SaabCentral Forums banner

1 - 2 of 2 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
100 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
I was changing my coolant, thermostat and oil today and decided I'd clean out my throttle a bit since the car had been starting a little bit more grumpily than it has in the past.

My first question: After cleaning the black crud off the butterfly valve and the throat, it took considerable effort to get the car to start... Is this basically because the car was eating intake cleaner? It runs fine now, I just wanted to make sure I didn't do anything nasty...

Second: There is a thick hose that goes from the throat to the top of the engine. It connects to a little plastic thing that comes out of the head under the silencer behind the word "SAAB" on the engine. It fits on the plastic piece, but it is very loose.. I can pull it off with my fingers... What is this hose, and should I get a hose clamp for it?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,293 Posts
There is a thick hose that goes from the throat to the top of the engine. It connects to a little plastic thing that comes out of the head under the silencer behind the word "SAAB" on the engine.
That is part of the crank case ventilation system. Water vapor and hydro-carbon fumes get pulled from the top of the engine into the throttle body and burned up as best as possible, for fewer emissions.

The hose is loose because it gets coated with oil on the inside. Normally it gets inspected along with the rest of the vacuum hoses during the 30k service, and replaced. You can use a cable tie to keep it tight, but unless it is leaking oil I would not bother.

Hopefully, someone can post on the n/a engine specifically.

On the turbo, that line is a 4-mm (inside diameter) rubber hose you can get at any auto part store for 50 cents per foot. It can be replaced with silicone hose, or reinforced hose if the condition gets bad. The rubber grommet at the valve cover can also be replaced for a couple bucks if it is leaking.

Here is what it looks like, replaced with 4.8-mm reinforced fuel line:



That line is much more critical than on a turbo than on a non-turbo engine, because it includes a plastic check valve (a.k.a. "that poor excuse for a PCV valve"), which is supposed to keep the boost pressure out of the wrong parts of the engine. Currently, I am blaming the poor ventilation system for contributing to what will probably be $2000 of engine work...
 
1 - 2 of 2 Posts
Top