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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I have everything off finally after 2 months of messing with this damn saab I finally found my problem.

Is it possible for me to reset the timing myself or is that something i should leave to the professionals? im not sure how to do it but with a DIY im almost positive i could.

I guess thats why the car wouldnt start.... there was no compression because the timing was off.... phew what a giant headache... cant wait to be driving my beautiful saab again tho.



so excited, if anyone has bad news go for it and tell me whats up.:cheesy::cheesy::cheesy::cheesy::cheesy::cheesy::cheesy::cheesy:
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
6, I know its a zero clearance engine, but ive saw a few people have had similar problem and lucked out. without damaging valves.
 

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Timing Jumped 4-5 Teeth, concerns? Reply to Thread

I had that happen on our KIA Sedona (also 6 cyl). One bank jumped 3-4 tooth due to a malfunctioning tensioner. However, the KIA was forgiving and everything was fine after I reset the timing...no valves destroyed or anything. It is also an "interference" engine. Don't know about Saab V6, though.

Anyway, found this video before whene I was searching for my Saab 9-5 4-cyl (which has a chain), and thought it may help you. Shows step by step belt replacement on a V6 by a mechanic. Looks pretty straight forward (similar to our KIA).

Good luck and let's hope for the best!


If link does not work, just go to You Tube and search for Saab 9-5 timing belt.
 

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Timing Jumped 4-5 Teeth, concerns

Check this video, it will show you step-by-step how to replace and set the timing belt in the Saab 9-5 V6.


I don't know how tolerant the Saab 9-5 V6 is when you've jumped 4-5 teeth. The fact that you have no compression is a concern. I had a similar event on a KIA Sedona (V6), when timing jumped 3-4 teeth on one bank...still had compression though, just ran rough. Once I reset the timing (changed the belt and put in a new belt tensioner [the root of the problem]), everything was just fine.

If it still does not work after re-setting the timing belt, you obviously have more work ahead...checking valves, etc.

Good luck!
 

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I'm kind of new to this site (as a registered user and doing postings), and tried to respond to this post without success. Did it four times, but it does not stick! I tried to paste in a link for a youtube click, maybe the administrator does not like that?

Anyway, go to Youtube and type-in "Saab 9-5 timing belt", and you'll find a very instructional video done by a Saab techie (I think). Very long (40 min), but shows you step by step how to change the belt (and the water-pump), including how to set the timing. He's using all kinds of special Saab tools, which you probably don't have access to. But you can do this with regular tools. Looks pretty straight forward to me, but of course depends if you've done this before. If you don't have the experience, you may want to re-think it though, as it is quite an undertaking once you start it.

Whether the engine has been damaged remains to be seen. The fact that you don't have compression (did you do a compression test?) is alarming though. I had this happen on my wife's KIA Sedona V6. Belt jumped maybe 3-4 teeth due to breadown of the tensioner. It is also an interference engine. We were lucky, however. The car ran rough and you could start to hear metal to metal sounds. But she was smart and pulled-over and we towed the car back home. After changing the belt (and stupid me did not change the water-pump, which will come back to haunt me soon, I'm sure...), the car runs just fine. She's put on another 10,000 miles so far, and (knock on wood), without any additional mishaps.

So, i suggest that you give it a go and try to just reset and see what happens, but be prepared that you could have more damage too (bent valves, whatever).

Good luck!
 

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^^ This video I presume? WARNING: This isn't the proper way to change the belt. See below for how this video goes wrong. Always lock your timing before removing the belt, not after!

Also you should really do a compression test on the engine just to be sure no valves are bent. Honestly you would know if they were because the engine will run terribly, but its ALWAYS a good idea to double check first. You can rent Compression testers from Auto-parts stores or buy one on Amazon (for instance) for $25.
 

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Holy crap!!!! Do NOT follow this video to swap your timing belt! He doesn't have ANYTHING lined up like it's supposed to be BEFORE taking the old belt off or when he's putting the new belt on! PLUS, he also doesn't have anything locked down so if you even bump something your valves could get out of time! The special tools he uses after putting the new belt on needs to be used BEFORE taking the old belt off and keeping everything locked down while you install the new belt!!

Use the video only as a general guide and not something to take step by step unless you want to possibly turn your engine into a boat anchor!! Use the Bender page to do your belt swap safely and correctly!!

Wow!! I am SO GLAD I didn't see and follow this video when doing my belt swap!!!! :roll:
 

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Holy crap!!!! Do NOT follow this video to swap your timing belt! He doesn't have ANYTHING lined up like it's supposed to be BEFORE taking the old belt off or when he's putting the new belt on! PLUS, he also doesn't have anything locked down so if you even bump something your valves could get out of time! The special tools he uses after putting the new belt on needs to be used BEFORE taking the old belt off and keeping everything locked down while you install the new belt!!

Use the video only as a general guide and not something to take step by step unless you want to possibly turn your engine into a boat anchor!! Use the Bender page to do your belt swap safely and correctly!!

Wow!! I am SO GLAD I didn't see and follow this video when doing my belt swap!!!! :roll:
Oh god! I actually didn't watch it. If he didn't lock the timing gears before removing the belt, thats VERY dangerous and could lead to serious issues. Its incredibly easy to knock the timing out without even noticing and if you knock it out far enough, you turn your car on and lunch your engine. Not something anyone wants to go through.

I'll leave the link up but add a warning.
 

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I did not look through the video very closely, as I own a 4-cyl 9-5 with a timing chanin. However, I have successfully changed timing belts on many V6 engines without locking the sprockets upon belt removal. I would of course line-up all the marks (crankshaft, sprockets etc.). Then I take the belt off. I usually lock the sprockets before i put the new belt in. Also, a trick on many cars (don't know about the Saab V6) that you have to ulimately offset the timing marks slightly on the exhaust cambank (like 2-3 mm) and then fit the belt between the crankshaft pulley and the exhaust sprockets but not yet fit the belt over the intake sprockets. It is important but not so easy to get the belt nice and tight between the exhaust cams and the crankshaft pulley. So then turn the exhaust the cams 2-3 mm CC, which creates a tight belt between the crankshaft pulley and the exhaust sprockets. By pulling them 2-3 mm CC, the timing marks become aligned and the sprockets move "together" since they're locked by the cam tool and the belt. After that, I would fit the belt over the water-pump pulley and up over the inlet sprockets (doing the same thing here, offfsetting the timing marks first - maybe only 1-2 mm - and then pulling them in 1-2 mm by turning the inlet sprockets CC 1-2 mm. Makes sense?
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
I dont really understand how the cam wheels are so far off.... When the crank is at TDC the 2 cams seem to be 4-5 teeth past the marks on the timing cover... I dont know what to do to reset them.

Does anyone have a picture, diagram of how they are suppose to be lined up? and how in the hell did it ever get so far out of time?

When the belt jumped time, did the cams just keep spinning? Im very confused to this. Im going to take a few pictures I think and see if someone can help me?
 

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I dont really understand how the cam wheels are so far off.... When the crank is at TDC the 2 cams seem to be 4-5 teeth past the marks on the timing cover... I dont know what to do to reset them.

Does anyone have a picture, diagram of how they are suppose to be lined up? and how in the hell did it ever get so far out of time?

When the belt jumped time, did the cams just keep spinning? Im very confused to this. Im going to take a few pictures I think and see if someone can help me?
Click on this link,it has information (and other links to diagrams, etc.) on how to change the timing belt. Also has pictures. Looks like the timing marks are in the middle of sprockets.

Once you get the old belt off, you should be able to move the sprockets with a wrench to align the marks on sprockets and the housing. Just be careful so the sprockets don't "spring" on you. If they do, you can still turn them back. How tricky this is I guess depends on the car. I have not done this on a Saab V6, but on many other cars and usually not a big deal. Once you've aligned all the sprockets, use sprockets holders (can buy at NAPA, for example) to hold the sprockets together.

Why they moved to begin with? Can only guess two things; old and worn-out belt maybe, how many miles since belt was changed? Or, defective tensioner (I had this happen to me). I would change also the tensioner as well when you're doing this.
 
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