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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
What a Pain in the butt still didn't get it off so frustrated if anyone has suggestion please thanks
 

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Break out the dremel, you start by cutting a slit in the head and using a flat blade screwdriver, or you can roughly cut it to a hex shape and hammer a socket on there, or you can cut the old CPS out of the way to allow more room for vice grip.
Someone else had good luck with one of these: Gator Grip ETC-200MO Universal Socket - Amazon.com

Also removing the downpipe if you haven't already allows better access.
 

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PB Blaster:




Wire brush, PB Blaster again, then set the the torx bit in place and tap it with a hammer, then attach the handle and attempt removal.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Break out the dremel, you start by cutting a slit in the head and using a flat blade screwdriver, or you can roughly cut it to a hex shape and hammer a socket on there, or you can cut the old CPS out of the way to allow more room for vice grip.
Someone else had good luck with one of these:
Gator Grip ETC-200MO Universal Socket - Amazon.com

Also removing the downpipe if you haven't already allows better access.
Thanks i was trying not to take the down pipe off but looks like iam gonna have to Ive been PB Blasting it hopefully today i can get it off
 

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BEFORE CUTTING I would always recommend using a vice grip on the outside of the screw! Get it down nice and tight and try that first. An alternative would be to use a hammer and chisel, and direct the force counter clockwise, against the torque, obviously.
 

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I'm not entirely certain of the positioning of the crank sensor. But if you can safely get a heat source under there like one of those mini butane lights and heat up the screw. Sometimes the heating then cooling will fracture some of the corrosion loose.
 

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Kroil has worked best for me. Use a butane torch to help it wick into the threads. Dab some valve grinding compound into the bolt head before unscrewing. If possible use a speed handle and it must have the "comfort knob" style that snap-on has (http://buy1.snapon.com/catalog/item...roup_ID=674824&store=snapon-store&dir=catalog) so you can put the weight of your chest into it. If that does not work, try an easy out. If that does not work, weld a large bolt onto the messed up head. The heating and cooling from the welding tends to shrink the stuck bolt loosening it in the threads; and you now have a large bolt head you can get a large wrench onto.
 

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ON a difficult bolt, I found that the Vise-Grips (needle-nosed) worked effectively in a very small space.
I thinks it is generally best to make the work room as large as possible when faced with recalcitrant hardware...torx, spline, Phillips, slot, allen, hex, whatever - all of these are difficult due to corrosion...
The oils are not effective unless we have heat and or vibration.
Use anti-Seize on the threads, which, IMO, the factory should have..
 

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I'm not entirely certain of the positioning of the crank sensor. But if you can safely get a heat source under there like one of those mini butane lights and heat up the screw. Sometimes the heating then cooling will fracture some of the corrosion loose.
Heating generally causes expansion in metallic objects (though it will encourage the absorption of the penetrating spray) while cooling promotes contraction, though you had damn well be sure to protect the surrounding area, and the wiring harness in particular, from the heat of the flame or you could, potentially, damage other associated/surrounding components.
 

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Rusted parts: Ideally you'd heat the area around the screw, it would expand, and the screw would come loose. On a practical basis, it's hard to heat the larger object that contains the bolt/screw hot enough to matter without heating the bolt/screw itself. In addition, getting things red hot seems to loosen them, even if both are heated.

The other option (mentioned above) is to use a freeze spray. Again, ideally you'd just freeze the screw/bolt. Loctite came up with a new theory and built a product around it: use a freeze spray containing pentrating oil to freeze the parts, causing cracks in the less than robust rust, letting the oil in, and allowing the parts to break free.

It's a little expensive, so I bought some generic electronic freeze spray (-50F) and tried that, followed by PB Blast. I can't say that it worked in my test, but I didn't have side by side tests to do with and without the spray (never had that for heat either, but sometime it really does help). More tests to come.

The freeze spray is a nice option where you don't want to use a flame or extreme heat.
 

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Had this same problem 2 days ago... Screw was beginning to strip so I was planning on dropping downpipe and getting it out with an impact.

Instead I heated it up with a torch and it came loose..
I would use the torch, best and fastest option
 

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Keep an extinguisher near by... I'm just sayin'
 

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At least I'm not the only one... ;)

I did remove my downpipe. Then tried the cut/screwdriver thing. And the vise grips thing. I gave up and just used a grinding stone on my Dremel and ground the head completely off. Removed the remains of the sensor (I had ripped the bulk of it off to get more room) and the screw shaft came out with my fingers.

:evil::evil::evil::evil::evil::evil:
 

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Guess I'm lucky, my car decided to shut down ok me as I get to Florida, I had a new crank sensor in the glove box. I had it swapped in about 25 minutes, but that wasn't the problem... Turns out it must be the DIC.
 

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Discussion Starter · #17 ·
I gave up and went to a mechanic 60 buck he put it in and now runs like a champ he just got the screw out some how and replaced with a bolt so now I can just use a socket if I ever have to replace it do any of u guys no if my year had a heat shield I couldn't find we're it would go
 

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Mine has no heat shield either. After looking at many pics, I don't think it came with one.
 

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Mine has no heat shield either. After looking at many pics, I don't think it came with one.
The NG900 didn't come with one. For whatever reason the exhaust manifold has the protrusion off the front that you can drill and tap for an 8mm stud so you can bolt a heat shield on. I did that a few years ago. Cast iron is pretty soft and drills very easily, even with a cordless drill.
 
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