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Discussion Starter #1
Hi

My first post here. I dearly need some help from you kind folks.

I have a 1992 Saab turbo 16v which I have been giving love and attention to for the last 5 years. It drives really well. Body, engine, and interior in great condition.

Over the last few months the clutch pedal has developed a 'bumb' or a 'notch' or a 'lumb' halfway through when I release it. You feel it in your foot. Only when you release it.

When the car is cold and everything is not up to pressure and I change gear, the gear get stuck or jumps when I try to change, and the car sometimes stalls. I have to turn off the ignition to get it out of gear.

When it is hot it drives like it is brand new. No problems with the clutch, gears or driving whatsoever.

I bled the clutch a few days ago and lots of dirty oil came out. But that did not solve the problem.

Any ideas what is going here ?

Many thanks in advance for any advice given.
 

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Statistically, there's a 78.7% chance you have a worn Slave cylinder, 8.4% chance of a worn Master cylinder, 3.2% rusty clutch shaft, and 1.3% bad line. The rest is worn pedal and unknown.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
Thanks for that..

My instinct it is the pedal.

It is like the pedal is catching.

If I push in and out the pedal without starting the car I can feel the 'lump' (can't think of a better word than 'lump') on the clutch pedal return. But it happens randomly. Sometimes/most of the time it does not happen.

The 'lumpy' feel throws/catches the gear (sometimes) when driving it......when the car is cold.

It is very difficult to describe.

Other than that it drives fine.
 

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The clutch pedal engages the master cylinder with a clevis pin, and the spot where the pin passes through the pedal commonly wears. I don't think I've ever had a c900 where it wasn't all ovaled out... If it gets bad enough, it creates slop and notchiness. If you can wiggle the pedal around with your hand, it's worn. Repair consists of drilling out the pedal and pressing in a bushing.

The wear can also be on the "fork" of the master cylinder, but that's less common IMHO.

Unfortunately, when it comes to something like this you're going to have to get in there and look at the pieces of the system... not much use in an internet diagnosis.
 

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Discussion Starter #7
The clutch pedal engages the master cylinder with a clevis pin, and the spot where the pin passes through the pedal commonly wears. I don't think I've ever had a c900 where it wasn't all ovaled out... If it gets bad enough, it creates slop and notchiness. If you can wiggle the pedal around with your hand, it's worn. Repair consists of drilling out the pedal and pressing in a bushing.

The wear can also be on the "fork" of the master cylinder, but that's less common IMHO.

Unfortunately, when it comes to something like this you're going to have to get in there and look at the pieces of the system... not much use in an internet diagnosis.
Thanks for your reply.

I am convinced it is the pedal now. I can wiggle it about. But I don't really know how much 'wiggle' is normal.

If you find two minutes could you explain more about 'repair consists of drilling out the pedal and pressing in a bushing'

I think I might start with that.

Since bleeding the clutch, the gears change perfectly when the pedal does not catch.

I sure it is not a clutch problem in terms of the clutch itself.
 

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For pedal repair, you need to remove the pedal. Now you need a bushing (steel or simmilar hard material) with inner diameter same size as pin diameter. Drill the pedal where original bushing was - with a drill same size as outer bushing diameter you have. Insert bushing and weld it...
Old 8v exhaust stud spacers are perfect for the job (not sure if same as on 16v but ithey should be). Obviously, you will need to cut spacer/bushing to match pedal width,
 

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Clutch master.....internal plunger return spring collapsed?


A regular pattern of events with the clutch system on these cars is that as soon as one item is repaired or altered, the the next weakest item shows up and fails.....repair that and then the next weakest item is exposed.....<repeat>.....

All items previously mentioned will be worn to some degree.
Pedal linkage slop and springs fatigue - the depth of the master cyl plunger stroke slowly becomes shorter over the years, which directly relates to the depth of the slave cyl movement.
Repairing/replacing the clevis pin, return spring, replacing (or repairing) the master can restore the full length of the master cyl stroke. This will displace the slave cyl into areas not exercised for a long time.....slave cyl then tends to begin leaking or breakdown......replace the slave cyl and the hydraulic hose tends to breakdown from being disturbed and the effects of renewed line pressure from the new brake fluid and bleeding etc.......
RH cars are a nightmare with the clevis linkage and pedel shaft pivot bearings creating many areas of pedal fatigue.
Get it all sorted and the clutch feels fantastic.
 

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Discussion Starter #11
OK, it is not the pedal. Took it apart and everything is fine. It looks brand new to be fair. The hole for the pin is perfect.

Now, when you depress and release the clutch (engine off) is squeaks at the clutch in the engine bay. Like rubbing plastic. Not the clutch itself but the housing. It is not a mechanical squeak.

So is something plastic catching there which can be lubricated with a spray ? Something is catching !!!

It must be noted that I don't drive the car that much at the moment....so it is left standing still looking pretty in our cour most of the time.

The car will be mothballed for the winter which is why I want to get to the bottom of this problem.

The car is a renovation that will ultimately be my main car.

I still think the clutch is fine as it drives perfectly.

NB..the timing chain will be done next year (it rattles a bit on start up) so I will replace the clutch anyway when the engine comes out.

In the meantime any other thoughts ?
 

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I would remove clutch plastic cover and check if the throwout bearing on the slave cylinder has frozen up. Squeaking could be from rubber on back side of throwout bearing or from slave cylinder rotating its seals. If this is the case, vibration often is felt through depressed clutch pedal.
 

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Discussion Starter #14
#1 It's no easier to do the clutch with the engine out.
#2 Why would you take the engine out to do a timing chain?
If you take the engine out, you may as well do the clutch at the same time. No ? I don't know the answer to that question BTW.

Regarding the timing chain on a c900, well that is a debate that I have been reading about for a few years on different forums. Some say change some say don't. Some say it will never break.

I assume you are talking about feeding in a new chain/ chain link in ???

I don't really know if I should bother doing the timing chain to be fair. Everyone has an opinion on this matter. LOL.

Since buying the car 7 years ago, I change the oil every year. (I am not sure the previous owner did that) Every time I change the oil, the chain rattle becomes less.

At the end of the day, I want everything done properly. Money is not the problem here.

I live in France so it is very difficult to find someone who knows about these things.

The car is LHD.
 

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Before jumping into repairs, it's important to physically look at problems. Remove the clutch cover, see what's squeaking. Pull off the valve cover, check cam position and remove the timing chain tensioner and check for extension. Then you know if the chain is stretched and needs to be replaced. Anything else is just guesses!
 

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Everyone has an opinion. Some opinions are better than others.
Under warranty, SAAB would not pay to remove the engine for timing chain repairs, so SAAB thought it should be done in place. SAAB also suggests feeding in a new chain unless you have a reason to believe there's a problem with the guides.
Because it was my job, I read every Service Bulletin SAAB ever issued for the c900 (except body repair). I have a good memory.
I find it much easier to replace the clutch in the car, where you can use the hydraulics to compress the clutch.
SAAB changed the chain supplier about 1990, the newer chains are very durable.
 
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