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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
So, lets face facts, even the newest 9000 is an old car. If you want to drive an old car, without the fun of waiting on the side of the road for a tow truck, preventitave maintenance is a must. So what are your favorite things to replace, clean, fix, etc? What do you see as a must-do on a 9000? This turned into a great, informative thread in the NG900 forum, hopefully we can do the same.
 

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Discussion Starter · #2 ·
I'll start. Every time I buy a used car, I do the obvious stuff: air & fuel filter, plugs, Techron prior to oil change. I also like to clean all of the connectors with residueless electrical contact cleaner, then put a little dielectric grease on them before re-connecting. I do this with all grounds, fuses, relays, connectors, ect. When possible, I also clean the contacts with a wire brush or emory cloth. Sometimes it's amazing how dirty they are. Plus, it's nearly free.

A related thing, I like to clean everything really well. Such as the throttle body, BPC, etc.

As for just cleaning, Leatherique is an amazing product for leather. Regular application will restore your seats to like new, then keep them that way. It did wonders in my 944 Turbo, hoping for the same results in my new Aero.
 

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Check the plugs to make sure they are correctly gapped. As the plugs age, the gap gets bigger and a big gap will shorten DI cassette life.


If its a 5spd, bleed the slave and flush lots of fluid through it. Abrasive sludge collects in the slave and can damage the seals. My slave went and when I took it apart, an $.89 seal had abraded and was leaking.

Also, with a 5spd, change the transmission oil. Factory has no change interval at all, I change it every 50k miles or so.
 

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I flush all fluids and renew the supply, replace the plugs and filters, change windscreen wipers. I have also been known to change the drive belt and AC belt( if aplicable). Check your wheel bolts and check those tyres!:D
 

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My usual "old car" regimen...

(1) The obligatory fluid + lubricant changes (with applicable filters) and plug swap
(2) Swap out as many hoses and vacuum lines as reasonable, especially coolant hoses. Replace any gamey hose clamps and check tightening of the rest.
(3) Clean the TB and all sensors. Also, I deal with the really boring details...stuff like replacing any burnt bulbs and such.
(4) Rotate tyres (a judgement call based on inspection.)
(5) A full interior/exterior detailing session (best way IMHO to draw your attention to problem areas.)
(6) Finally, I grab my floor jack and a roll of quarters and head for the nearest car wash. I throughly clean the undercarriage and get the wand into any crevice I can reach. I try to focus on the engine and tranny so if/when I see leaks later on I can better gauge their severity before I deal with them.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Oh yeah, I forgot one of my favorites: coolant temp and air intake temp sensors. On order now for my 9000. The ECU uses the coolant temp sensor to gauge whether or not the engine is up to temp, the intake temp sensor feeds back the intake temp to the ECU. Both are used to determine the air/fuel ratio. Essentially, they can have a big impact on how much power you have, and how smooth your car feels. Replacing them on my 944 Turbo and E36 325i made a huge difference. The 944 especially, I swear it gained 20 HP.
 

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Important stuff is the motor mounts(both top and bottom ones) and also the idler and tensioner pulleys. ALso, the harmonic dampner.

Klim
 

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Heater core.

Radiator (plastic neck connecting to main hose can break off just like that !)

Carry a spare DI cassette unless yours is brand new or has known condition.

Headlight relays.
 

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FUel filter.
 

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That tensioner pulley tensioner (#5 or #6 in diagrams, looks like a small hydraulic shock) can and does leak. So if you're doing work in that area might as well get it replaced with a new one.





mulik51 said:
Important stuff is the motor mounts(both top and bottom ones) and also the idler and tensioner pulleys. ALso, the harmonic dampner.

Klim
 

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To make sure you have a good running saab 9000 first replace the fuel pump then have a look at that starter because it will mess with you then give it a full tune service like plugs fuel filter air filter DI cassett/harness and then take a peek at those breaks because the 9000 is a pretty heavy car. Then check all your fuses to make sure everything is straight then check that tranny/clutch because you don't want to be putting $$$ into that part hoowee seriously check all that then you'll be on the road for a nice long time till the air mass meter dies out and the crank sensor so don't forget to take care of those too impartant features
 

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buy a new relay for the fuel pump, its really cheap too and isnt that rare of a problem. (car cranks, wont start, fuel pump? might be the relay!)
 

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onewhippedpuppy said:
Oh yeah, I forgot one of my favorites: coolant temp and air intake temp sensors. On order now for my 9000. The ECU uses the coolant temp sensor to gauge whether or not the engine is up to temp, the intake temp sensor feeds back the intake temp to the ECU. Both are used to determine the air/fuel ratio. Essentially, they can have a big impact on how much power you have, and how smooth your car feels. Replacing them on my 944 Turbo and E36 325i made a huge difference. The 944 especially, I swear it gained 20 HP.
The older 9000 engine used separate coolant sensors for the dash gauge and for the ECU. The ECU coolant temperature sensor is in the head between cylinders two and three. Did they change this in the 2.3 engine? Frankly, I don't see how the coolant temperature sensor that feeds the dahs gauge can possibly input the correct signal for the ECU. In very cold weather the thermostat may not open fully until many miles have been travelled and the cylinder head is fully warmed up.
 

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Discussion Starter · #20 ·
Superaero said:
The older 9000 engine used separate coolant sensors for the dash gauge and for the ECU. The ECU coolant temperature sensor is in the head between cylinders two and three. Did they change this in the 2.3 engine? Frankly, I don't see how the coolant temperature sensor that feeds the dahs gauge can possibly input the correct signal for the ECU. In very cold weather the thermostat may not open fully until many miles have been travelled and the cylinder head is fully warmed up.
When I ordered mine, I recall there being two different sensors listed. There's no point in replacing the gauge sensor unless your gauge is giving weird readings.
 
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