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Interesting…too bad there wasn’t a before/after so we could see what the difference was before spending $$ on getting it done (for those of us who don’t own a tech II).
 

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Only for Autos.

If you have a tuner connect to the ECU you can adjust the RPMs further. I've gone as far as 900-925 on a few peoples cars. Stock is 800-825.
 

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2005 9-5 Aero Wagon
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Standard dealer goto fix for steering wheel vibration at idle was to increase idle speed from 800 to 850 rpm.
Didn't work in my 04 Aero Auto.
 

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Interesting…too bad there wasn’t a before/after so we could see what the difference was before spending $$ on getting it done (for those of us who don’t own a tech II).
@shaggy I was the one who made that video and I can say that it helped, but did not eliminate, the vibration. I'd say it's 50% improved over stock.
 

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I would think the resonance of the engine mount rubbers changes with age/use so the harmonic relationship with the engine is going to be different in each case.
 

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I would think the resonance of the engine mount rubbers changes with age/use so the harmonic relationship with the engine is going to be different in each case.
Changing my passenger engine mount made my vibrations much less. I have a new rear one on the shelf but havent tackled that yet. Couldn't tell that my passenger mount was really bad until I removed the horse collar/wishbone mount and the engine mount could flop around.
 

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2002 9-5 Wagon, 2002 9-5 Aero, 2003 9-5 Aero, 2002 9-3 Aero
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Doesn't increasing the rpm's induce trans creep?
 

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People logically focus on engine and transmission mounts together with idle speed to diagnose and fix vibration. But I have recently observed that exhaust hangers may be a significant contribution too. It's all about pendulums and harmonic vibration.

I discovered this accidentally, while working on my daughter's 2006 wagon to remedy a "squeaking" noise at idle and low rpm. It turned out not to be at the front, but a rubber exhaust bushing on the muffler that allowed the retainer clip to rub the metal hanger. I didn't have OE rubber bushings on hand, so I made do with some fat rubber tube slit and zip-tied around the muffler hanger rods of the chassis. This had the effect of limiting the freedom of the muffler to wiggle, but not to make it rigid with the chassis. When I started up the car I had eliminated the noise, AND to my pleasant surprise I had reduced the steering wheel vibration by half or better.

So if you are frustrated by replacing engine and transmission mounts and not getting rid of vibration, consider renewing your rubber exhaust bushings and checking exhaust alignment. Bushings are relatively cheap, and 1-by-1 replacement is not too bad except that the clips may be sharp and rusty.
 

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People logically focus on engine and transmission mounts together with idle speed to diagnose and fix vibration. But I have recently observed that exhaust hangers may be a significant contribution too. It's all about pendulums and harmonic vibration.

I discovered this accidentally, while working on my daughter's 2006 wagon to remedy a "squeaking" noise at idle and low rpm. It turned out not to be at the front, but a rubber exhaust bushing on the muffler that allowed the retainer clip to rub the metal hanger. I didn't have OE rubber bushings on hand, so I made do with some fat rubber tube slit and zip-tied around the muffler hanger rods of the chassis. This had the effect of limiting the freedom of the muffler to wiggle, but not to make it rigid with the chassis. When I started up the car I had eliminated the noise, AND to my pleasant surprise I had reduced the steering wheel vibration by half or better.

So if you are frustrated by replacing engine and transmission mounts and not getting rid of vibration, consider renewing your rubber exhaust bushings and checking exhaust alignment. Bushings are relatively cheap, and 1-by-1 replacement is not too bad except that the clips may be sharp and rusty.
I am totally checking this. I already have a teeny tiny leak at my 2nd flex pipe, so I have to poke around there anyway.
 
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