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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I have a 1994 900se 2.5 non turbo and I am having a hard time finding the PCV valve to check it. If there is anyone who has had this issue and can help, I would greatly appreciate it.
 

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gthomp0805 said:
I have a 1994 900se 2.5 non turbo and I am having a hard time finding the PCV valve to check it. If there is anyone who has had this issue and can help, I would greatly appreciate it.
Look for any tube connected to the valve cover(s), then follow the hose to the inline checkvalve. That's the actual PCV on these cars. They aren't like other cars that have a PCV on the end.

Per eeuroparts... "Part Description:
(9189564) PCV check valve for any 85-93 16v, 86-98 9000, 9-3 all, 9-5 V6 all. This genuine valve has the p/n "9189564" and the words "made in Germany" inscribed in the plastic. The inner diaphragm is red, and the outer casing is marked with a green dot. The Scantech version has none of these markings and contains a black diaphram. Scantech valves have their p/n 51.1313 inscribed on the housing. Part Description:
(9189564) PCV check valve for any 85-93 16v, 86-98 9000, 9-3 all, 9-5 V6 all. This genuine valve has the p/n "9189564" and the words "made in Germany" inscribed in the plastic. The inner diaphragm is red, and the outer casing is marked with a green dot. The Scantech version has none of these markings and contains a black diaphram. Scantech valves have their p/n 51.1313 inscribed on the housing. "

http://eeuroparts.com/productdetail.aspx?searchResults=1&code=5550

 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
I must be looking at this with one eye closed. I practically had the top of the engine apart last weekend and did not see anything that resembled a hose from the valve covers. Not that I doubt you. Well I have off all next week and a heated garage so I will attempt this again. Thanks again to earthworm for assisting with the repost and to you for this very detailed layout of info.
 

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I don't think there is a PCV valve on the V6 N/A; the crank case vents through an oil separator at the end of head #1 a small hose goes upto the underside of the inlet manifold and a fat hose goes to somewhere near the throttle body; there are no check valves in the circuit.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Maybe this will shed some light. From what I have seen under the hood, there are several hoses to and from the throttle body. I have had the intake manifold off at least a dozen times (thank god its not that tough) and have not had a need or seen any hoses underneath to disconnect. There is a large hose from the IAC valve to the trottle body. There are two smaller hoses coming off the back and underneath of the throttle body. One goes to the fuel pressure regulator and one to what appears to be an electronic check valve that is mounted on the inside wheel fender and then that continues on into the fire wall which I was told was the charcoal canister/breather. There is also a third port off of the throttle body underneath that is capped. What brought all this to my attention was when I removed the hose from the FPR there was no vacuum so that's when I decided to see if the check valve was clogged. I followed the other end of the hose from the FPR to the throttle body and discovered it was hooked up to the port with no vacuum, but the other 2 ports are producing vacuum. So I capped the port with no vacuum and connected the FPR to one that was capped and producing but it made very little difference in the engine performance. Thats where I stand now.
 

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Parts suppliers do make misteaks.

The V6 must have a crank vent system; evidently is must be as Ragtop describes; there MAY be no check valve; there may be no need of one due to the design...trust GM to come up with something off-beat, strange ,and quirky(sound familar ??)

A port at the throttle body with no vacuum ?
This must be a uncontrolled port for air from someplace..
Common sense tells me that the FPR must have a vacuum power source; which it now seems to have..
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
All stand by. I am going to look again over the weekend and send pics. Maybe that will make all of this a bit easier since no one has pics of a V6 non-turbo (leave it to me to have the rarest bird of all)to share, perhaps I can help others as well. Thanks.
 

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gthomp0805 said:
All stand by. I am going to look again over the weekend and send pics. Maybe that will make all of this a bit easier since no one has pics of a V6 non-turbo
Should have looked around this forum a little harder...

Link

Link

link

And going through those threads has made me certain that there is no check valve. As for your blocked pipe it is not uncommon for the old oily detritus from crank venting to block the small holes.
 

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I don't think there is a PCV valve on the V6 N/A; the crank case vents through an oil separator at the end of head #1 a small hose goes upto the underside of the inlet manifold and a fat hose goes to somewhere near the throttle body; there are no check valves in the circuit.
This car does not have a PCV check valve. A little Google searching lead me to Saturnfans.com where I was able to get a picture/diagram of the crank case vent after joining the forum. This unit sits at the end (transmission side) of the rear head on top of the crank case. There are two outlets on this unit, one goes straight up to the intake, the other routes to the front of the intake. You can access it with a little patience and remove the vacuum lines to ensure that the ports are clear. I had to use my tip cleaners from my Oxy/Acetylene torch to clear the rear nipple. Now hopefully my leaking valve covers will be tamed.

I just wanted to add some more detail in case a fellow V6 owner stumbles onto this thread.
 

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Maybe this will shed some light. From what I have seen under the hood, there are several hoses to and from the throttle body. I have had the intake manifold off at least a dozen times (thank god its not that tough) and have not had a need or seen any hoses underneath to disconnect. There is a large hose from the IAC valve to the trottle body. There are two smaller hoses coming off the back and underneath of the throttle body. One goes to the fuel pressure regulator and one to what appears to be an electronic check valve that is mounted on the inside wheel fender and then that continues on into the fire wall which I was told was the charcoal canister/breather. There is also a third port off of the throttle body underneath that is capped. What brought all this to my attention was when I removed the hose from the FPR there was no vacuum so that's when I decided to see if the check valve was clogged. I followed the other end of the hose from the FPR to the throttle body and discovered it was hooked up to the port with no vacuum, but the other 2 ports are producing vacuum. So I capped the port with no vacuum and connected the FPR to one that was capped and producing but it made very little difference in the engine performance. Thats where I stand now.
The fpr has a tube connected to it that is supposed to be at ambient atmospheric pressure in the v6. So it was connected to the proper nipple. It should not have vacuum. So the change you made would have some effect on fuel pressure in the rail, and consequently on the quantity of fuel delivered to the cylinders.
I believe there is a tube from the oil separator to the underside of the intake manifold. I don't think there are any valves in this tube
 
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