you first have it, and I was pleased enough with the Viggen after a couple of hundred miles, when I found myself on a long incline which I have driven many cars up, and I thought i'd just open her up in third gear, when, whoah! I felt this huge grin coming on! I've never driven anything like it, and am now so thrilled that i've bought it, but I want to make sure I harness the power, not go through a set of tyres every month!
I am considering an Abbott rack brace to help with torque steer, but I wonder if a 6-point subframe brace would be worth fitting to lessen the scuttle shake and rattles etc, and of course I would like to know if it is worth fitting both, or if there is one modification you know of which you consider the most effective?
cheers
Paul
 

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Well right now I have on the way the steering rack brace from GS. Most everyone seems to recommend that and the upgraded anti-sway bar as the first mods. Then go with the 6-point, and different mounts, and springs, and etc etc.
 

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The rescue kit is first, the larger rear arb and the sterring rack brace, that is the first step, then after that, the springs and shocks are next on the list to really help the handling and get the CG lower.

After that its 6pt subframe brace and upper brace and then larger brakes and then more power and then larger turbo and the list goes on and on;)

Welcome to the fun world of modding your Saab,

JZW
 

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I have a base 2000 vert. I have installed the 6pt brace, then anti roll bar and steering brace. I must say the car handles waaaay better. I can take corners much quicker and with little or no tire squeel, and thats on all seasons, i plan on getting summers soon. Allthough you will want to watch your ground clearance with the 6pt brace if you are on bumpy roads like me, i have found myself bottoming it more often.
 

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I have a base 2000 vert. I have installed the 6pt brace, then anti roll bar and steering brace. I must say the car handles waaaay better. I can take corners much quicker and with little or no tire squeel, and thats on all seasons, i plan on getting summers soon. Allthough you will want to watch your ground clearance with the 6pt brace if you are on bumpy roads like me, i have found myself bottoming it more often.
Is your car lowered? Or are your springs or shocks weak ? On a base model there's a lot of clearance to where the brace would be. Of course, if you're dropping that much, it's saving your fragile oil pan from destruction.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
viggen

the car is all standard, but the springs seem OK, I believe the Abbott Racing Rescue kit includes a 2-point subframe brace, and wondered if the 6-point brace might be better, or does it just do the same job? As regards low clearance, I had an Alfa Spider, 1975my, for many years, and I know about low ground clearance!
 

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the car is all standard, but the springs seem OK, I believe the Abbott Racing Rescue kit includes a 2-point subframe brace, and wondered if the 6-point brace might be better, or does it just do the same job? As regards low clearance, I had an Alfa Spider, 1975my, for many years, and I know about low ground clearance!
I think we have mixed threads here... I was responding to the guy who was bottoming out his base 2000... that said, I would get a six point brace. It gives yo a lot more structure than a 2 pt brace can. You can get one in the UK from Sophie: http://www.ebay.com/itm/SAAB-BRACE-...arts_Vehicles_CarParts_SM&hash=item3f0c8a663f
 

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get nice tires and rear sway bar.
 

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Definitely the ARB and steering rack brace first. I found the poly bushings really good too - not only are they firmer than stock but on a MY2000 car the existing bushings are probably pretty beat-up and in need of replacement.

I just got my Quaife installed and that makes a huge difference but it's probably the most expensive of all the 9-3 handling upgrades so definitely not a first step.
 

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No point putting uprated parts on your car unless you have sorted out the existing worn ones - I'll guess that the car has around 100k miles on it and that the shocks are original? If so they will be well past their best and replacing these should be your first step ( assuming you have some non budget performance orientated tyres?) Then add steering rack clamp and brace and 6 point subframe brace. The Viggen springs are pretty stiff and it also has an extra strong internal rear ARB so once you have some good shocks on there like Bilstein B6's a rear ARB may not be needed and infact it may well destroy some ride quality on a flexible vert chassis. ARB's increase spring rate which may lessen roll but if the shocks are worn it will decrease grip and control as the shocks become even less effective.
 

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No point putting uprated parts on your car unless you have sorted out the existing worn ones - I'll guess that the car has around 100k miles on it and that the shocks are original? If so they will be well past their best and replacing these should be your first step ( assuming you have some non budget performance orientated tyres?) Then add steering rack clamp and brace and 6 point subframe brace. The Viggen springs are pretty stiff and it also has an extra strong internal rear ARB so once you have some good shocks on there like Bilstein B6's a rear ARB may not be needed and infact it may well destroy some ride quality on a flexible vert chassis. ARB's increase spring rate which may lessen roll but if the shocks are worn it will decrease grip and control as the shocks become even less effective.
I'd agree with you on everything except the ARB effectively decreasing spring rate. I don't see how the Saab torsion axle design would pick up that effect. "Balance" the spring rate across the body perhaps, but not decrease it.
 

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I'd agree with you on everything except the ARB effectively decreasing spring rate. I don't see how the Saab torsion axle design would pick up that effect. "Balance" the spring rate across the body perhaps, but not decrease it.
I said it increases the spring rate;) - to elaborate it increases it on the spring which is on the outside of a turn as all ARB's do inc on the semi trailing torsion system that the NG900/9-3 uses.
 

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I said it increases the spring rate;) - to elaborate it increases it on the spring which is on the outside of a turn as all ARB's do inc on the semi trailing torsion system that the NG900/9-3 uses.

OK, I'm prpobably nitpicking but the spring rate is the same, it's the load on each that is varying. But, I think you meant the same thing from the other direction.
 

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OK, I'm prpobably nitpicking but the spring rate is the same, it's the load on each that is varying. But, I think you meant the same thing from the other direction.
The ARB is a spring and adding to the force excerted by the spring to the unsprung mass ie the axle / wheel and increasing the total spring rate on that corner but also loading the spring on the inner corner. It's basicaly resisting the flexing of the axle which may be a good thing for handling on perfectly smooth surfaces but in the real world where the car has to ride slight undulations all the time it is reducing the isolation / independence of each rear wheel so any disturbance of one wheel is transfered to the other and unless properly damped by effective shock absorbers will actualy reduce grip and create a twitchy unforgiving rear end sensation. I'm running a stock ARB on my car as the Aero springs are already pretty stiff and more spring rate creates an unresponsive dead feel to the rear. Even though it will corner flatter and turn in faster with the uprated item it feels more responsive and predictable once you are in the turn with the stock bar.
 

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The ARB is a spring and adding to the force excerted by the spring to the unsprung mass ie the axle / wheel and increasing the total spring rate on that corner but also loading the spring on the inner corner. It's basicaly resisting the flexing of the axle which may be a good thing for handling on perfectly smooth surfaces but in the real world where the car has to ride slight undulations all the time it is reducing the isolation / independence of each rear wheel so any disturbance of one wheel is transfered to the other and unless properly damped by effective shock absorbers will actualy reduce grip and create a twitchy unforgiving rear end sensation. I'm running a stock ARB on my car as the Aero springs are already pretty stiff and more spring rate creates an unresponsive dead feel to the rear. Even though it will corner flatter and turn in faster with the uprated item it feels more responsive and predictable once you are in the turn with the stock bar.
I could agree with all that. I'd probbaly consider the ARB more of a lever than a spring, but if/when it bends, it becomes a spring.

Do you have adjustable Koni's? I find that tweaking the front to damp a little more is necessary with an upgraded bar. When you damp the rear motion via the upgraded ARB some of the force that would normally transfer to the rear gets transferred back to the front. It makes the front a little bouncy but with added damping in front it works well.
 
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