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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Yesterday I was trying to separate the transmission from the shifter linkage in my white 900. I spent way too much time with a drift trying to persuade the pin to come out. All I got was to break its threaded end off. :x

Can't say I am very happy with myself but now I need to remove the old pin. What would you suggest? And, which material is the pin made of?
 

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I had a very tough time getting this out as well, mainly because as you perform shifting, the linkage rod bites into the pin and eventally makes a groove there. It makes it very hard to remove, and I had to get creative to do this. In my case, the nut was gone, the pin was still there, and the thread was intact.

What I eventually came up with is to use a bottle jack, a couple bricks to do coarse bottle height adjustments, and a long 3/8" drive extension bar, and some type of cheater bar. Using the bricks, bottle jack, and extension bar, I raised the jack underneath the car using the bricks, and used the jack to push the extension bar against the pin from below, with enough pressure that it started to push the engine upwards slightly. This was a bit tricky because the pin was at an angle, but that's why an extension bar was used, so that the angle can be fine tuned. Once that was in place and holding, I went above, and using the cheater bar (make sure it's long enough, and has two edges on it so that they can be placed on each side of the pin, ie. a hollow bar) I placed the bar around the pin on top of the linkage. Then, with a single smack with the 3-lb hammer, the pin got pushed flush with the linkage from the bottom, and it was freed from the linkage.

In effect, the bottle jack assembly was used as an anvil. Simply put, the linkage alone does not have enough structural strength to have the pin forced out against it when tapping at the pin with a drift from underneath. In your case, if you can replace the extension bar with something similar but can follow the pin through the hole when force is placed downwards on the linkage around the pin, then that would work equally well.

Hope this helps! :D

li Arc
 

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Don't bother! Just undo the clamp and pull it straight out (like put the car in 4th, undo the clamp and put the stick in 3rd) It is a good idea to realign the works anyway. Once the tranny is out you can work on it much easier, or if it is still really jammed, leave it there :p
 

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I also typically remove that linkage coupler WITH the transmission. As suggested, I typically put the car in 4th, loosen the clamp, then put it in third rapidly and the shaft pops right out. As for replacing it, I'd suggest that you get a new one from one of the Saab parts suppliers. They're not too expensive. The trick to getting them out easier without damaging the selector shaft is to have a "C" clamp and a 1/2" spacer with a hole in the middle for the pin to move into. You put the spacer over the pin, then put pressure against the nut (threaded to the end of the shaft) until it just pops out. That's how I do it anyways, don't know if it's textbook. Easier done once the tranny is out of the car of course. ;)
 

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Anyone ever try a MOTORCYCLE chain breaker? One that would push out a 630 chain might be able to pop out a broken pin, and there are several that are ratchet type for limited clearance.
 

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Anyone ever try a MOTORCYCLE chain breaker? One that would push out a 630 chain might be able to pop out a broken pin, and there are several that are ratchet type for limited clearance.
I would think even that's too small to get around the shaft and pop the pin...I used a combination of wd-40, propane torch, a 2" c-clamp tightened successively over day, and pure violence.
 

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I just did the exact same thing. Mushroomed it bad then broke it off.

I drilled the pin out.

Center punched the area where the threads broke off.

Drilled whatever size was slightly smaller than the threads.

Drilled about 3/4 of the way through, slid a drift in tapped it with a hammer. Popped right out.

Whole ordeal took 15 minutes. Hope I can buy a new pin assembly.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
The trick to getting them out easier without damaging the selector shaft is to have a "C" clamp and a 1/2" spacer with a hole in the middle for the pin to move into. You put the spacer over the pin, then put pressure against the nut (threaded to the end of the shaft) until it just pops out. That's how I do it anyways, don't know if it's textbook. Easier done once the tranny is out of the car of course. ;)
Sad thing that is what I originally used that the first time I had to do it (two years ago),

It worked out really nice once I was able to line everything up (it kept falling off). When I tried to do it this time, I just could not make the socket line up just right and the swivel piece on the end of the threaded part of the c-clamp to stay on the nut. I was rather pissed and went to the drift+hammer technique... and bent it.

I think I will get a socket I do not mind destroying and make a groove on it about the same shape as the coupler. And then welding it to the clamp. And then making a little pocket/seat on the swivel head on the clamp so the nut can just stay there instead of walking off.


I just did the exact same thing. Mushroomed it bad then broke it off.

I drilled the pin out.

Center punched the area where the threads broke off.

Drilled whatever size was slightly smaller than the threads.

Drilled about 3/4 of the way through, slid a drift in tapped it with a hammer. Popped right out.

Whole ordeal took 15 minutes. Hope I can buy a new pin assembly.
I think that is what I will end up doing. Sounds like the least annoying thing to do. A new pin assemply is cheap: http://www.eeuroparts.com/Main/PartDetail.aspx?id=4776274K

Now, I have the old style selector shaft coupler thingie,

Does anyone know the part number for the new style one?
 

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The new coupler is PN 4279634. It's about $80-$90. PM me and I'll send you one for about the cost of shipping instead.
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
mmoe, thanks for sending the coupler! Now I need to get the pin and put it in. And line up the shifter with the transmission again. :roll:

crwchf01, the tool worked fine; I just had to shave it a bit so it could line up flush against the old coupler (and the pin) and we were good to go.

 

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mmoe, thanks for sending the coupler! Now I need to get the pin and put it in. And line up the shifter with the transmission again. :roll:
If you have access to even a little bit of compressed air, an air hammer that costs less than $20 is the best way to get these pins out. It fits in tight spaces and pops out the pin effortlessly.

PB
 

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Only problem with air hammers is if you go too far, the pin goes (ping,tink, tink ) and may not be easy to find. The bike chain tool lets you ease it out and has the added bonus of breaking endless chains on the timing. Also is handy if you ride motorcycles:cheesy:. Also I believe there is an adapter to let you set the pin on a replacement chain. I get along better with 3X and4X rivet guns. They provide a measured blow from soft to full on.
 

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Only problem with air hammers is if you go too far, the pin goes (ping,tink, tink ) and may not be easy to find. The bike chain tool lets you ease it out and has the added bonus of breaking endless chains on the timing. Also is handy if you ride motorcycles:cheesy:. Also I believe there is an adapter to let you set the pin on a replacement chain. I get along better with 3X and4X rivet guns. They provide a measured blow from soft to full on.
True, I had to be careful about that. I have a motorcycle chain tool from my timing chain roll-in replacement so I'll try that next time.

Does anyone know why Saab changed the rubber isolator thing (pics in one of the above posts) on the later models? Does the new isolator improve shifting by reducing side loads? Seems that a friend's '94 CE convertible that I drove shifted very well compared to the 80s cars, even though it had a pile of miles on it. I know that the transmission internals changed a bit, but does this new-style linkage help shift quality?
 

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Don't know about shifting better, but it permits replacement of the rubber bushing without having to remove the coupling.
 

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I believe it was said that the new style coupler allowed for the linkage to unhinge properly to slide the transmission under the car in the event of a head-on collision. However, based on how the linkage was designed, I wondered if somehow the two pieces were reversed, because it looks the opposite.

I noticed a performance auto parts store in town with 'general purpose' universal joints, with varying sizes. They cost roughly $80 and I have heard of the coupler being replaced by a u-joint (in Vince T's case). However, in his method this u-joint was welded onto the linkage. The u-joints at the performance auto shop are not clampable, but they use the sunken allen-screw type mechanism to secure the u-joint to the shaft. This would be easy enough to make work with the transmission side (with the screw going through the transmission selector rod as well), but I'm not sure if it could be tightened enough on the linkage end to ensure longevity unless one were to either drill a bit of a hole on the linkage to do the same thing as the shift selector rod, or cut slots into the u-joint to allow the use of clamps (if the thickness of the material isn't too thick).

This one looks like it's easier to use, with the clamps on both ends...

Vince had mentioned that after the upgrade, plus a 4-speed transmission, the car shifted like a rifle bolt. I think the rubber coupler takes a lot of the feel away, but it's necessary as the linkage is stationary while the engine/transmission is allowed some vertical movement. Hence a u-joint would fit the bill well as well.

li Arc
 

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with all your probs with hard to get out taper pins, the one on my sons dropped out one day, so was stuck in third, but being as he needed the car for work and you have to wait for taper pins..order...post etc, I drilled a hole for a 5 or 6 mm spring pin, and tapped that into place worked perfect
 
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