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Discussion Starter #1
There's a video on eeuroparts about how to do this with the polyurethane bushings Mine needed to be done so I figured I'd give it a try. I've done the subframe out process on my other 9-5 a couple of years ago so thought that I'd share my thoughts on the differences

I would say that if you have a lift this would be a nearly trivial exercise. Doing it on the garage floor is a bit harder since you have to get the car up high enough to get a sawzall into the bushing to cut out the metal and to be able to see.

the process starts by unbolting the rear and middle subframe bolts and loosening the front ones to allow the rear of the subframe to hang down. I also had to un-bolt the rear motor mount to get a little more room and disconnect the rubber mounts for the exhaust so that the exhaust wasn't holding up the subframe. Then use a hole saw to cut the rubber parts out of the bushings and then the sawzall to cut the metal bushings so that you can pry them out. Once you get everything out you put the greased up poly bushings without the center sleeve in them on top of the subframe and use a jack to push the subframe against the car to push the bushing into place.

The rear ones were pretty easy the frame drops down low enough to get everything done pretty easy
The middle ones were a bit more difficult, I had to use a pry bar to get the frame far enough apart from the body to get the old bushings out and the new ones in

Once you do those, slide the sleeves into the bushings, put the included washer on top and then you put the bolts back in the rear, tight enough to hold the subframe up and take the bolts out of the front and do the same there. Then tighten up all of the bolts, make sure you put the washers on top and the sleeves into the bushings.

All in it took me about 4 hours to do the job, I didn't have any rusted bolts or any real issues getting the old bushings out (some of them were pretty much falling out) When I did the subframe out it took me about 8-10 hours to do the job so this was definitely an improvement.
 

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There's a video on eeuroparts about how to do this with the polyurethane bushings Mine needed to be done so I figured I'd give it a try. I've done the subframe out process on my other 9-5 a couple of years ago so thought that I'd share my thoughts on the differences

I would say that if you have a lift this would be a nearly trivial exercise. Doing it on the garage floor is a bit harder since you have to get the car up high enough to get a sawzall into the bushing to cut out the metal and to be able to see.

the process starts by unbolting the rear and middle subframe bolts and loosening the front ones to allow the rear of the subframe to hang down. I also had to un-bolt the rear motor mount to get a little more room and disconnect the rubber mounts for the exhaust so that the exhaust wasn't holding up the subframe. Then use a hole saw to cut the rubber parts out of the bushings and then the sawzall to cut the metal bushings so that you can pry them out. Once you get everything out you put the greased up poly bushings without the center sleeve in them on top of the subframe and use a jack to push the subframe against the car to push the bushing into place.

The rear ones were pretty easy the frame drops down low enough to get everything done pretty easy
The middle ones were a bit more difficult, I had to use a pry bar to get the frame far enough apart from the body to get the old bushings out and the new ones in

Once you do those, slide the sleeves into the bushings, put the included washer on top and then you put the bolts back in the rear, tight enough to hold the subframe up and take the bolts out of the front and do the same there. Then tighten up all of the bolts, make sure you put the washers on top and the sleeves into the bushings.

All in it took me about 4 hours to do the job, I didn't have any rusted bolts or any real issues getting the old bushings out (some of them were pretty much falling out) When I did the subframe out it took me about 8-10 hours to do the job so this was definitely an improvement.
Nice work. I will say that I ended up taking it to my mechanic to do this job, as (at the time) it was cold and I didn't feel like laying on a cold/wet garage floor. They charged me 2.5 hours of labor, so 4 hours for the "advanced DIY'er" sounds about right.

It's hard to compare old/worn/shot OEM bushings to aftermarket poly ones, but what are your thoughts on the driving/handling so far? I definitely notice tighter/better handling and improved road feel, at the expense of more NVH especially as the car accelerates through the gears. I also have a poly bushing in the "dog bone" / torque arm auto transmission mount, so that may be contributing to that as well.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
I'm noticing a bit more vibration from the engine than before, but that could be because the bushings were shot.

If I had done this on a lift I could have been done in two hours, hell it probably took me a half hour to jack,, block, jack, block and re-jack to get the car high enough (I had the back end on my drive-up ramps and the front was on my jack stands on the jack points, jack stands sitting on two 2x8's with the jack stands all the way up)

If only I could find the source of my "clunk" (see other thread) I'd be happy. Now on to the engine pull to fix the leak.
 

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I tried polys in my upper and lower control arms. While my estate handled better, the travel suffered: the ride was jarring. MFG replaced the polys once I took pics to show they deteriorated, but after < 5K I took them out and went back to OEM. I asked my SAAB trained Indy about doing the dog bone, he said it would cause more vibration
 

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What is the consensus over vibration and harshness when only replacing the rear two subframe mounts with polyurethane?
 

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Quick update: I don't think I've ever mentioned this, but I had also put the Powerflex poly bushings into my dogbone mount. I found that reverting the dogbone to OEM rubber (while still having the poly subframe bushings) really helped with the overall harshness. So if you have the poly subframe bushings I'd recommend sticking with the OEM dogbone mount. I think the polyurethane subframe bushings + everything else being OEM feels great. The vibration and engine noise are still harsher than stock, but I think it's worth the tradeoff.
 

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Even by today's standards there still isn't much to compare a SAAB's ride quality to. Sure, tech has come an extremely long way and even econoboxes ride amazing and great. However, the heavy feel of the steering and the solid planting and feeling of driving on rails these (and older German cars) do, its very hard to find a new car that feels like a well maintained 9-5. Everything in my opinion is either too light, electronically assisted, or full of lies. There is always a trade off somewhere. When I heard SAAB wouldnt let NEVS use the SAAB name or badge I was hoping they were planning a comeback eventually. Who knows.. we can dream right?
 

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If only I could find the source of my "clunk" (see other thread) I'd be happy. Now on to the engine pull to fix the leak.
Did you ever find the source of this? I have this issue and I already did the passenger side motor mount and torque rod (dog bone). I'm thinking maybe transmission mount next, but not sure.
 

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Discussion Starter #12
Did you ever find the source of this? I have this issue and I already did the passenger side motor mount and torque rod (dog bone). I'm thinking maybe transmission mount next, but not sure.
yea, I did. it was the wheel bearing. Not a sound like any other wheel bearing that I've ever heard. there was no "rolling" noise with this one but it was shot and the race was moving back and forth when the load shifted when backing and turning. Really weird.
 
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