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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
First off I'd like to preface this by saying I have searched the forum and read through the FAQs before deciding to start a new thread. Anyway, I've been a member here since last summer, leading up to and guiding me through my initial experiences with my 9-5. One new turbo and CPS later, and you really begin to appreciate the community here. From what I've gathered so far, it would be wise (for the sake of not getting stranded) to keep a spare DIC in the trunk, and possibly a CPS. Are there any other parts that are particularly failure prone and would warrant keeping a spare in the trunk?

Thanks for the feedback
 

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I have never carried a spare DI ever. I had one fail on my 2000 after owning the car for 4 years. Replaced by Saab due to a recall, at 56k miles. I have had that one on the car for 100K miles. My 2003 still has the original DI at 165K miles. ( Both also have the original CPS and fuel pump)

THe early DI cassettes had an issue, but it was redesigned and there are not any problems where they catastrophically fail like they did back then. Inspect yours and see the date of its manufacture, chances are its already been replaced
 

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I've always carried a spare DIC after needing to change it in an NG900 at 2 a.m. by the side of an interstate highway.

It's cheap insurance.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Gonna need to check mine

If it's one of the early revisions, I might as well pick a new one up now and keep in in the car just in case.

Thanks guys
 

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When you are changing hoses or belts it never hurts to toss a few of the better of the most common sizes, a small piece of pipe to step up or down and a few different size band clamps. Small diameter fuel hose can double as vacuum or for fuel. A golf tee or two to plug a leak.

One big one that always comes in very, very handy are a handful of those electrical ties, they are tough as hell and can hold even an exhaust off the ground if you use a piece of wood to act as a heat shield. I suppose you could even link a few together and make a short lived belt to keep something going (Saabs are too complex but for a simple Toyota it works).

A certain Navy guy I knew limped back to base with a leaky radiator. "They" had a case or two of beer in the car so it was put to use. Only after it was filtered through "their" kidneys first. :cheesy:
 

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Itr is an interesting question that in fact could be directed at any car driver driving any marque of car.

When I was younger I always carried a toolbox in the car wherever i went. It was assumed by many that the reason was that I drove a Jaguar but that wasn't the case at all. It was primarily habit :)

Anyway, I stopped doing that about 15yrs ago (maybe more) since I never needed to use it whilst travelling and I could use the space for other things.

For the last decade or so I have primarily driven a Saab ( 9000 or 9-5) and have carried nothing other than what came with the car from the factory.
How many breakdowns ?
None other than my wife just last week hit a pothole and got a puncture. The jack in the boot is a joke so she called me out and I went out with a proper jack and fitted the spare by the side of the road.

Maybe I have simply been lucky over the last 40yrs of driving , maybe not.
I understand why owners may carry a CPS or a DIC in particular but it should be remembered that you will also need the tools to fit a part if required and the supplied tools may not come up to scratch. I am not even sure it possible to change a battery with the supplied toolkit.
CPS for example is an item I would be very very surprised could be installed using nothing but the torx drivers in with the toolkit.

On the subject of tools to carry, there is one beyond all others that must must must be in the car and that is the alloy wheel locking key.
For those who have locking wheels nuts, the key is of no use whatsoever in a draw in the garage!
 

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Good quality Vise-Grips, a small needle and medium will let you lock onto just about anything. Avoid the cheap "Harbor Freight" Chinese junk.

You don't have to go crazy on a tool kit but good quality basics, In remote areas I've even tossed in a fully charged helper battery.

twotrubos, not many of us have a spare battery in the trunk so that's a bit academic. :cheesy:

You can usually swap fuses from a little used circuit but then they are so small a few fit in the ash tray. Oh! A small plank of wood so the jack doesn't sink on soft ground and a tow strap. Most of this stuff fits in a small kids school backpack.

Wintertime I keep a few of those cheap (or last year's) hand warmers. Stick them under your tee shirt by your kidneys and they will keep you alive.
 

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I've always carried a spare DIC after needing to change it in an NG900 at 2 a.m. by the side of an interstate highway.

It's cheap insurance.
Mine ( the old version) blew out int the parking lot of a bar after I picked up a cute little blondie and offered to give her a ride home after her friends took off.. had some fun in the car waiting for the tow truck, so no I WILL not put a spare in mine lol :cheesy:
 

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Don't forget the flash light (torch). Without that you will struggle to change a flat tire in the dark - ask me:roll: The LED types last forever is the way to go.
 

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I have never carried a spare DI ever. I had one fail on my 2000 after owning the car for 4 years. Replaced by Saab due to a recall, at 56k miles. I have had that one on the car for 100K miles. My 2003 still has the original DI at 165K miles. ( Both also have the original CPS and fuel pump)

THe early DI cassettes had an issue, but it was redesigned and there are not any problems where they catastrophically fail like they did back then. Inspect yours and see the date of its manufacture, chances are its already been replaced
You have had better luck than me. I had mine replaced during the recall and the "new" ones (v6) have failed after 50 K miles.

If you do store one in your trunk, keep it with the tips facing down so when you install it, all of the oil in it is in the proper place, othewise you will shorten the life of the DIC.
 

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Fluids (Oil, Coolant)
DIC - this is just my old one that never completely failed, it'll get me home
Duct Tape
Toolbox - make sure you've got Torx
Metal Coat Hangers - can be bent to be used in many different places
 

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Mine ( the old version) blew out int the parking lot of a bar after I picked up a cute little blondie and offered to give her a ride home after her friends took off.. had some fun in the car waiting for the tow truck, so no I WILL not put a spare in mine lol :cheesy:
Please be advised the topic at hand is about Direct Ignition Cassettes. It seems obvious you are not familiar with the mechanical details and nuances of Saab ownership.

;)
 

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When I was younger I always carried a toolbox in the car wherever i went. It was assumed by many that the reason was that I drove a Jaguar but that wasn't the case at all. It was primarily habit :)
I used to as well until I drove my MGB to a football game in Champagne-Urbana. I was from "the opposing team" and had a bumper sticker on the car. People broke into the car, stole damned near everything, slashed the rear window (the car was unlocked) and then picked the car up and turned it sideways.

I will say that I did get a chance to switch out some of my tools when that happened to reflect my current car ownership (insurance) but it was still a pain.
 
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