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Both my '05 Arc and my wife's '04 Arc wagons started slowly leaking coolant at about the same time. Her car (The Mighty Thor) started leaking about a week before mine but it's due to go into the garage for a series of much needed repairs anyway so I just kept adding water to it. When mine (The Muttmobile) started leaking at about the same rate I guessed that it must be the heater control valve. I have been through this before with my '03 Linear and '03 Aero. After pulling the cover off the wiring connector and probing around between the engine and firewall, my suspicions were confirmed. I ordered a pair of the valves from eEuroparts. However I drive quite a bit more than the wife and the new parts will probably not be here before the end of the week so I decided to try pulling the offending part off and attempting to plug the leak. I seem to remember trying this before with little success. I decided to try harder this time. The last time I simply squished some five minute epoxy around the part that seems to be press-fitted into the end - the part that the bottom hose connects to. This is the only place it can leak. There are no open seams or cracks anywhere else. I used liquid epoxy made by J B Weld formulated for plastics. I cleaned it with alcohol and blew it dry with compressed air - twice. Then I used sand paper and a wire wheel to rough up the surface. Once the liquid epoxy set, I applied epoxy putty - again, made by J B Weld: "Water Weld". It's formulated to be used on plumbing.

I let the epoxys set up overnight and I'll be putting it back on in a few minutes. My plan is to leave it on as long as possible to see how long this repair holds while keeping the new part in the glove compartment just in case.
 

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2005 Saab 9-5 Aero Sedan '98 corolla until my 9-5's engine is finished:'~((
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It's o-ring in that seem that allows the leak. When I replaced mine with a new valve I loaded that area with apoxy to prevent a leak when the current o-rung goes bad. But I wonder if this allows an internal leak
 

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Both my '05 Arc and my wife's '04 Arc wagons started slowly leaking coolant at about the same time. Her car (The Mighty Thor) started leaking about a week before mine but it's due to go into the garage for a series of much needed repairs anyway so I just kept adding water to it. When mine (The Muttmobile) started leaking at about the same rate I guessed that it must be the heater control valve. I have been through this before with my '03 Linear and '03 Aero. After pulling the cover off the wiring connector and probing around between the engine and firewall, my suspicions were confirmed. I ordered a pair of the valves from eEuroparts. However I drive quite a bit more than the wife and the new parts will probably not be here before the end of the week so I decided to try pulling the offending part off and attempting to plug the leak. I seem to remember trying this before with little success. I decided to try harder this time. The last time I simply squished some five minute epoxy around the part that seems to be press-fitted into the end - the part that the bottom hose connects to. This is the only place it can leak. There are no open seams or cracks anywhere else. I used liquid epoxy made by J B Weld formulated for plastics. I cleaned it with alcohol and blew it dry with compressed air - twice. Then I used sand paper and a wire wheel to rough up the surface. Once the liquid epoxy set, I applied epoxy putty - again, made by J B Weld: "Water Weld". It's formulated to be used on plumbing.

I let the epoxys set up overnight and I'll be putting it back on in a few minutes. My plan is to leave it on as long as possible to see how long this repair holds while keeping the new part in the glove compartment just in case.
Update: It didn't work. I may have even made it worse. Drat! I went for a drive of approximately 100 miles today and had to refill the overflow tank three times. Apparently the coolant is under enough pressure to simply push around both layers of epoxy. When the new valves come in, I'm going to cut one of the old ones open and see if I can pull apart the part with the O-ring on it and replace it then epoxy it back together - as an experiment and to have as a spare. .
 

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I spent a lot of time researching bypass valves when concocting one for my '62 Falcon, and now having a 9-5 my interested in rekindled... :)

I wonder if a valve from some other car could be adapted... it's not complicated. In the case of the 9-5, just a vacuum solenoid that causes manifold vacuum to act on a valve that bypasses the core. BMW uses a valve with a built-in motor to perform a similar task:

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I wonder if the driver in the ACC could drive the motor... if not, probably a relay could solve the issue. Mercedes and Volvo have something similar.

My Jaguar (and IIRC Audi) actually use a motor to circulate coolant through the pump, and when the motor is off it bypasses. That could be another approach. I can't quickly find a picture of the whole assembly, just the Bosch pump. But it's a fun device. :)
 

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2004 9-5 Arc 2.3T B
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Update: It didn't work. I may have even made it worse. Drat! I went for a drive of approximately 100 miles today and had to refill the overflow tank three times. Apparently the coolant is under enough pressure to simply push around both layers of epoxy. When the new valves come in, I'm going to cut one of the old ones open and see if I can pull apart the part with the O-ring on it and replace it then epoxy it back together - as an experiment and to have as a spare. .
Here's a $57 OEM replacement. 90566947 by OES | By-pass Valve I love the effort but save yourself from yourself. (y)
 

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Now THAT'S funny...simply. 😁
Why? It's not a complicated device. It either feeds the core or bypasses it. There are plenty to choose from, and ACC doesn't know the thing exists so there isn't even any software required for anything you might wanna do. I don't immediately see where the difficulty would be.
 

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I don't immediately see where the difficulty would be.
You right it most likely wouldn't be difficult, but you can replace it for fifty bucks, I have had one single valve fail (thoroughly jinxing myself here) in 20 years of Saab 9-5 ownership.

It failed at my work warehouse on a 1999 high mileage base model, I called Karl at Scandinavian Auto and asked him if I needed to have it towed home (fifteen minute drive), he said "loosen the expansion tank cap and drive home" did that and had the new valve in next day.

That old rocket science thing... 😁
 

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Update: It didn't work. I may have even made it worse. Drat! I went for a drive of approximately 100 miles today and had to refill the overflow tank three times.

Had two of these valves leak (OEM parts) on my 56K mile car in the time I've owned it.
I had enough and bought this euro hose kit. Very happy about it.
Vac line plugs can be bought at almost any auto parts store.

 

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I'm a little confused, your car has 56,000 miles on it or you have put that mileage on it?

I bet that now I'm in this discussion I'm going to have numerous CBV failures for the next seven point five months.
The car is a 2008 with 56K miles total. I put about 30K on it in the past 9 years as the second owner.
Get the euro bypass hoses. You'll never notice the valve missing in Canada. :)
 

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You'll never notice the valve missing in Canada. :)
Wow, she's hardly broken it yet.

You'd be surprised at how humid it gets here and I believe the valve does actually have an effect.

I only put about 5,000 kilometers a year on my car, I'll probably replace it and risk the next ten years. (y)
 

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Why? It's not a complicated device. It either feeds the core or bypasses it. There are plenty to choose from, and ACC doesn't know the thing exists so there isn't even any software required for anything you might wanna do. I don't immediately see where the difficulty would be.
ACC knows if the solenoid to operate the valve is attached or not. If you just rip out all the gubbins, the ACC will show an error code for the solenoid when the system is calibrated. At least the 1998-2005 ACC.
 
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