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Alright so I have a 95 9000 CSE. The engine threw a rod out a little while back got a new motor but my turbo has play in the shaft. I just came across a 16G TD05 7cm turbo and I jumped on it now I would have to either rebuild my old turbo or try to find a way to change out my flange on the manifold and downpipe. My question is how hard is it to rebuild a turbo and would it be worth it, and what turbo is stock on this car? Please help, trying to get this thing done its been over a year with the engine deal.
 

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I'm not an expert on turbocharger rebuilds - by any means, so wait for others with more experience to offer advice. In the meantime:

I can't speak for the type you just bought, I'm more of an OEM type mechanic - but renewing seals and bearings on a stock blower (Mitsubishi/Garret T25/28) is relatively straight forward.

Provided that the installed rotating assembly is undamaged and does not require re-balancing it can be done in an afternoon. Rebuild kits are available for less than $50 - that's for a standard kit with journal bearings and carbon seals.

You get everything needed to complete the job. Some kits even include some things you don't need. That can cause some confusion at first. But when you disassemble everything becomes clear.

The hardest part is pulling the turbo out from between the exhaust manifold and the downpipe. Spray all 7 nuts repeatedly with PBlaster well in advance.

OH YEAH - before you even start, find a BIG heavy duty snap-ring plier. The snap-ring that secures the compressor housing to the CHRA (center housing and rotating assembly) is about 4 inches in diameter and wicked strong. I couldn't find one big and sturdy enough anywhere and consequently spent hours fabricating a jig to get it out.

And pick up a couple of cans of ZEP heavy-duty oven cleaner. You'll need it to remove all the old, baked on exhaust deposits and burnt oil (if you've had a seal failure).

Use some engine break in fluid to wet the bearings during assembly and be sure to prime the oil passages by pouring some motor oil into the CHRA just prior to installation.

Don't drop the shaft - the turbine blades are not much thicker than a beer can and if they get bent it should be sent out to be balanced.

Take lots of pictures and match-mark the 3 main sections as to their relative position to each other. After everything is together and you go to reinstall, that is not the time to find out that the turbine housing won't make up to the down pipe when it's bolted to the manifold. See the attached - the face that bolts to the manifold has to be parallel to a line drawn across the top two turbine hosing to downpipe studs. The inlet side is a hose connection and as such is a bit more forgiving but the exhaust to CHRA needs to be perfect or you will have leaks.

 

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make sure to mark the clocking of both sides of the turbine/compressor to the shaft. If they don't go back on right it'll be out of balance and will exploderize sooner than it should.
 
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