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Discussion Starter · #41 ·
I have an 07 95 Aero, and can tell you that the rear camber does make a difference. Mine were off a fraction on the RR, and ws burning through tires , right to the core, every 500 miles. Might be your problem.

What irks me is that those little shims are $136 for 4, from an OEM/dealer. You can get them from eEuroparts for $6, or make them yourself with SS 1" strapping from the hardware store for $1.25.
Yeah that's a ripoff from the dealer, to the surprise of no one lol. I think the "real" fix for the rear camber issues is to replace the worn trailing arm bushings and rose bushings, and if necessary replace sagging rear springs (and shocks of course). I did my trailing arm bushings recently. Rose bushings look more involved.
 

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Discussion Starter · #42 ·
Are you using the "Winter Mode" switch to prevent wheel spin on snow and ice as recommended by the owner's manual? Also, Is the TCS/ESP switch pressed in and the amber warning annunciator light on the instrument cluster is extinguished? The proper operation of these systems will have a HUGE effect on the car's stability in slippery conditions.
My car doesn't have the "W" button--they got rid of it at some point, not sure when, but the 06 model doesn't have it. That starts the transmission in 3rd gear which TBH I am not a huge fan of. I suppose I could use Manual mode and start off in third gear to achieve the same effect.

TCS/ESP is on by default. I can disable it by pushing the ESP (?) button but it always comes back on when the car is restarted. Turning it off/on works fine.
 

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Discussion Starter · #43 ·
“Feels unsafe”
Does this mean the car feels like it will over or under steer in snow? Does it slip or slide or lose traction more than it used to under identical conditions? Is the driving, handling change occur under dry conditions?
I explained this when I started the thread, but I'll paste a summary here again:

This winter season my car feels awful in the snow. It didn't used to be this way. For a FWD car I always thought the 9-5 was excellent in winter conditions. Not anymore. It feels downright dangerous even at safe speeds like 40 MPH on the smallest amount of snow or slush. The car wants to pull one way or another, I have to fight to keep it straight, and it feels like the backend really wants to sway. In snow/slush/ice, the car feels on the verge of going out of control even at low speed and in tiny amounts of snow. I dread driving it in the snow this year. On dry roads it is fine. The steering also feels looser and less precise than I would like.
 

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2006 saab 9-3
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Hey brain trust - this winter season my car feels awful in the snow. It didn't used to be this way. For a FWD car I always thought the 9-5 was excellent in winter conditions. Not anymore. It feels downright dangerous even at safe speeds like 40 MPH on the smallest amount of snow or slush. The car wants to pull one way or another, I have to fight to keep it straight, and it feels like the backend really wants to sway. In snow/slush/ice, the car feels on the verge of going out of control even at low speed and in tiny amounts of snow. I dread driving it in the snow this year. On dry roads it is fine. The steering also feels looser and less precise than I would like.

Please read the list below of what I have already done before making suggestions. Thanks.
  • I have snow tires. They are balanced with plenty of tread left.
  • The car was just aligned a couple months ago by a professional (alignment was done as a last step after suspension and steering parts were replaced.)
  • The rear shocks were replaced 40,000 miles ago.
  • All six front subframe bushings were replaced 30,000 miles ago.
  • The stabilizer links in the front were replaced with Moog ones.
  • The front struts were replaced about 20,000 miles ago (complete assembly with springs, OEM parts).
  • On both sides, I recently replaced the front control arms, all related bushings, and the ball joints.
  • Brakes and rotors are basically brand new all around.
  • I just replaced the rear trailing arm bushings with polyurethane ones.
The only things I can think of to check are the inner and outer tie rods, rose bushes in the rear, and looseness in the steering rack itself. Most everything in the front is new. Any other thoughts?
Something is off as my 06 9-3 is a beast with snow tires. Put it on lift to check all bushings an check your electronic stability controller system.
 

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Should I report all snowing to road authorizes that they come to remove all snow before I drive?
For what we pay road taxes? You pay with the number plate. And partially with customs on gas.

Okay, this will be a longer text;

Cause of symptoms could be the rear camber and worn rear axle carrier mounting bushes. And the intermediate tires.
Mechanical preparations to set camber on each rear wheel:

  • To adjust rear camber its needed to remove wheel air deflector handbrake attachment and
connector for the wheel sensor.
  • Blow clean around the wheel hub.

  • Undo the wheel hub nuts (4x) approx. 7 turns.

  • Use a 45 mm long 15 mm socket with 3/8" drive, part number 30 34 444, and an extension piece

  • Blow thoroughly clean in the space between the hub and link arm.
  • Fit a 0.3 mm shim top or bottom. Not thinner not thicker.
If the camber is too much towards +: Fit a shim at the bottom.

If the camber is too much upwards -: Fit a shim at the top.
A maximum of three shims may be fitted. (Tip: grease the shims and
surrounding faces with some
graphite-grease to prevent it from corrosion)

  • Tighten the hub nuts (4x)

    Tightening torque: 50 Nm +30°

Fit the wheel sensor cable to the mounting. Plug in the connector to the wheel sensor.
Fit the attachment for the handbrake cable.

Tightening torque: 8 Nm

Fit the air deflector. Fit the wheel. Apply the handbrake. Check wheel alignment.
Connect equipment for 4-wheel alignment and check for exact settings as shown in the table:



  • Adjusting rear toe angle:
  • Use a 4-column lift to raise the car so that the wheels are under pressure.
Fasten the longitudinal links with Fixture 89 96 795
  • Slightly undo the bolts to the body bracket of one of the longitudinal links.
  • Using Sleeve 89 96 811, move the bracket outwards or inwards. Move it inwards to increase toe-in.
Check the value.

  • Tighten the bolts.
Tightening torque 90 Nm +30° (70 lbf ft +30°)

  • Repeat steps 3-5 on the other side.

Treat the rust free body with corrosion protection like Mike Sanders, Innotec dry grease or, Dinitrol. Dinitrol is also good for axles to prevent from corrosion. Previous dry ice
blasting necessary for good adhesion.

Intermediate tires are a compromise of all season tires for approx. 60% warm conditions
and 40% cold environment conditions.
The respective braking distance deteriorates at low temperatures and at high temperatures
the tyre wear is significantly higher than on summer tyres only. Conversely, summer tyres
have poorer grip at temperatures below 8°C and their wear increases in square with cold.
Winter tyres do not grip well in warm conditions, especially in aquaplaning, and their wear
is higher at high temperatures above 10°. The other issue is lateral grip.


Enjoy the riding comfort.
 

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My car doesn't have the "W" button--they got rid of it at some point, not sure when, but the 06 model doesn't have it. That starts the transmission in 3rd gear which TBH I am not a huge fan of. I suppose I could use Manual mode and start off in third gear to achieve the same effect.

TCS/ESP is on by default. I can disable it by pushing the ESP (?) button but it always comes back on when the car is restarted. Turning it off/on works fine.
W button vanished when gearbox changed to 5 speed one.
 

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Discussion Starter · #50 ·
For what we pay road taxes? You pay with the number plate. And partially with customs on gas.

Okay, this will be a longer text;

Cause of symptoms could be the rear camber and worn rear axle carrier mounting bushes. And the intermediate tires.
Mechanical preparations to set camber on each rear wheel:

  • To adjust rear camber its needed to remove wheel air deflector handbrake attachment and
connector for the wheel sensor.
  • Blow clean around the wheel hub.

  • Undo the wheel hub nuts (4x) approx. 7 turns.

  • Use a 45 mm long 15 mm socket with 3/8" drive, part number 30 34 444, and an extension piece

  • Blow thoroughly clean in the space between the hub and link arm.
  • Fit a 0.3 mm shim top or bottom. Not thinner not thicker.
If the camber is too much towards +: Fit a shim at the bottom.

If the camber is too much towards -: Fit a shim at the top.
A maximum of three shims may be fitted. (Tip: grease the shims and
surrounding faces with some
graphite-grease to prevent it from corrosion)

  • Tighten the hub nuts (4x)

    Tightening torque: 50 Nm +30°

Fit the wheel sensor cable to the mounting. Plug in the connector to the wheel sensor.
Fit the attachment for the handbrake cable.

Tightening torque: 8 Nm

Fit the air deflector. Fit the wheel. Apply the handbrake. Check wheel alignment.
Connect equipment for 4-wheel alignment and check for exact settings as shown in the table:



  • Adjusting rear toe angle:
  • Use a 4-column lift to raise the car so that the wheels are under pressure.
Fasten the longitudinal links with Fixture 89 96 795
  • Slightly undo the bolts to the body bracket of one of the longitudinal links.
  • Using Sleeve 89 96 811, move the bracket outwards or inwards. Move it inwards to increase toe-in.
Check the value.

  • Tighten the bolts.
Tightening torque 90 Nm +30° (70 lbf ft +30°)

  • Repeat steps 3-5 on the other side.

Treat the rust free body with corrosion protection like Mike Sanders, Innotec dry grease or, Dinitrol. Dinitrol is also good for axles to prevent from corrosion. Previous dry ice
blasting necessary for good adhesion.

Intermediate tires are a compromise of all season tires for approx. 60% warm conditions
and 40% cold environment conditions.
The respective braking distance deteriorates at low temperatures and at high temperatures
the tyre wear is significantly higher than on summer tyres only. Conversely, summer tyres
have poorer grip at temperatures below 8°C and their wear increases in square with cold.
Winter tyres do not grip well in warm conditions, especially in aquaplaning, and their wear
is higher at high temperatures above 10°. The other issue is lateral grip.


Enjoy the riding comfort.
I don’t think I have access to any dry ice blasting, but I appreciate the encyclopedia of knowledge!
 

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172 Posts
2002 was the change to 5 speed automatic gearbox (5th is electric operated).
2005 had the W-button on Euro- (Check ads on Blocket) and GCC -models.

@Andy here many offer dry ice blasting also a "home service" - but you have
to operate it in a workshop. Or at least to rent the stuff with extensive operation
instructions. Maybe ColdJet can tell you an operator close to you.
 

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For what we pay road taxes? You pay with the number plate. And partially with customs on gas.
Okay, this will be a longer text;

Cause of symptoms could be the rear camber and worn rear axle carrier mounting bushes. And the intermediate tires.
Mechanical preparations to set camber on each rear wheel..........:
Or you could get a couple of these, they work great.

 

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Discussion Starter · #60 ·
Or you could get a couple of these, they work great.

That’s a good solution. It says it doesn’t work with the auto leveling headlights though, which I do have.

Wonder if I could rig up a workaround?
 
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