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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Any idea what might be the cause (or is it somewhat normal) for the starter to crank over several times before ignition? Thought maybe the starter is going because sometimes it grinds after ignition.

I did read somewhere to try turning it on to the state where all the electronics come on and then wait several seconds and yes it often does take less cranks in this case to start.
 

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DI engines fire their plugs simultaneously during the first revolutions of a starting engine, to clear the plugs and get them ready to ignite the fuel which is then injected after this short delay. Older distributor engines inject fuel immediately and normally fire up on the turn of the key.

Whether the delay you are experiencing is normal or not is a bit subjective. If it always fires up after the delay I'd say all is well.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
ok, that makes sence. i just never imagined a car that takes several cranks to start up. as if it was cold or something.

but ya, it always fires up just find (except for the occasional grinding) so aside from starter replacement i guess there not much else that could be replaced here? (i already did the the sparkplugs, but no significant difference)
 

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Maybe the check valve above the fuel tank has failed. After the car has been sitting a few hours, pull the fuel pump fuse and try to start it. If it runs for a few seconds, the check valve is fine.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Ok, I'll give that a try, thanks!

It does start much faster with a warm engine ( afters it's been running half a hour or so.)
 

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Maybe the check valve above the fuel tank has failed. After the car has been sitting a few hours, pull the fuel pump fuse and try to start it. If it runs for a few seconds, the check valve is fine.
That's not a valid test.
The purpose of the check valve is to maintain pressure for about 20 minutes to prevent fuel boiling, thus vapor lock, after hot shut-down. The check valve has no function after that 20 minute period, and can only be tested with a fuel pressure guage (which can often be borrowed from a parts store). If your problem isn't specifically a hot-start problem, the check valve cannot be at fault.
 

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From http://www.thesaabsite.com/9000/Saab-check-valve-issues.htm

The typical problem with a fuel pump check valve failure is extended cranking time during start-up. What generally occurs here is that the check valve in the fuel line sticks open causing lack of fuel pressure. This usually occurs after the car has been sitting for a while or overnight. The fuel pressure leaks down causing the fuel pump to have to work very hard to push the fuel from the tank to the fuel rail. Similar to vapor lock but not quite. The solution to this is to replace the fuel pump check valve which can be difficult in itself. Be very cautious when attempting this repair because of the dealing with the fuel system FIRE HAZARD!!!!!!!

This is not something unique to the 9000. An emptied rail takes time to pressurize. This test will detect fuel rail leak down.
 

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The saabsite is just plain wrong.
The purpose of the check valve is as I stated. It does nothing at all after the first 20 minutes following shut-off. The instant the pump runs, the check valve does nothing at all. Watch it on a fuel pressure gauge, it takes milliseconds to pressurize the rail.
I've been to Volvo, Jaguar, Honda and 2 SAAB factory fuel injection schools and they all agree on that point. If you think the rail stays pressurized overnight, put a gauge on it and see for yourself.
 

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A full second between crank and fire is typical.
I agree.
My Jeep starts in less than one full revolution of the motor; I'm always astounded, it's so atypical.
I'd say as a rule-of-thumb, that it should start by the time you get to "three thousand", but they all have different personalities. Even on a lot full of brand-new cars, two identical models will exhibit different starting behavior.....All behavior now that I think of it. I guess they can't put 20,000 parts together and have them all work precisely the same in every aspect.
 

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I recently experienced the same issue (with out any grinding noises). Turned out to be battery related. A simple voltage test had me showing 12.5V across the terminals and the in-dash monitor showed 13.6V while running. So how could it be a battery issue??? The local auto parts shop tested the amps and it recorded something like 270. They charged it for about 45 minutes, tested it again and it was up to 480. Hooked it back up and the engine fired with no hesitation. After a couple days it was back to hesitating on start up and I installed a new battery. Problem solved and something learned.
Hope it can help someone else.
 

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Pre DI 9000 start instantly. DI equipped cars crank for a bit then fire right up. If it doesn't fire as soon as the fuel starts then maybe there's a fault but a few rpm delay is normal for DI 9000 engines.
 

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Any idea what might be the cause (or is it somewhat normal) for the starter to crank over several times before ignition? Thought maybe the starter is going because sometimes it grinds after ignition.

I did read somewhere to try turning it on to the state where all the electronics come on and then wait several seconds and yes it often does take less cranks in this case to start.

2 things:

A) how fresh is your battery and is it properly sized? They have less cranking power as they age.

B) while it's true that you might benefit from "letting the electronics come on", most cars cut the power to all of the non-essential electronics while cranking anyway so that as much of the battery power as possible can be directed to the energy thirsty starter.
 
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