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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
On a 93 2.0T 2007, I'm trying to remove the oil sump to redo the seal and the oil level sender o-ring, I've got the air charge tube off, all the bolts, even the hidden one, but no matter how hard I try, the dipstick tube is robbing me of victory. I tried pulling on it, but after rereading the WIS, it says to unscrew the tube, thought it meant the mounting bolt at first, and I've got about a turn and a half to the left until it got too dark to continue. I tried removing the pan with the tube in but I can't tell if something in the engine or the tube is preventing me from sliding the pan out. Tomorrow I'm gonna try jacking up the transmission to raise the engine a bit, cause my mounts are about 50% broken which might be making the engine sit an inch or two lower than it's supposed to, and see if then gets me enough clearance to remove the sump with the tube.

Any tips or tricks on the dipstick tube in the meantime would be greatly appreciated.

I also apparently don't have a rear torque arm, was that only on the higher end models? I can see the bolt holes for it in the block, but I don't see a mount for it on the chassis.
 

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I recently did the oil level sensor o-ring repair and my dipstick was stuck as well. It pulls out - it does not unscrew - and is a friction fit with two o-rings. Since you got it to move spray PB Blaster or another penetrant and keep working it back and forth. I ended up using small vice grips to move it more and more and finally tapped the grip from below with a hammer handle (not a lot of room to swing a hammer...) and it came out. The tube was scratched and a little deformed where the vice grips grabbed it but the dipstick slides in and out without a problem and I painted it so it wouldn't rust. When reinstalling it lube the o-rings with Vaseline.

Since you think your mounts are sagging I suggest jacking up the passenger side of the engine about 1" with a block of wood under the pan. Remove the three bolts that you can see on that side as well as the somewhat hidden lower AC compressor bolt. Then wedge a small wood block between the crankshaft pulley and subframe to keep the engine higher. There should be enough room to lower the pan and move it slightly towards the passenger side to get it off. The oil pump pickup keeps the pan from moving towards the driver side so you need to create space by slightly lifting the engine.

Clean the pan mating surface, paying attention to the oil delivery tube and be sure to apply a uniform 1/4" bead of sealant there as well. Carefully fit the pan trying not to disturb the sealant. Fit the accessible bolts, then remove the block wedge to access the three bolts on the passenger side and the lower AC bolt.

The oil level sensor design is a PITA. Think the torque arm is only on manual transmission cars.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
I did it! the tube is out and the sump is finally off! With some aid pulling on the tube from the top, I got a flat head under the bottom rim of it to pry it out at the same time. Also raised the engine from the crack with a floor jack and a piece of wood. New problem though, after replacing the sender o-ring, I pulled hard enough on the wire that the outside insulation that goes from the connector to the sender cracked, I can see the wires and fiber insulation which is completely soaked with oil, meaning the inside of the wire has probably been flooded for a while and might still work, though I'm also worried that it might degrade further and break apart overtime into the sump. I'm doing dress rehearsals for replacing the pan now.

Is the cracked insulation something I need to worry about? guess the worst case is the ECU complains that the sensor failed and/or it starts leaking out of the connectors.
 

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I'm sure the insulator was brittle from heat and age. Try JB Weld (which is resistant to oil and gas) around the crack, letting it harden overnight before refilling it with oil. Use lacquer thinner or acetone but not alcohol to clean it. I'd bet the connector internals are sealed.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Welp, we're gonna test the internally sealed connector theory, pans in, torqued to spec, managed to lose one bolt and find it, only thing left is the oil filter which I got the wrong socket to deal with, going to advance auto to get a low profile 32mm tomorrow, then fill it with oil if it's not raining. I might've messed up the sealant when putting in the pan, but I'm not sure if I caught the main artery on a crank bolt or the outside of the pan on the subframe, could go either way. If the sender fails and the computer keeps complaining that it has no oil even when full, then I gotta do the whole song and dance again anyway. Perhaps next time it would make more sense to do the main artery seal on the block first, since then getting caught on a crank bolt putting the pan in wouldn't be a big deal, only if the flange seal got caught.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Aight, drove it 15 miles on city and highway, everything appears to be good, I hear clicking without the dust cover when it's running, though that might be my imagination getting freaked out over the sound of the valves and injectors running normally. Also sounds quieter in the car, again, not sure if its my imagination or if there is a real difference between castrol and mobil1 0w-40, used to be castrol for 10,000 miles cause take 5 carried that.

No leaks from the sender, seems to still be working despite the cracked insulation, giving some time to rule on the pan seal that would leak oil to collect on the charge pipe.
 
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