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I've found the issue is the center bushings that cause the sag, which is why new springs arent correcting the ride height.. . obviously it isnt the issue lol

They are damn near impossible to replace, and I have the factory tool for this. Best bet is to just replace the arms.
Do you have pictures which show the problem on the old ones?
 

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Negative. But basically the rubber or bushing material or whatever it is molded in there has worn to the point it's no longer "staying" the cross stay arms. They'll still hold but the rubber softens to the point that the rear end drops an inch or two. I've never seen more than one make noise.. testament to the design I guess. Most other vehicles they'll squeak and squeal.

Economically it would be cheaper to use spacers. Those arms truly are a pita to remove those bushings without damaging something. Oxy torch and a hammer will bend something thus throwing camber off, an oxy torch and the bushing puller works but the tool heats up as soon as its contacted the arm and can soften the threads.. requiring another threaded rod or two in my case.
 

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I see that Lemforder makes aftermarket versions of the upper and lower arms, and of course there are the aftermarket adjustable arms that have been out for a while. If I have nothing better to do and $400 burning a hole in my pocket (ha!), it would be an interesting project to see if new arms with new bushings fixes my 2000 Aero's sagging rear end. It has new springs and the rest of the bushings are relatively new, but the inner one are all original with 225,000 miles on them. It's currently on 25mm spacers to get the back end up to about where it should be.
 

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maybe it would be worth to unbolt a single lower link and check for bushing, e.g. by sticking a bigger screwdriver into it and try to move it. If I find time I will give it a try, new bushings are already there so I can compare them. Up to now I was assuming that the inner bushings do not tend to wear that much and therefore did not changed them. Shouldn´t camber be highly affected if the wear that much that the wheel tilts?
 

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I was thinking of when I removed the rear trailing arms to replace the rose bushes and the large bushings that connects to the car body, I don't remember feeling any slop or mushiness in the lateral arms. I remember them still having quite a bit of spring in them. Now that it's warming up, I might have to look at them again.
 

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I was thinking of when I removed the rear trailing arms to replace the rose bushes and the large bushings that connects to the car body, I don't remember feeling any slop or mushiness in the lateral arms. I remember them still having quite a bit of spring in them. Now that it's warming up, I might have to look at them again.
same here, but will check when there is time.
 

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ok.
just to be sure: you are referring to part 4a?
Yep, its part 4a in the diagram. They're backwards on the drawing for some reason but yes.
The rose bushings have a way greater effect on the camber because they're pressed in the rear wheel knuckles. The way the 9-5's suspension geometry is set up the wheels can actually tilt camber a tiny degree while under rotating motion..I'm forgetting the technical word..
I think the camber actually is effected some, but not as much as say a BMW, because the knuckle bushings/ rose bushing only allows for so much lateral change thanks to those big solid steel sleeves.. that and BMW's use 2 arms that have eccentric bolts and forward links. SAAB needs a special tool with this weird chain thing on it to adjust camber.. I've never seen one in person.
First you get droop, then the rose bushings absorb the rest of the slop as far as they can. I suspect these bushings softening over time is what causes the rose bushings to wear as much as they do. However, given the age of these nowadays and knowing every moving part eventually wears out there's no way to say.
I was thinking of when I removed the rear trailing arms to replace the rose bushes and the large bushings that connects to the car body, I don't remember feeling any slop or mushiness in the lateral arms. I remember them still having quite a bit of spring in them. Now that it's warming up, I might have to look at them again.
They're probably still going to have some good spring when pushed far enough. I know my Arc's did. The way to test would be to put them in the position they'd bolt up at the knuckle and just feel how much tension/ springiness (if any) they have at that level. I can guarantee a new arm or bushing would need way more force to move in any position. The problem is there are 4 of them. I would guess just changing the two lower arms would have some kind of effect on the ride height since they're taking on more load.

Putting on new springs, shocks, and all other bushings (besides the 4a) and still having a below spec ride height definetly indicates to me at least there's some rubber somewhere that's not doing it's job.

It's much more feasible to just throw some spacers on amd call it a day though I admit. I wouldn't even say these things are serviceable honestly.
 

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I've found the issue is the center bushings that cause the sag, which is why new springs arent correcting the ride height.. . obviously it isnt the issue lol

They are damn near impossible to replace, and I have the factory tool for this. Best bet is to just replace the arms.
what was the problem with the factory tool? From description it looks straight forward: put in the halp pipe shaped part in between and then pull the old part out, press the new part in.
 

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Has anyone here done the adjustable rear cross-stay arms? Saab Ross has a good video tutorial on it here.
I have a pair. They are great, but I did not install them....yet...such a good idea, that GM installed into the L series Saturn, which was a comprehensive rip off from Saab of parts and engineering...
 

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what was the problem with the factory tool? From description it looks straight forward: put in the halp pipe shaped part in between and then pull the old part out, press the new part in.
They have a tendency to either strip or snap when used on bushings that have been through 10-15 years of usage. I'm sure it would have worked fine on a newer car haha.. not one where they're rusted in place.
 

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Has anyone here done the adjustable rear cross-stay arms?
I have a set on my 2000 Aero, they work great, fine tuning the alignment is super easy and they are a simple to install, cheap upgrade.

I installed them because I was happy with the ride height on my car (I could have put in spacers) but sagging was causing tire wear.

Once installed and aligned they do raise the ride height a little bit.
.
 

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They have a tendency to either strip or snap when used on bushings that have been through 10-15 years of usage. I'm sure it would have worked fine on a newer car haha.. not one where they're rusted in place.
Thanks, so it might help to soak them in PB blast a few days before exchange attempt. Or get some parts from the junkyard and prepare them in advance.
 

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272445

By now you should all be using anti seize. Regrettably Permatex and other similar anti seizes use naptha as the carrier solvent, and it evaporates leaving dissimilar metals that actually make things worse. I have already posted examples on 9-5 wheel bearing splines. Lloyds is manufactured near where I live, happily enough. I have used all sorts of different anti seize and this Lloyds stuff works the best, especially for brake caliper sliding pins and pad backing plates. You still need to service brake caliper sliders and pads each spring if you dd your car. But Lloyds really works. Just saying....
 

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Once installed and aligned they do raise the ride height a little bit.
That may confirm what 9-5r is saying, that old worn out inner bushings on those arms cause the back end to sag. I saw that eSaabparts is carrying the adjustable arms now, as well as RockAuto.
 

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I was going to install the adjustable arms on my 06 wagon but my car has the zenon headlights which rely on a load sensor mounted on right arm. Anyone find a work around that?
 

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Yep, that's the only solution to that. Make good measurements, fab one up or cut the old one off and weld it to the new one.. may need to stack some new sheet metal on a low setting with it so you don't burn through..
 
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