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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Not originaly mine but I though worthy of repeating as I have done them both;
If your clutch engages low to the floor then the cable adjuster is worn or at it's limit. Solution - pull back the outer spring where it enters the bulkhead and clamp with a pair of mole grips. Pull on the exposed cable and fit a small jubilee clip around the cable to stop it slipping back. Test the clutch for the bite point and adjust the clip position to suit. When happy place another behind it to stop it slipping.
Stiff clutch - could be the lever mechanism in the belhousing is in need of a lubrication. Buy some spray grease - good quality high temp stuff. A few feet of thin plastic hose and about 8" of thin brass tube ( DIY superstores do both the latter). Fit one end of the hose on the spray grease nozzel and the other on the thin tube. You now have a device that can spray grease on the internal workings of the clutch. Remove the black plastic inspection cover and with your 'wand' you should be able to feel the vertical shaft of the mech as well as the fork and release bearing. ( do a search for some pics of this so can familiarise yourself as to what you are feeling) There is a bushing at the top and bottom which need attention as well as the release bearing and fork Give them all a good spray but make sure you don't point it to the left where the friction material is although you would have to try very hard and be willfully reckless to contaminate this. If you can get an assistant to operate the clutch while doing this all the better. It's also worth spraying the arm pivot where it enters the box and the nylon tab at the end of the arm. (Others have suggested using brake cleaner before lubrication as well using the same method) If it's still stiff it's probably the cable that could do with renewing and if it's still stiff after that your clutch is probably tired. If not you may be lucky and for very little expense and effort you may, as I did, find a worthwhile improvement in your clutch operation.
 

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I found another way to deal with this problem. I had a fairly thin piece of aluminum, about .050" thick. I cut some piceces of it about an inch and a half square and used a nibbler tool to cut a horse-shoe shaped slot in each, just wide enough to slip behind the adjuster when the adjuster is pulled out from the firewall. Then I used these spacers to move the adjuster out and raise the pedal. Plates can be added or removed to adjust the pedal height.
 

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These are all great ideas. Please be mindful that the additional tension on the cable caused by shims can (and will) lead to eventual cable breakage. So, when you do this, it might be a good idea to order a new cable and carry it with you.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
The amount of tension is unchanged- it's just moving the sleeve in relation to the inner cable. If it increased any tension on the cable itself you would get clutch slip:nono; .
 

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Shirozina said:
The amount of tension is unchanged- it's just moving the sleeve in relation to the inner cable. If it increased any tension on the cable itself you would get clutch slip:nono; .
You are correct. Let me rephrase. My choice of the phrase "additional tension" was poor and misleads one to interpret me as positing that extra tension exists on the cable during use. My intention was to point out that normal tension is being exerted along the cable, beyond the time that it can be expected to tolerate this (and thus the phrase "additional tension" was being used in the temporal sense). Stated another way, when the clutch cable reaches the end of its normal service life (i.e. it has been manually adjusted such that it can no longer adjust automatically or with manual assist) it has stretched the designed amount that is considered normal and within its specified range. When shims are placed at the collar, allowing one to extend the service life, and thereby continue to use this stretched cable, it is much more susceptible to actual breakage.
Two events are the cause of this. The obvious one is surpassing the design limits of the cable and its original tensile strength. The other less obvious one is that further compressing the cable sheath causes the angles of the bends in the sheath to become more acute. This causes higher resistance (friction) within the cable itself. So, a weaker cable working in a more hostile environment generates catastrophic failure (breakage).
All that said, I think these are fabulous bodges that can successfully usefully extend the service life of these troublesome cables. I am just hoping that people have back-ups so as to avoid the occasional awkward stranding.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Glad we agree:D - yes I have my spare in the boot. However it's not something I'd like to do at the side of the road so I may well put it on my to-do list in the near future.
 
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