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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I am in the middle of replacing the head gasket and timing chain on a 95 900 se. Can anyone give me any tips in changing the timing chain guides?
 

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ianlax55 said:
I am in the middle of replacing the head gasket and timing chain on a 95 900 se. Can anyone give me any tips in changing the timing chain guides?
Whoa, weren't you just having a cyl 4 misfire like two days ago? Does this have something to do with it?

Haynes appears to have a good write-up on the subject of timing chain and guides replacement. Do you have the engine in or out?
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Different car completely, i got a new DI cassette for my car and its fine.
the motor is in, in the 95, i was just wondering what tricks anyone new of in getting into that tight area around the timing chain cover.
 

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The timing chain is pulled from the top opening. One link is cut, it is joined with the new chain and then slowly and carefully routed out.
Has the TC tensioner been measured yet ??
I hope I have this correct; there are other threads on this with better info..

Trouble is, only the top guide can be changed with this method...
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
The guide on the exhautst side is broken, to replace am i goin to have to pull thye motor or is it possible to change the guide "in car"?
 

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Timing cover

Most professional mechanics consider that an engine-out job, in part because you can't get good access to the balance chain sprockets and tensioner with the engine in the car, and they don't consider the job done properly if they can't replace those parts if needed. The logic is that the balance chain is often in the same sad state as the timing chain. In part because they may not be able to get the cover back on and sealed with great confidence, and it makes them look bad if someone comes back with a timing cover oil leak.

Haynes manual claims it can be done in the car, but does not explain what tools would be used to get the timing cover bolts off and back on in that small space. I have heard someone welded a torx bit into a long-pattern flat box wrench to do it (basically the same tool used to remove the old version of the lower idler which had the torx mushroom bolt).

There is one mechanic from CA (Anders, "Swedecar") who posts on the SN board occasionally who described how the engine can actually be pushed over to make the space wider, but I have not tried that myself, and not even sure I understand it.

If you manage to do it, please post the details for the rest of us.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
i have a mini hex ratchet that fits into some tight spots, so i think i can get into the spot with that.
 

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I would try my utmost to do this task correctly, in every facet.
There are too many compromises made with such poor access, particularly to the all important seal..
Now, if we could , without too much fuss ,move the engine "back" by 6 to 9 inches.
I wonder if this this is even possible...

Granted, 5 to 6 hours are spent to R and R an engine, but then , with say 2 hours of easy work, one has full access to the sprockets, all chains and guides and even the oil pan, if necessary (the oil screen)...
 

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IIRC, Swedecar wrote on TSN that if the drivers-side shaft was removed, and the 2 front mounts loosened, and the engine supported from above, that the engine could be pushed toward the drrivers-side about 4"-5". Other stuff would have to come off like the shift shaft, delivery pipe, downpipe, hoses, etc... Ron
 
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