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wrong place to begin with, take it to the 9-5 forum ::mod move plz::
 

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Not sure but one suggestion is to go to Big Lots and get a set for $10. Working on Saabs and Volvos will make it handy to have a full set, especially if you start doing any interior work.

Note: if you're removing any bolt that requires 40+ lbs. torque then don't use a cheap bit :) I'll bet the crankshaft position sensor is less than 40 ft*lb.
 

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Does this help?

MI-Roger said:
So even though the CPS isn't in the best possible location, it isn't too bad either. I did all work from above, some have done all work from below.

The CPS is located on the front side of the engine, down low on the block (in line with the crank), close to where the transmission bolts to the block. It is covered by a small metal heat shield, maybe 1-1/2 inches square. The single torx head screw which secures the heatshield to the block is the same screw which holds the CPS in position.

Remove the turbo by-pass tube and the heat shield over the turbo to gain more room.

I built up the following Rube Goldberg assembly to remove/replace the screw:
  1. Torx bit, same size as the valve cover screws, securely taped into a
  2. 1/4-inch 6 point socket from a 1/4-inch drive socket set attached to a
  3. 1/4-inch drive to 3/8-inch drive adapter attached to a
  4. 3/8-inch drive universal style flex adapter attached to
  5. 12-inch long socket extension
The screw is installed with low torque, so a torx head allen wrench may be easiest and quickest, but I don't own a set of those.

When you remove the old CPS, check to be sure the old O-ring is still attached to it. If no O-ring, reach your finger into the engine block hole and pull it out. A double O-ring will cause you all sorts of problems because the new CPS won't pick-up the teeth on the flywheel correctly.

The CPS mounting hole in the block is a stepped hole, or counterbored hole. Make sure the new CPS is fully seated correctly in the hole. If the mounting ear on the new CPS is not perfectly flat against the screw boss, the new CPS is hung up on the lip of the counterbore and not seated properly. Wiggle it to correct. An improperly positioned CPS will give the same problem as two O-rings.

The CPS plugs into a connector located next to the throttle body on the back side of the engine. You will see three connectors positioned front-to-back, I seem to remember the CPS being the connector closest to the engine.
And:

twilker said:
The heat shield is directly over the CPS and uses a common torx (T-30) bolt to hold both the heat shield and CPS into the block. The torx bolt aligns the rotation of the CPS when it is mounted into the block. I used a 1/4" ratchet with a torx fitting (left handed) to remove the bolt. It is done from underneath the car, so putting it on ramps or jacking up helps.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
I purchased a nice set from Sears "Craftsman", but it seems the T-25 is too small and the T-30 is too large. I just wanted to know if somebody new the exact size, because there is a T-27-but just not in my set.

Thanks,
AJ
 

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Are you sure its not just a bit rusted, can you tap the T-30 in?
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Mission Accomplished

Thank-you, every post in here was very helpful. I sprayed "liquid wrench" on the bolt, took off the O2 sensor, removed the turbo value, turbo shield and lowered that big pipe,I'm sure it has a name. I was almost positive that it was not a T-30 until I pounded that bit with a hammer (small wrench) until it fit, then it came right off. I'm so glad someone said something about the old o-ring might remain behind, because I almost installed the new CPS right on top of it. Now the car starts right up w/o any hesitation.
Again thanks,
AJ
 

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I just finished this repair on my 2001 2,3T SW.

My only problem was getting the lower bolt on the big exhaust pipe, attaching to the turbo, off. You'd be better off with a 13 mm ratchet wrench.

Other than that, everything went smooth. Well, I don't really know yet if it has helped my problem (motor sometimes missing and difficult to start, turns over but does not ignite) but hopefully it has.

After dismounting the aluminum cooling pipe and the exhaust pipe, I could hammer in a T30 torx bit, and then use a screwdriver handle to remove it.

Thanks for this thread!

/Bo
 
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