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Discussion Starter #1
I'm looking at a 9000 (92) that is reportedly in limp home mode - with TSC failure.

I found some info here, sort of looks like running the other way from this car is the best bet.
True?

Or are there relatively easy ways to diagnose the exact component failure without the SAAB Tech2?

Please advise.

I've never done anything with the 9000 cars at all- most all the others, but not that one

Mark
 

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I'm looking at a 9000 (92) that is reportedly in limp home mode - with TSC failure.

I found some info here, sort of looks like running the other way from this car is the best bet.
True?


Or are there relatively easy ways to diagnose the exact component failure without the SAAB Tech2?

Please advise.

I've never done anything with the 9000 cars at all- most all the others, but not that one

Mark
My $025:



TCS 9000s are more often a PITA than they're worth, especially nowadays when the general Saab servicing community is moving further (in time, parts and even expertise) from those cars and their componentry.

Best to get a '91 (with 900 face) non-TCS 9000:



Or '95 -> '98 9000 which don't have TCS at all ('tho it was optional on '95):

 

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I'm looking at a 9000 (92) that is reportedly in limp home mode - with TSC failure.

I found some info here, sort of looks like running the other way from this car is the best bet.
True?

Or are there relatively easy ways to diagnose the exact component failure without the SAAB Tech2?

Please advise.

I've never done anything with the 9000 cars at all- most all the others, but not that one

Mark
If its that '92 9000 on CL Seattle with TCS syndrome I would take Ken's advice and run away!
 

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Discussion Starter #4
Thanks guys.


After seeing the prices in some of the components likely to fail- that was my first thought. It i wanted to check.


Tanks
Mark
 

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I owned two 9000s with TCS, and as much as I'd like to say they worked for me. They didn't. Both of them suffered repeated TCS failures--sometimes I lived with them (turning the car off and on while driving to reset). Sometimes I fixed them, which usually required an expensive rebuilt throttle body.

I'd say 'run away' or be prepared to convert them to non TCS (which isn't easy).
 

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My 9000 CSE had a bad fuel pressure regulator

I do not have TCS, however, the problem with mine was the fuel pressure regulator. Locate the return fuel line to your tank and squeeze it kind of gently with vise grips. If your car runs just fine, its the fuel pressure regulator.

Your fuel circulates up to the engine and back to the tank constantly, as you step on the gas the regulator blocks the return more and more the faster you go so more fuel dumps into the engine where it is needed. With a bad regulator, all the fuel returns so hardly any is left for your engine to accelerate, all you do is idle.
I went to a couple of places and the techs had no idea what it could be so I got help here and did it myself for $100.00
 

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Having just driven across Nevada with an intermittent cruise control, I am reminded that in my two TCS cars, the cruise control (which is integrated with the ECU instead of a separate flakey box) always worked perfectly...
 
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