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Well, I've been reading some old posts, and can gather that most of you around here use synthetic oil (or that's how it sounds). My question is this: I've heard that if your car used to run on standard oil, it might be a bad idea to switch to synthetic. How valid is this? Has anyone experienced a problem in the past using/switching to synth? I don't know what my car used to run on, as I just bought it... so I'm a little tentative to try synthetic, for fear of...well, I don't even know what I'm fearing right now ;oops:. Thanks!!
 

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Discussion Starter #3
Well, it runs great, its a 1988 and has only 129K on it... So I guess I'm using synth, then!
 

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i have been using mobil 1 for quite a while now......my schedule is: filter change every 15000 miles, oil change every 5000 miles........it works for me. btw...the best filter that i have ever seen is made by Baldwin. i have used them on all my units....ie: 100000 miles on a 1979 harley davidson shovelhead.....that just doesn't happen.....

allen
92 900s vert
 

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Wellll.. this IS a religious topic.. Seems everyone with a 15 yr old car with at least a 100,000miles onna clock (Long past the sell by date for most normal Humans :) Sooner or later decides that their new to them 'baby' Now deserves Synthetic' Oils.
Have at it Mate .:) Although realise that most if not all of these cars got to their old age on Regular oils.. and REGULAR oil/filter changes.
Couple of points: Saabs especially Turbos NEED 15w40 to adequately lube the cam Lobes under Boost... thinner Viscosities have proven a poor choice .
Some Feel that the Higher priced Additive package in Synth oils allows longer Oil Change intervals.. OK so leave it in longer
BUT be aware that the Filter NEEDS changing at 3k miles/5k Kms Regardless.. or all yr beilfs re Synth Goodness is pur Fantasy . Your old Engine is still producing copius amounts of Combustion Byproducts.. and those tiny Black Bits Still get into the oil( regardless of Type.. and clog the Filter surprisingly quickly.
 

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When I switched to Mobil 1 full synthetic my engine developed a bit of an oil leak. I compromised and switched to Valvoline Durablend. Its a synthetic blend oil. Oil leaks went away and I still have the added security and peace of mind of synthetic oil.
 

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Basre said:
Saabs especially Turbos NEED 15w40 to adequately lube the cam Lobes under Boost... thinner Viscosities have proven a poor choice .
News to me and no doubt many others who have successfully used anything from 0W40 to 10W30 (which the owners manual recommends). You'll find that your climate has a part to play as well. I'm currently running 5W30 very happily.

BUT be aware that the Filter NEEDS changing at 3k miles/5k Kms Regardless
This again has a slightly misleading authority to it. Certainly change it often, but every 3000 miles is a very conservative figure. Many turbos are quite happy with an oil and filter change every 5000 miles. I personally would not leave it any longer than that.

As you'll see by doing a search, there's a huge amount of opinion on the subject, including many people that swear the way they do it is gospel. What is likely is that if you switch to a fully synth now you may get a bit more leakage. As long as you aren't losing too much this is not a problem.
 

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"Turbos NEED 15w40 to adequately lube the cam Lobes under Boost" - huh? - the 15W is irrelevent as you should not be bosting on a cold engine - 0W will flow quicker and better than a 15W on a cold start and is therefore far better. 40 or 30 are Saab's recomended running temp viscosity ratings - lubricant protection has more to do with the actual film strength and quality of the oil rather than the viscosity. You should run a fully synthetic on a turbo car regardless of engine age if you want to keep the turbo going for as long as possible as it does not contain the viscosity modifiers that coke the bearings.
 

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My experiance with switching over to synthetic oil in my '81 900t8v was a long waited one this car was bought by my dad new in 1981 and he was one to use the best available products whenever possible. His oil of choice was AMSOIL 10w30 in winter and 10w40 in summer.When I got the car at 299,000mi. I had the front and rear oil seals replaced including the entire oil pump assy. I did not find it economically feasible to continue the use of AMSOIL so I switched over to Castrol Synthetic 10w30 and 10w40 and used an engine treatment called RESTORE 4cyl. this was back in 1991 the car currently has 686,454 miles on it without having any major internal components changed including the head. My advice to you is if your engine has no leaks now use the synthetic blend or the next time you do a clutch change the rear seal and change the crank pulley seal while your at it then switch to fully synthetic oil of your choice and enjoy the significantly cooler operating temps.:D
 

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Vegging Up

My understanding on this topic is as follows with regard to switching from mineral to synthetic oil. Changing over without cleaning the engine can lead to the remaining mineral oil to turn gooey and form lumps in a process that was described to me as 'vegging up'. I don't know how much truth there is to this, if you guys haven't had any problems then fine. But with the low cost of flushing oil I personally don't risk it. Changing the other way, I'm told, presents no problems. Giving an engine a good flush every once in a while is certainly a good idea, as shown by the immediate discolouration of the flush. I do it with all my new cars.

Also, a note of caution to those of you with older, more worn engines. Synthetic oil is far better at finding its way around and as mentioned this can lead to leaks. On an engine prone to this a slightly thicker mineral oil is possibly a better choice.
 

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"can lead to the remaining mineral oil to turn gooey and form lumps" - nonsense - modern synthetics are designed to mix perfectly with mineral oils.The only synthetic oils which can do this are not available for domestic automotive use. "Synthetic oil is far better at finding its way around and as mentioned this can lead to leaks. On an engine prone to this a slightly thicker mineral oil is possibly a better choice." the first generation of synthetic were prone to leaking - not the modern stuff. Your turbo is going to cost a hell of a lot more to replace than a few engine seals or a bit of oil lost every few 1000 miles - if you run a turbo car you are daft not to use and reap the benefits of synthetic.
 

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Like I said, I wasn't too sure about it. I had a look on the forum where I read about and apparently the problem is that the synthetic oil cleans out all the deposits and carbon leading to very dirty oil.

If you want to know about oil go and have a read here...
http://forums.tdiclub.com/ubbthreads.php?Cat=&C=2

These boys are absolutely religious on the topic of oils. They send samples of their oil off for analysis every 5k or whatever. Register and do a search for "changing to synthetic" or something similar. Ok, I know it is a diesel related forum so some stuff won't apply, but it is interesting reading all the same.
 

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syn oils - YES

synthetic oils easily mix with mineral types - in fact both castrol and quaker sell syn/mineral oil blends - i've used this type as early as 1990 - i've also used full syn oil in at least 6 new cars that came with mineral oils from the oem - my Saab is the only one to come with full syn from the factory - i generally change both oil and filter at 5 or 6K miles . i have never had any "lumps" floating around in my engine ( it's motor oil not turkey gravy). another old wives tale is that once you use syn oil you can never go back to mineral types - this is also pure rubbish. two caveats - older engines may have seals that are not compatible with syn oils and may seep a little oil - this happens because all motor oils are at least one third additives and one or two of them keep the seals from drying out and cause them to swell slightly so they stay nice and tight as they wear - all recently manufactured engines have compatible seals. the second is on a rebuilt engine use mineral types for the initial break in period - as the reduced coefficient of friction that syn oils cause may extend the time needed for the rings and bearings to properly seat and scuff in. i will never go back to mineral oils again .
 
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