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To buy or not to buy. . .that is the X question?

I had owned a number of wonderful 900's in the good ole days, and have recently acquired a seemingly well maintained 2011 9-3 2.0T sedan.

In actuality, was seeking a Saab Combi-X when I found this fine clean sedan.
The only thing I am less than thrilled with is the rear leg room, and the sound system seems very underwhelming.

Since purchasing this sedan a few weeks back, I have found not a combi but a very low mileage 2011 X which seemingly only needs a rear bumper replacement and has very very low mileage. But despite the fact that I had believed the Combi X was the car for me, I am hoping X owners can either lobby for or dissuade me from considering purchasing this 30,000 mile X 2.0T (of course) sedan. it would not address my desire for a more backseat or storage room but otherwise seems like a phenomenal deal.

Thanks, oh and fyi, I am a relatively decent wrench turner having pulled a few motors in my day, rebuilt a tranny or two and am somewhat competent at doing most everything but bodywork myself.
 

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I had owned a number of wonderful 900's in the good ole days, and have recently acquired a seemingly well maintained 2011 9-3 2.0T sedan.

In actuality, was seeking a Saab Combi-X when I found this fine clean sedan.
The only thing I am less than thrilled with is the rear leg room, and the sound system seems very underwhelming.

Since purchasing this sedan a few weeks back, I have found not a combi but a very low mileage 2011 X which seemingly only needs a rear bumper replacement and has very very low mileage. But despite the fact that I had believed the Combi X was the car for me, I am hoping X owners can either lobby for or dissuade me from considering purchasing this 30,000 mile X 2.0T (of course) sedan. it would not address my desire for a more backseat or storage room but otherwise seems like a phenomenal deal.

Thanks, oh and fyi, I am a relatively decent wrench turner having pulled a few motors in my day, rebuilt a tranny or two and am somewhat competent at doing most everything but bodywork myself.
Welcome to SC. Sent you a PM.

In my opinion XWD is not worth the unreliability and mileage penalty. Others will disagree I'm sure.
 

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Thank-you. . .I don't want to buy unreliability!

Is there a specific tire recommendation any of you owners have loved for the 9-3's. I am considering tuning my recent 9-3 purchase but will first basically get comfortable with the car as is first.

I also would love a recommendation on favorite ceramic brake pads, mine are the 302's on front.

I have changed my oil with the Mobil 1 0W40, as the previous short-term second owner had changed it at a Walmart and let them use Pennzoil Synthetic 5W-30. Anyone have a tip on their favorite filter, (I used the K&N PS7000)?

This weekend I will be changing out the tranny fluid, planning on doing the 3 change process with a case of Toyota T-IV, I have priced at the dealer at $5.61 a quart. In other vehicles, I have changed out the tranny by removing lower line from the cooler and pouring through 9 quarts or so until it runs clean and then closing off. I have found no one recommending this process anywhere in Saab forums anywhere. Would there be a reason this would not be possible on a 2011 Saab 9-3 with the Toyota made Aisin 5 speed automatic?
 

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Appreciate all advice from wizened Saab owners.

Thanks for your opine. I believe I am actually trying to find someone to talk me out of the purchase! My wife feels safer in and AWD, but with global warming it is hard to justify the necessity. Once a great skier and lover of all snow related adventures, I married a woman that curses anything remotely below 50 degrees. I sold her on the Saab purchase by suggesting they were basically built for the snow and used this article to drive home the fact that Saab pioneered FWD.

"Saab’s first chief engineer, Gunnar Ljungström, in 1960 authored a white paper covering many aspects of basic chassis design.

Mr Ljungström came from a family of engineers. Both his uncle and father were accomplished engineers who among other things designed turbines, an automatic transmission and apparently a bike with a freewheel hub. It was Mr Ljungström’s team who engineered the first Saabs and they must have done something right…

I accidentally stumbled across Ljungström’s whitepaper last summer. Anders Isaksson, a former Saab employee, kindly made available a copy of the whitepaper on his blog.

Unfortunately the document is written in Swedish. As a Norwegian I can understand most things written in Swedish, but half-way thru I abandoned my translation project due to the complexity involved. (sorry)

But even so, I wanted to draw some attention to this little gem. Who knows, maybe a good English translation exists out there somewhere?

In any case, the document can be summed up in one sentence: “FWD good, RWD bad, mmm’okay?”.

Some of the key elements discussed:

Stability. A car should have a low center of gravity and a good suspension system. FWD helps by eliminating the long drive shaft.
Comfortable. The lack of a drive shaft through the middle of the car usually means more room for the passengers.
Weight distribution. Putting the engine up front means 60% of the weight rests on the front wheels. FWD means the drive wheels have more grip. Useful when pulling the car through snow on a slippery surface.
Center of gravity. The lack of a long driveshaft makes it easier to put heavy parts of the car closer to the ground, as well as have the driver and passagers seated in a lower position. This helps reduce side movements and the ride feels more comfortable.
Under-steering is easy to correct. Just let go of the big pedal.
“When loosing grip due to applying too much throttle, or even due to engine braking, a RWD car can easily reach a state where it becomes impossible to correct its course.” (I actually managed this with my 9000 once. My rear fenders were packed full of ice, snow and slush. The braking effect of all the gunk caused my rear wheels to loose traction now and then, and the end result was me pulling a 180 degree turn on the main road. This made me realize the importance of putting the best tyres on the rear wheels, not because I think they’ll magically keep my fenders clear, but because I want to avoid loosing grip!)

Mr Ljungström acknowledges that a RWD car might be able to get up a steep hill covered in snow. As the angle increases, more weight will rest on the rear set of wheels. A driver of a RWD car can ask someone to sit in the back, or put a bag of sand in the trunk, “but where to find a spare passenger late in the evening? It is easier to simply ask your potential passengers to step out in case you encounter a particularly troublesome hill”.

Of course, a lot has happened over the last 50 years, but I find it difficult to not notice the many German cars stuck in the right lane after a little snow has been added to the mix. It isn’t easy to beat fundamental physics."

Hope you all enjoyed, I am too much of a newbie to be able to post links so apologize for the length!
 

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Is there a specific tire recommendation any of you owners have loved for the 9-3's. I am considering tuning my recent 9-3 purchase but will first basically get comfortable with the car as is first.

I also would love a recommendation on favorite ceramic brake pads, mine are the 302's on front.

I have changed my oil with the Mobil 1 0W40, as the previous short-term second owner had changed it at a Walmart and let them use Pennzoil Synthetic 5W-30. Anyone have a tip on their favorite filter, (I used the K&N PS7000)?

This weekend I will be changing out the tranny fluid, planning on doing the 3 change process with a case of Toyota T-IV, I have priced at the dealer at $5.61 a quart. In other vehicles, I have changed out the tranny by removing lower line from the cooler and pouring through 9 quarts or so until it runs clean and then closing off. I have found no one recommending this process anywhere in Saab forums anywhere. Would there be a reason this would not be possible on a 2011 Saab 9-3 with the Toyota made Aisin 5 speed automatic?
1. Contiextremecontact DWS06
2. Akebono euroceramic
3. I've used M1 0W-40 for 13 years on this car. Popped the valve cover to change the gasket. Everything looked great internally using 10k mile changes. Keep using it.
4. Might want to make sure the 2011 is a 5 speed and not a 6. 6 speed uses different fluid. Toyota Type IV will not work on it. It needs to be AW-1 only. I can't recall which cars got the 6 speed auto (maybe it was only the V6 automatic cars....). If it's still a 5 speed then yeah you can use the same fluid.
5. Tranny fluid change is in the How To sticky at the top of the forum.
 

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Oil filter? eh, whatever. I like Mann.
 

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Another shop for your list

Might I suggest adding East of Sweden Motorsports to your shop list? They work on a number of Turbo X versions and the main shop guy even owns one.

They are located in Boulder, CO
 

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TX suspension height

What is the suspension difference between the TX and 2009 Aero XWD? Is the TX lower? My 2009 has sport suspension but no lowering. If I switched to a TX spring set, would it lower my ride around 10mm.
 

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Turbo X - year 2008 - e-brake ?

In regards to Turbo X e-brake, are they usually connected to rear wheels or front wheels ? thanks
 

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Turbo X - XWD

In ref w/some “potential issues” w/XWD. Yesterday I got a vmsg from mechanic (reputable Saab dealer) apologizing, my XWD is working fine. Mechanics, even experienced ones, don’t know the Turbo X enough. XWD acts on demand, when needed. Good thing I insisted & did my own road tests on gravel, hilly terrain etc.... where my Turbo X reacts very well. That’s why I was so persistent when mechanic first told me that differential had an issue (?) Always be careful when a mechanic goes too quickly to a point to solve w/out some troubleshootings first. Good thing to dig & do research’s, especially w/such costly parts
 

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As an owner of a Turbo X combi who had to replace the Haldex rear diff last year, I'd say you need understand why you want the XWD. If you need 4WD or want the performance/handling potential, then get it. But if you've been a happy owner of another FWD Saab, and have not been left wanting, then I say skip the XWD. I got mine for its performance.
 

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I was very excited to see that Lacrosse/Srx rear cv boots fit our Xwd shafts.
Of course none of my local parts houses even list the rear boots from either of those options.
I also just noticed something. The Turbo X has an elsd rear end. My 08 Aero Xwd did not come with an elsd.
I wonder if the Lacrosse and Srx boots will even work for me?
The part number for the non elsd inner rear boot is 93192953, which is available through several online parts stores out of the U.S. but at $80us plus shipping, brokerage fees and import duties I would be paying nearly $150cdn per side for a bit of rubber and a bag of grease.

Has anyone tried any of the available universal cv boot kits on these cars?
Thanks
 

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Haven’t seen another XWD sportcombi

I am the owner of one of the 2009 1/84 sportcombi XWD Aeros w/ the V6. Mine has around 78k miles on it. Is my car really that rare? I just finished reading this thread, and now I’m afraid to drive it anywhere!

When I was buying it from Park Ave Saab in NJ, 4 other people called up inquiring about it. Traded my wife’s VW golf for it, because she got stuck in the snow twice in one day with golf. In the sportcombi, never got stranded once.

It is expensive to maintain. When I got it, I had to do the major service, and had to replace a bunch small electrical parts that weren’t covered under the extended warranty. Every dime I spend on the car is worth it, because it’s never let me down.

Haven’t seen another one since owning mine, and now I know why. :)
 

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Quick question and sorry if the answer is somewhere in the thread but I'm in a rush to find the answer... I'm waiting for the call back from the tech at my dealer.

Long story short... first owner on TX SC 81k miles. Got front right coil spring failure last monday (stock 2008 springs). Took the car for repair (I'm OK for certain parts of maintenance but suspension work is not one of them). I picked the car up an hour ago... looked weird and taller but I was in a hurry so I tought it would settle after driving. Got home and still looked weird. Did some research and found that they installed

93192512 - XWD sport chassis

they should have installed

12780358 - XWD lowered chassis

Is this right? They want to argue they installed the correct parts... I want to have arguments against them.

I assume that they installed the 93 X springs since it was taller ("outback" style)

Thanks for your help and sorry again if the answer is already posted... I'm at work trying to figure it out ASAP!!
 

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The turbo x always had a lowered chassis. I think you have it at on how they got it confused. Do you need proper WIS party number?

Wretched spelling? On mobile!
 

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The dealer is taking it up with the parts supplier since they made the mistake. The dealer supplied the serial number (without looking at the plate) and the parts supplier sent the X3 springs. I sent a picture of the plate with the correct code (X5). Should get resolved in the next couple of days.

I have the WIS/EPC CD showing 12780358 as the correct P/N.
 

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While this thread is getting some eyes on it. I've got an overeating thing with my turbo x. On boost/ acceleration I get almost like a miss/backfire/power train disconnect.

I feel like I read similar with rear diff issues?

Things I've done (not all to fix - some just because I was already ripping things off)
Rear diff oil
Elcd clutch oil / filter /gasket
Rear inner CV boot
Plugs
Coil packs
Filter (meh it was due!)

I do have that retarded p00089 so fuel pump is likely a summer job. But it not meeting demand under boost could possibly be it? Or will it just "work till it don't"? I did replace a something I can't remember in the engine bay (was easy) as a (try this before fuel pump) deal.

I know we have rear diff issues and being as it almost feels like power lossi thought it could be the transfer to the back wheels failing? I'm told that pulling the plugs to haldex or pulling up the e-brake a click just to turn in the light will disable XWD to test that true?

What did it feel like for the failing diffs?

Wretched spelling? On mobile!
 
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