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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
On Tuesday I completed the front suspension rebuild that I had planned several months ago (this will be posted in the performance section soon). It took 4 days because I did not trust any spring compressors. So I took my strut towers over to my mechanic to take off and put my new springs on.

Anyways I upgraded to GS poly stage 1 for the control arms which entailed inner, outer and arb bushings. To install I had to push out the bushings my control arm came with as shown in my pictures. I noticed something when I pulled the inner control bushings out that connect to the stanchtion arm.

On the left in the first photo is the Uro bushing pulled out and the right the Scantech (I got a deal for this set and is why I ended up with two brands). Notice the Uro did not have any lubracant in the bushing but the Scantech did. I noticed that the Uro used cheap rubber and the Scantech seemed to be of MUCH higher quality. It seems the Uro is garbage if one was to replace for everyday use. This didn't matter to me because of the poly upgrade. Why does one have lubricant and the other not? Quality issue? Shortcuts to save money during manufacturing? What do you guys think?
 

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I always assumed the bushings were sealed units, in that the lubrication would be sealed inside the rubber casing that surrounds the metal sleeve.

On other threads, the lingering question of quality differences between brands appears to be one of bushings and/or ball joints, as these are the pieces that wear.

IMO, since my stock bushings were completely shot, these may just be wear items that need to be renewed every so many miles or years or whatever.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
I would agree the ball joints are an issue and possibly the biggest issue for the failing control arms. This is why I replaced mine. But does anyone know what that lubricant serves as and why the Uro brand would not have it but the Scantech would?
 

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On my control arms, the bushings failed completely while the ball joints were in pretty decent condition.

My understanding is that the stock bushings are filled with oil as well.

I assume this assists in keeping the rubber from drying out and cracking sooner than it does.

Alternatively, since the bushing absorbs a lot of force, the oil may assist in dissipating heat.

But I don't really know for sure.

Is there no oil inside the Uro bushing if you break it apart even further? When I pushed my old bushings out, the center metal sleeve separated completely from the rubber. It's possible there is oil inside in between the two pieces. - EDIT: Disregard. You're talking about the larger, outer bushing. The ones that separated on me were in inner bushings that attach to the subframe.
 

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I want to say the oil/grease serves a dampening function or some sort but I agree with Mr. Meaty, it should be a sealed unit in my estimation. And, when they leak, at least you know they're bad.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
I would trust Moog. The Uro is garbage so don't even consider it. The Scantech seems to be the best cost effective control arm. Moog I think is about $140 per arm. I bought these two arms for $99 together new.
 

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If the control arm is heated and the joints and bushings are frozen, then there would be no need for any lubricant during assembly...
Does anyone know what procedure is used ?
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
I have taken manufacturing classes and have talked to my professor about this. There are two pieces that are cast that create the rigid arm. The ball joint is machined from a high grade steel alloy then placed between the two casts. If you notice on a control arm, all around the side has what seems to be a weld that was later ground down. I suspect the two cast peices are heated in a oven and placed together. The control arm has only the ball joint at this point.

The arm is taken to an area where it is then machined to its tolerances such as where the ARB bushings are and the inner and outer bushing as well. The inner most bushings is obviously just pressed into the hole. The outer bushing has a press fit sleeve to fit the bigger bushing into. Then the big outer bushing is pressed in. And the final product is complete!

I am not certain on how they join the two cast parts though yet. Quality control is an issue because some arms on the market are cast in Taiwan or China. They take short cuts and manufacturing processes or materials suffer.
 
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