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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I was wondering what would be the cheapest and most effective way to pump up my 99, Ive considered a turbo swap out of a 83-84 but dont know if it will fit with out major mods? Or would it be worth rebuilding the original engine and putting a turbo on it. My plan with this car is between rally/race but still street legal, I want this car to eat Honda's. I would appreciate any help I can get. Thanks Ace
 

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Welcome :) Nice looking car!

To fit a later engine (known as the H engine) you'll need to do one bodywork mod to where the waterpump pulley faces the firewall. Also you'll need to either fabricate engine mounting brackets if you want to use a 16v H engine, or get hold of some european market brackets if you want to use an 8v H engine. Gearbox front mount remains the same.

8v engine will be easier to plumb in and wire up as they've been fitted to the 99, 16v you'll need to do a bit more thinking.

As for modifying your existing engine, the hardest part will be finding suitable pistons and valves. If you can get hold of a donor 99 turbo engine to drop in that would be easier.

Not sure what year your 99 is (looks to be a fairly late one) but you'll also want a 78- gearbox with the transfer chains rather than the earlier, weaker gears.
 

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Some sound advice from Nutcase as usual, Your first decision is to decide what kind of Honda you want it to eat! If it is the EK4 Civic then you are up against a modern 16 valve car with anything up to 170 bhp as standard!
Engine parts do seem to be getting harder to come by these days if you are considering a rebuild, although my experience seems to be that "b" series pistons seem more plentiful that "H".
I have gone down the route of rebuilding my "H" series 8v, but with hindsight I think I should have gone for a swap for a later 16v turbo engine from a late 900. As far as I can see this will give you a 175bhp starting point, with your only major headache being wiring.
Please bear in mind though that BHP is not the only issue, weight and gearing will play a major factor in your quest to beat Honda's, JDM models come with an LSD as standard.
 

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Yes a good plan, with any other model it might just work, however I'm spannering a few of these cars here in Scotland, which are taking over from the pug 205 as a start up rally car www.ecosse205challenge.co.uk. Although I'd love to say they can't match up to our Swedish favourites, they are proving to be a very tough and reliable car.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Yeah im really happy with the car, its a 1979 paid $500 for it has 105 thousand original miles only 10 thousand int the last 12 years drives really good and its a RALLY MACHINE ive eatn up all the dirt roads around my house, but it needs to be faster I am really considering putting a 83 turbo engine with the apc, I really dont want to cut the fire wall apart to put a 16v in it although the car would be scary ****ing fast. I also found out that the car was brought back from europe by a general in the navy.
 

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It's a thing of beauty for sure! Cleanest looking stock 99 I've seen in ages. Well the ball is in your court, how much of an increase in power do you want? As Nutcase has said you can swap to a later engine but you will have to cut the bulkhead. You could consider a different cam and a swap to a pair of twin webbers and a free'er flowing exhaust, should free up a few BHP. As with all these modifications it will come down to how deep your pockets are!
If you are enjoying flinging it down gravel roads, your money might be better spent sorting out the suspension. Better still join a car club, stick a cage in get a friend to navigate, and get yourself out on a rally, you'll never look back!
 

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If you can get a custom pulley and do without A/C the firewall can be "massaged" to fit a 16v. There's no way to undo the pulley bolt once the engine's in though if you don't want to go the cutting route. Parts for B's are getting scarce, so if that forces you into an H you might as well put in a B202 16V turbo, parts are everywhere.
That'd be a monster of a car capable of heinous things.
 

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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
Ok so if i could come up with a 16v turbo car with a running driving engine and tranny what would I have to do to get it in my 99?
 

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Discussion Starter · #15 ·
I need help on another thing, my car has been shifting like **** and part of it is this bushing/gasket can you tell me what it is so I can get it.
 

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It's not quite as simple as some people claim or imagine as they set off on a 99 t16 project.




1. Wiring, needs to be properly sorted. If you just bodge it then the car will break down far too often. My car had bodged wiring and it took me three weeks of fairly solid work to cut it all out and replace it. You can see an example of some of the original wiring towards the bottom of the photo. It was all like that.

2. Exhaust needs to be complete custom job. The easiest way is to buy an exhaust from a 900 16v turbo and create a custom exhaust hanger to hold the back box. The tail pipe needs to be shortened or you can mate an original 99 tailpipe to a 900 back box. The downpipe would be better off dropping out through the original hole in the floor as the clearance is too tight in my opinion to follow the 900 route. BIRDIEMANGO disagrees with this due to the number of rocks and things that you hit with the exhaust comming down the original 99 route. You could put in a little skid plate to protect that part of the downpipe where it exits the engine bay and then you have the best of both worlds. The downpipe needs to be custom although you can use the original 900 flange if you want to save some pennys there.

3. Cooling. You need to setup the 900 cooling system as it is in the 900. If you try and combine the cooling system of the 99 and the 900 into a hybrid then it won't cool properly and it will overheat. I know this as my car came with a system that was mostly 99 setup and it used to overheat like a pig, at one point I warped a cylinder head. I redesigned the system to copy the 900 setup. The big differences are the way the hoses route to the water pump. The radiator is also better in the 900 but the 99 one will do. I had the port to the radiator moved down from the top where it is on the 99 so it was somewhere near the middle - that suited my setup, but ideally you would have the port at the bottom - same as a 900. Then you need to fit a 900 headder tank for the coolant. The 99 one has different priorities. All the 900 tank does is keep a head on the water pump. The 99 tank acts like a link in the coolant system. At the end of the day, copy the 900 setup as much as possible and it will work. You deff need a radiator cooling fan.

4. Engine mounts. If you don't pay proper attention to some good quality engine mounts then the engine will swing around in the engine bay hitting all nearby objects. The crankshaft pully will try to bore a hole through the flywheel. You need to get some STIFF engine mounts to keep the engine steady. If you're serious about this project contact me at some point in the future and I'll tell you where to get them from. Not expensive, but necessary.

5. You need an injection fuel tank that will hold the injection pump. Can be done. Just need the right tank from a different model saab. Don't know exactly which one mine has, but it looks a lot like the tank from a 2-door 900 turbo.

6. Obviously, bulkhead / firewall needs to be moved inwards. Do it properly by cutting and welding. Give yourself at least an inch of space round the back of the engine, two inches would be ideal though. Remember, too close and the engine will hit the bulkhead - was one of the first issues I identified on my 99t16.

7. One thing a lot of people fail to consider is the idea that after going to all the trouble of fitting a t16 engine they are going to need to make it go like a T16. A standard 99 t8 can be quite eaisly tuned to match the original power of the standard t16. 175bhp is within easy grabbing distance. Saab were approaching 300hp with their 99 T8 rally car, although that would've been with an extreme racing setup. But point is, it would suck if you'd spent a lot of time making a t16 99 and some chap blows your doors off in a gently modified original 99t. So you should start with a fuel and ignition system that can be mapped. You need to think carefully about how you're going to cool your charge pressure. A limited slip diff is also really useful for keeping traction. I've recently converted to normal road tyres - cheap new ones - and even with the slip diff mine breaks traction at about 60mph in the middle of the gears on a dry road. If I only had 1 wheel drive at that point then I would be smoking the tyres. My gearing is long as well. That helps me beat a lot of other cars. When they're changing gear into second to come off the line I am in the prime part of a long first gear. When they're changing into 3rd I'm blasting through the boosted section of second.

8. Power steering would be ace. I'm going to fit this to mine at some point. The 99's are real mans cars without power steering. Even with arms like Popeye you never be strong enough to always be in control of a 99t16 - sometimes it will just do what it wants to do!

9. Everything else - I can't remember everything about my build - but trust me, it's a lot more serious than just dropping in the lump!
 
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