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Discussion Starter #1
Hello all,
On my '99 9-5 Wagon w/ 2.3, is there supposed to be a vacuum pump at the end of the cylinder head just like my '01 9-3 SE? I know the 2.3 is a b & s 2.0. Here is what's in the 9-5 now. If there isn't supposed to be one in the 9-5, any thoughts on stopping the leak? I was thinking of machining a cover plate.

Also, here is a link to the videos about the car:

Thoughts on the big end con rod bearings would be appreciated.
Have an exceptional day,
Thanks :D

thethere e
269073
 

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Discussion Starter #3 (Edited)
I do have an automatic bob3000, so I should have one but don't ? Someone must have removed it and plugged it. UGH Although I just took a look at it and it looks like it has an electric vacuum pump. There is something right in front of the battery that looks to be a vacuum pump. it looks as though there are vac lines running to it.

Additionally, do you know where the plastic line connects that comes out of the top of the auto trans? I can't seem to find its opposite end. It looks like it should terminate someplace around the brake booster though.

269078

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According to the EPC '99 was the crossover year for the electric pump > cam-driven. The port leaks because the rubber disc gets brittle and shrinks a bit with age. Replacement discs are cheap but apparently there is great commitment and resolve required to change them. Cam cover comes off easily but the disc is held in by a bridge-shaped retainer. My tech broke several torx bits trying to unscrew it.
 

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In your pics, the blue NRV looks suspiciously like the ones in the evap. pipes from the control valve to the TB and the cobra. These have a high failure rate. Unlike the evaporator. pipe, that NRV doesn't look as if its heat-shrunk into the pipes. That being the case I'd undo it for a suck/blow test.
 

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Discussion Starter #7 (Edited)
According to the EPC '99 was the crossover year for the electric pump > cam-driven. The port leaks because the rubber disc gets brittle and shrinks a bit with age. Replacement discs are cheap but apparently there is great commitment and resolve required to change them. Cam cover comes off easily but the disc is held in by a bridge-shaped retainer. My tech broke several torx bits trying to unscrew it.
Thanks Doug :D So it is electric vac pump, I'll just machine a small cover and seal it up

Right now I am trying to get her back together, and make sure all the internals are good. I am debating about new big end con rod bearings, just need to measure all the journals. the con rods are a bit loose. Just a few more things to get back together to make sure she's a good runner, then I'll do all the other maintenance type things.

If you want to see the "loose" con rods, and have any input, its in the playlist I posted in the original post probably 2nd or third video.

Thanks again Doug, it is greatly appreciated :D
 

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"Replacement discs are cheap but apparently there is great commitment and resolve required to change them. Cam cover comes off easily but the disc is held in by a bridge-shaped retainer. My tech broke several torx bits trying to unscrew it."

That's because you should not try to take those torx screws out to change the plug. you just pound it through into the valve train, pull it out and then pound the new one in. There is a reason there are "security" torx screws there, that is don't take them out!

To really understand if your big-end rod bearings are good you need to plastigauge them and measure the clearance. But if they are loose the clearance is probably already too big. As long as the crank hasn't been damaged change the bearings, they're reasonably cheap and you can do them (and the main bearings) with the engine still in the car.
 

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Discussion Starter #9
"Replacement discs are cheap but apparently there is great commitment and resolve required to change them. Cam cover comes off easily but the disc is held in by a bridge-shaped retainer. My tech broke several torx bits trying to unscrew it."

That's because you should not try to take those torx screws out to change the plug. you just pound it through into the valve train, pull it out and then pound the new one in. There is a reason there are "security" torx screws there, that is don't take them out!

To really understand if your big-end rod bearings are good you need to plastigauge them and measure the clearance. But if they are loose the clearance is probably already too big. As long as the crank hasn't been damaged change the bearings, they're reasonably cheap and you can do them (and the main bearings) with the engine still in the car.
I did plastigage them and they are within spec.. I'm trying to figure out now if there is a thread or WIS out there that explains how to roll in a new timing chain. Well I shall give that a try when I get the plug. I'm pretty sure I ordered the right part for that. Probably shouldn't be removed because it will cause bigger leaks.
 

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I know there is a thread in here somewhere about rolling in the timing chain. I remember reading it a while back. The upside is that you don't have to take the timing cover off. Teh downside is that the timing chain is the only thing you change and if you have weak guides or a worn balance chain you're still in for a big job.
 

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Discussion Starter #11
I know there is a thread in here somewhere about rolling in the timing chain. I remember reading it a while back. The upside is that you don't have to take the timing cover off. Teh downside is that the timing chain is the only thing you change and if you have weak guides or a worn balance chain you're still in for a big job.
I was reading a few threads where they said the chain doesn't stretch too much. I ordered a new timing tensioner as the chain and gears looked good. I know the guides are a downside to the timing system on this engine. I think I shall skip a new chain. If you are interested in a video series on the subject I have a YouTube playlist of my adventures on the whole affair. Here is a link to the playlist:


As for those balance shafts, I deleted the chain because I thought that was what the culprit of the horrible noise was. I even machined the shaft chan tensioner and plugged the hole the right way. If any of you need that service done I can accomplish that for any of you. But alas the noise was still present upon reassembly. That is why I am going new tensioner, as it is a cheap part to replace and I can put it back together to diagnose the symptoms easier. In a perfect world I would have a four post lift in the garage and just drop the eng/trans out the bottom. LOL Have an exceptional day :D
 

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I have a good used tensioner, although I don't think that will be your issue. It's a pretty simple device that really has no mode in which it "wears"

PM me if you are interested in one of the used ones. you can have it for the shipping cost. the little plastic plunger is missing but you should be able to re-use the one from your existing tensioner.

the chain does stretch and if the tensioner is measuring over 15mm from shoulder to the base of the head you need to replace your chain.
 

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If you don't have a vacuum pump there is a plug in the block that has a rubber molded seal around the outside. If you need to replace it it's simple. Take the valve cover off, use a socket that is just about the same size as the plug to pound the plug "into" the head, when it comes loose pick it up and throw it away. Coat the new one with oil and use the same socket to pound it into the hole until it seats.

easy peasy. DO NOT try to take the tori bolts out, they are in there for good!
 

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Discussion Starter #16
If you don't have a vacuum pump there is a plug in the block that has a rubber molded seal around the outside. If you need to replace it it's simple. Take the valve cover off, use a socket that is just about the same size as the plug to pound the plug "into" the head, when it comes loose pick it up and throw it away. Coat the new one with oil and use the same socket to pound it into the hole until it seats.

easy peasy. DO NOT try to take the tori bolts out, they are in there for good!
Thanks unclemiltie, I replaced it with ease. Probably the easiest thing on a vehicle I have ever fixed lol
 
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