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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I have restored and repaired classic cars. I have done engine swaps, and body swaps on hot rods/rat rods. And I have also enjoyed the fun of modern European cars with efficient turbo engines.

Now, I am starting the journey of building a car from scratch and combining all of the above.

I am building a 1930 Chevy Coupe, and powering it with a 2.3L turbo motor from a 1995 Saab 9000. That is why I put this thread in the Saab 9000 section.

Transmission will be a T5 manual from a Chevy S-10, and I'll probably end up using a Ford 8.8" rear end. That hasn't been decided yet.

I will be building the frame from scratch. It will have a solid axle, mounted suicide style up front, and it will have a 4 link setup in the rear.

Here are some pics. As you can see, I am VERY early on in this build.

20170218_142844 by Chad Truss, on Flickr
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Here is the engine sitting with the car.
20170409_125042 by Chad Truss, on Flickr

And another shot of the engine.
20170409_121325 by Chad Truss, on Flickr


This engine had a big turbo on it and was dynoed at 430 something HP at the wheels when it was in my friends 9000. Now I will be putting it in this Chevy. It will have a stock turbo at first, just to prove the build, but then I will most likely upgrade it.
 

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Are you also planning on using the RWD Motorsport bellhousing adapter?

I ask because I keep thinking about picking one of those up just in case, and there is the RWD buggy thread here where it's also going to be used. Maybe we should see about a (small) group buy... might save some dollars, even if just on shipping.

(Those guys have a lot of cool stuff, BTW, including a bunch of pieces I need to put a Duratech in my Falcon)
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Yeah, I am planning on buying an adapter from RWD Motorsports. I would buy from someone in the US, but I can't find anyone that makes one.

I doubt they will do a group buy, they make the bellhousings to order. What I am getting at is buying a bunch of them all at once may not be saving the company a lot of time or effort. But I could ask them if they would take some money off if I line up a few people to buy them.

The other downside to the RWD Motorsport bellhousing is it uses a cable clutch setup and the clutch fork is discontinued. So you have to find a fork from an RS2000, which are expensive.

They sell a hydraulic throw out bearing setup, but I don't know anything about how those are setup. They sent me the instructions and it seems kinda sketchy, but I am not an expert.
 

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You wanna put them up somewhere? I would definitely prefer a hydraulic setup. Alternatively, it might be possible to have someone replicate the RS2000 part.

I don't really expect to save much if any money on the bellhousing, but several parts might help with a clutch change or shipping. I'd think it's certainly worth trying - nothing to lose by reaching out.
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
I got off work early on Friday, so I did some work on the coupe.

I removed the lumber that was holding the body up. Then I zip tied the doors to the cowl/A pillar assembly. Once the doors were in position, I dragged the rest of the body into place and tack welded the roof to the A-pillars.

Before.
20170218_142844 by Chad Truss, on Flickr

During
20170414_152545 by Chad Truss, on Flickr

20170414_152540 by Chad Truss, on Flickr

After
20170414_164046 by Chad Truss, on Flickr

20170414_164057 by Chad Truss, on Flickr


Then here are a couple pics of random stuff while I was out there.

This is the roof to A pillar connection. I'll need to make a front panel to go across the top of the windshield. On these Chevy's, that piece was lumber, so it is long gone.
20170409_125028 by Chad Truss, on Flickr

Potato Cam pic of whats left of the wood in one of the doors.
20170414_165615 by Chad Truss, on Flickr

This is what is left of the wood inside the drivers rear wheelwell.
20170414_165546 by Chad Truss, on Flickr


Next step is to buy 1x1 square tubing, and some angle iron. What I need to do is frame the body, make it a complete shell that can support itself. This stage will also give the doors something to hinge on and latch to. And I will start laying out where the floor goes.

This part of the build will take a while. I have to learn how to weld better first, and I have a couple house projects to get done as well.
 

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That HTOB setup looks pretty typical, eg



I suspect there is a good selection of parts out there, whether they be factory solutions, aftermarket solutions, or things adapted from other application. It's hard for me to visualize solutions here because I don't know what their bellhousing adapter looks like, but their offering is at least a fallback.

The RS2000 fork doesn't look too special



not too unlike the 2.3l+T5 foxbody fork:



so maybe something we have here is a fair substitute. The UK did not get a lot of T5-equipped cars, whereas we are inundated with Camaros, Mustangs, and pickups that did. They may simply not be aware (or interested in) such alternatives.
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
I placed the parts order today. They were not interested in any sort of group buy as someone asked above.

I found a Ford RS2000 clutch fork for a reasonable price on ebay, so I bought that.

Then I went to RWD Motorsports and placed the order for the bellhousing.

And to answer your other question, they sell what they call a Spigot bearing that fits the Saab crankshaft. I also bought the release bearing from them.

This week I am picking up a T5 transmission from a 1991 Chevy S-10. And this weekend I am picking up a Ford 8.8" rear axle. The rear axle is a posi unit from an Explorer.
 

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Just a note, in case you were unaware: Not all T5s are the same. Aside from the obvious World Class vs. Non-World Class there are also differences in input shaft diameter, spline count, and tailshaft/shifter housing lengths. Be sure you get the right setup for your goals. I think the S10 was always NWC & a granny gear first. It may not be a good match for a B234.... a stock B234 is pushing a NWC T5's torque rating!
 

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Discussion Starter · #15 ·
Just a note, in case you were unaware: Not all T5s are the same. Aside from the obvious World Class vs. Non-World Class there are also differences in input shaft diameter, spline count, and tailshaft/shifter housing lengths. Be sure you get the right setup for your goals. I think the S10 was always NWC & a granny gear first. It may not be a good match for a B234.... a stock B234 is pushing a NWC T5's torque rating!
I chose the T5 from an S-10 because of the input shaft being the right size. I was considering the Mustang T5, but the input shaft is the wrong size.
 

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FWIW, the Mustang had two input shaft diameters - .668 for V8 cars and . 59 for four cylinders. The turbo cars (SVO and Turbocoupe) had WC T5s with the smaller input shafts. I think you could also find these on the early 4th gen Camarobirds but I'm not an expert by far. ;)
 

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They're called transmaro birds, and only the third gen cars had the t5 transmission. The fourth gens had the t56. Unless the v6 cars had a t5. I only ever paid attention to the v8 cars. It'd be awesome if you could use their bellhousing to adapt to a t56 transmission...
 

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Discussion Starter · #19 ·
A T56 would be fun, but a T5 is really all I need. I don't need that 6th gear, nor do I really need overdrive because this car is not meant to be super fast.

I was even considering a Muncie 4 speed, just to get some old skool flare, but I figured I could do the T5 5 speed to make it a little more practical.
 
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