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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I've been experiencing an intermittent annoying issue with my 2007 9-3. The car will not completely start up after turning the key. It sounds like it will but then it doesn't quite get there. It's kinda like trying to start a car that just ran out of gas - sounds good for a second then dies. I asked the service adviser about it and he recommended that I up the gasoline from regular.

Wondering if that is sound advice and if it will take care of my issue?:confused:
 

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so you run 87 in your car? I would at least go with 89, the manual states a minimum octane of 91. Ive never, never let even a drop of 87 in my car.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Yeah I know. I'll begrudgingly start doing going with 91 (i'm cheap). But will it resolve my start up issue? Also, is it better to use a Name Brand gas like Shell or Texaco than let's say Cosco?
 

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The manual for my 2006 2.0T states minimum of 87 octane, with 90 recommended for optimum performance. check your manual. I doubt this is the cause of your problem, but anything's possible.
 

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I asked the service adviser about it and he recommended that I up the gasoline from regular.

Wondering if that is sound advice and if it will take care of my issue?:confused:
This is pure stupid and reflects the common misconception that fuel with a higher octane rating is "more combustible," or whatever the ignorati tell themselves. For the record, lower octane gas is actually more volatile than high octane. High octane fuel is more compressible. This is its main benefit. It contains a higher proportion of non-straightchain hydrocarbons and burns at a lower temperature than lower octane fuels. Because high octane fuels can be squeezed tighter and burn slower, the engine can extract more power from the combustion. The key point is the engine must be designed to do so. But this has little to do with getting things started when you turn the key.

If you have a hard start it is far more likely to be caused by something other than fuel grade. Try a vacuum leak for starters. If you smell gas at start, perhaps a leaky injector.

A car like ours should really start right away unless there's a problem. Not all the minor problems generate diagnostic codes unfortunately.
 
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