SaabCentral Forums banner

1 - 20 of 33 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
33 Posts
Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
1987 900 turbo convertible, kinda like the picture for the forum, actually.......

Did the usual, drained, removed the emissions and other nonsense to get to the thermostat housing, things going rather well, no issues whatsoever.....

SNAP! Dang, this bolt seems to move a lot easier now.....

Snapped off the upper bolt, lost a bit over what, a half or 3/4ths inch within the block. Been told everything from i'm screwed to go get yourself an extractor.

Bought extractor, with drill bit. Drill bit worked fine, a tad off center, but i get the tapper in and my drill's not strong enough to spin the bolt part out. Asked about the neighborhood and even the local construction site if they had a better drill, everyone came out with the bright orange toys you would basically get from fisher price.....

Is there a manual "handle" available? Some cheap fix? I haven't another vehicle available to me, a VERY thin budget, but a parts store within a mile away........

Bit of a newbie yutz, as you can probably already tell. ;oops:

Am I screwed because I am also off center as far as the drill hole, or is that not a big deal? Bit of a panic, she was overheating like hell beforehand, boiled the old thermo and found it opened around 250, so got a new one of those.

As a side note, I was told that in California, since it's so bloody hot here, that I would be best off sitting with a hacksaw and a pair of pliers and removing ALL moving parts from the OLD thermostat, and just installing the metal frame and a new seal? Does this sound right at all to anyone?

Thanks for any help at all.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
10,081 Posts
Mockles said:
Snapped off the upper bolt, lost a bit over what, a half or 3/4ths inch within the block.
Ooops...

Bought extractor, with drill. Drill worked fine, a tad off center, but i get the tapper in and the drill's not strong enough to spin the bolt part out.
Have you soaked it throughly in decent quality penetrating oil? Plenty of heat?

Am I screwed because I am also off center as far as the drill hole, or is that not a big deal?
It'll be a bugger if you get to the stage of trying to completely drill the old one out.

As a side note, I was told that in California, since it's so bloody hot here, that I would be best off sitting with a hacksaw and a pair of pliers and removing ALL moving parts from the OLD thermostat, and just installing the metal frame and a new seal? Does this sound right at all to anyone?
No. A working 'stat won't interfere with the flow of coolant when warm. What it WILL do, though, is to allow the car to warm up from cold properly. You _do_ have a season less hot than summer there, don'cha? <grin>

If the car's overheating with a good 'stat, then you've got other problems - probably a shagged rad.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,470 Posts
i thought all stud extractors came with manual handles or the like, so that you could get some good torque into them, nice and slowly without the fear of breaking anything suddently when using a powertool

G
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,078 Posts
1) Don't panic :cheesy:
2) Fill bolt hole with bit-o-bolt in it (with offcenter hole:roll: ) with penetrating oil
3) go do something else for a couple of hours
4) stick something down hole (screw driver, punch) and give it a couple raps with a hammer;)
5) insert extractor - attempt to use drill
6) if drill isn't strong enough see if you can use vice grips or something similar on the extractor shaft - but be careful - you DON'T want to break the tip of the extractor off in the off-center hole 3/4 of an inch below the surface ...
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
33 Posts
Discussion Starter #5
hmmm........

Have you soaked it throughly in decent quality penetrating oil? Plenty of heat?

Yes, all sorts of gooped up with that, but not so much as to end up in the actual thermostat area.

It'll be a bugger if you get to the stage of trying to completely drill the old one out.

You're operative word is "if" - I am trying not to get to that point, and I am not there already. Will it be of issue now, is my question.

No. A working 'stat won't interfere with the flow of coolant when warm. What it WILL do, though, is to allow the car to warm up from cold properly. You _do_ have a season less hot than summer there, don'cha? <grin>

His explanation was that it would end up overheating because of the heat here. With just the housing of the thermostat installed, he said it would be enough resistance.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,078 Posts
Mockles said:
His explanation was that it would end up overheating because of the heat here. With just the housing of the thermostat installed, he said it would be enough resistance.
if the purveyor of that advice is your mechanic, I'd find another.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
10,081 Posts
drg23 said:
i thought all stud extractors came with manual handles or the like, so that you could get some good torque into them, nice and slowly without the fear of breaking anything suddently when using a powertool
I was assuming he meant LH drill bit rather than stud extractor - you're right, you wouldn't use one of them in a drill.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
33 Posts
Discussion Starter #9
Clarification.......

Okay, first off, it WAS an extractor. NOT an LH drill bit. JUST an extractor, NO handle. I could go get a handle I suppose, and just bring along the extractor with me for a perfect fit to that.

To paraphrase, I was told to FIRST drill a smaller diameter hole into the center (or as close to center as I could get) of the bit-o-bolt, THEN put the extractor into the hole, reverse the drill, and "slowly" back out the bolt.

Theoretically, it sounded right, but the bolt appears to be "in" there rather well. I can take pics of what my situation is, along with the bits and extractor I am using, if further description is required, but I have a feeling that others have been here before and know what all that stuff looks like.........

Also, I have a mid 70's Benz that I had replaced a thermostat on, and ALL THREE bolts were identical. The two bolts on the Saab are apparently not, for there is maybe a quarter inch of non-threaded shaft on the head end of the sheared bolt. Was this bolt originally from the lower, and not the upper? You know how it is, you back out a bolt, assuming they are all the same, and toss it into the metal pie tin for the reinstallation later on, and just take it for granted they are all the same...

With respect to the loosely termed mechanic, I just called up a guy that claimed to be a saab guy, haven't given him a dime, it was a telephone number on the side of a garage that I pumped into the cellphone while bopping about town. He's not seen the car, I have paid him nothing, so in retrospect, he's basically given me nothing. You get what you paid for, and in this case, let the buyer beware, I suppose. He sounded like Tony Montana, so with a bit of a preconceived notion I kinda wanted to bounce this all off of you guys before I go doing something completely inept.

Snapping off a bolt, in my book, is only partially inept..... :cheesy:
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
33 Posts
Discussion Starter #10
Also, am I drilling the pilot hole COMPLETELY through the stuck shaft? It could be I am not entirely through the bolt, and that could be why the penetrating oil is doing nothing for me at all.....

It would seem that if you drilled completely through the bit-o-bolt, then the penetrating oil would be able to then work from the inside-out, so to speak.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
10,081 Posts
Mockles said:
It would seem that if you drilled completely through the bit-o-bolt, then the penetrating oil would be able to then work from the inside-out, so to speak.
Indeed, but the corrosion holding it in there is going to be from the outside in. If you drill all the way through, you're at much greater risk of damaging the casting.

I've always understood that a stud extractor like these :-

is used manually. The square head allows you to use a spanner on it for plenty of torque.

You say you're having difficulty getting the penetrating fluid to stay in the hole - try putting a bit of gaffer tape over the hole, with the "straw" from the can taped in there, then giving it a good squirt. Should hold it in.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
33 Posts
Discussion Starter #13
Yes - the extractor I have is just like what you have photographed there. I will try a spanner. I have used a pair of vicegrips, but have found the kids to have used them too often as some other god knows what, so I was 'jumping' on the square end.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
33 Posts
Discussion Starter #14
And by spanner you mean a crescent wrench, or adjustable, I would imagine, and NOT a ratchet, right?

Was also thinking on getting a small ratchet socket and maybe trying it that way. Something smaller than a 3/16ths, if they exist...
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,078 Posts
If you've got threads in the hole showing, and they're in good shape and at least as deep as the bolt is wide (diameter) you could try just using a shorter bolt - the thermostat housing isn't exactly a "high torque" component - if you can do so (use a shorter bolt that doesn't bottom in the hole when the gasket is nice and snug) you might be able to avoid a LOT of irritation -

Sometimes you can even make a stud (whack the head off an appropriate bolt, clean up the threads where you cut, soak with loctite and thread into the hole - let the loctite set up, place the thermostat housing on top, use a washer and nut to tighten the housing down on the stud) - that way you don't risk stripping any remaining threads out by bottoming out the bolt in the hole ....
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
33 Posts
Discussion Starter #17
I know where you're going with this, Steve, but the problem is it broke off flush with the block, and it's been basically immovable as far as status right now

Don't have a small enough spanner, but was thinking on possily a tiny tiny socket, perhaps something along those lines would be better.

Gooped it up with penetrating oil earlier, now just doing coffee for a while and letting it work.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
33 Posts
Discussion Starter #18
was even thinking on putting a slice in it and forming a screw head, but like I said, it's flush, I don't want to screw things up worse by doing something wrong, so I'm thinking the socket may be the best way to go.

Heat? How so??? Just put a torch on it, like at a pinhole flame size?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
10,081 Posts
Mockles said:
Gooped it up with penetrating oil earlier, now just doing coffee for a while and letting it work.
Heat, too. Get a blowtorch on it if you can. Just try to get any rubber/wiring out the way of the flame.

...and the replies overlap...

Heat? How so??? Just put a torch on it, like at a pinhole flame size?
Yep, the finer the flame the easier. DON'T get it red hot.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,078 Posts
Mockles said:
I know where you're going with this, Steve, but the problem is it broke off flush with the block, and it's been basically immovable as far as status right now

Don't have a small enough spanner, but was thinking on possily a tiny tiny socket, perhaps something along those lines would be better.

Gooped it up with penetrating oil earlier, now just doing coffee for a while and letting it work.
Sorry - I was under the impression that the bolt broke off down in the hole somewhere - not flush.
 
1 - 20 of 33 Posts
Top