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I would like to get some general information on high performance racing cams for my 96 900 SE Turbo 2.0 B024L. What are the pros and cons up upgrading my stock cams? I am looking for high faster revs and more torque output in the low-end. What is the average cost of upgraded cams, are they something I can just take off the head and drop them in and if not what is the average cost of labour for having them put in? Will I have to replace anything else along with them? And I do have to have the ECU remapped correct?

I read the cons of putting in upgraded cams are...

Cons: extra lag at low revs, and never found a road long enough for top end........ also as the car seemed to struggle a bit at low revs I am sure it used more fuel around town etc." -Chris 9-5
 

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You could replace the cams by just pulling the valve cover off. But people only do that to heavily modified saabs with big turbos.
Im pretty sure you would need the ecu remapped to run right.

There are better mods to do first that are more bang for the buck. But first thing is a good tune up and making sure the engine is running perfect.
 

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I am looking for high faster revs and more torque output in the low-end.[/I]
High duration cams will not provide this. Cams are something you add when you have a 19T if not larger turbo. But that 19T or GT30 or HX35 etc. will spool slower than the stock turbo. Putting you farther from your goal. The cams allow the engine to more efficiently pump 4000rpm and above.

When asking for advice, it would be very helpful if you provide what modifications you currently have. With that info we can move forward
 

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I would like to get some general information on high performance racing cams for my 96 900 SE Turbo 2.0 B024L. What are the pros and cons up upgrading my stock cams? I am looking for high faster revs and more torque output in the low-end. What is the average cost of upgraded cams, are they something I can just take off the head and drop them in and if not what is the average cost of labour for having them put in? Will I have to replace anything else along with them? And I do have to have the ECU remapped correct?

I read the cons of putting in upgraded cams are...

Cons: extra lag at low revs, and never found a road long enough for top end........ also as the car seemed to struggle a bit at low revs I am sure it used more fuel around town etc." -Chris 9-5

If you want quicker revs, get the flywheel's weight reduced or get a lightened flywheel (GS has one for sale). A slight reduction in weight can pay dividends in quicker revs, which help the turbo get up into boost quicker, but too light can be harder to drive in stop/go traffic for some.

As far as the cams go, what are you trying to do? Cams have a certain usable rpm range, like off idle to 6000 would typically be a good street cam (all things considered) as it covers the off idle range with a decent 6000 at the top. Now, that same cam for example might make decent low end, strong midrange, and OK top end. Now, let's say cam number 2's range is 1500 rpm to 7500 rpm. It has abysmal low range power, decent midrange, and strong top end. Cam number 1 would be a better street and all-around cam, whereas cam number 2 would be a better race cam as it focuses on top-end power. Cam number 2 would also need upgraded valve springs, possibly solid lifters, higher rpm capable harmonic balancer, rpm limit raised in ecm, etc. Average usable hp might be higher with cam no.1, whereas cam no.2 would have a higher peak number. In a street car, I'd go with no.1. In a track car with nitrous early on, I'd take cam no.2, though cam no.1 with nitrous could probably be just as quick.

Expect to pay 500-800 for decent, custom ground cams since you need 2 separate cams. Try to avoid an all size fits all cam from aftermarket as you'll be leaving some power or drivabilty on the table unless it's designed exactly for the car and everything in your car. A true custom ground cam is developed based on your vehicle weight, engine compression, lobe separation, turbo, manual trans, final gear ratio, power band you want, etc. Summit Racing sells reputable cams, and some (if not most) of their suppliers can do custom grinds (be warned, some companies have out sourced so you might get some 3rd world Hindu guy who knows nothing and depends on a computer program, or you might get hillbilly Henry in Tenn. who has Chevy small blocks for a coffee table; pick Henry obviously) if you are set on it. Just have the info ready (like what's mentioned above) and they can talk you through the process, and address any concerns while creating a cam that fits your needs.

Some guys run over-sized exhaust housings and exhaust wheels on physically larger turbos, that were designed for use in bigger engines. Since their engine is too small and can't pump enough through the exhaust housing at low speed, they might try and make up for this shortcoming in the top end by raising the rpm limit (more spent gases flowing through the housing). Cam number 2 might be better suited to their car and driving style as the turbo needs the high rpms of the smaller engine to really work as intended. The trade off is typically being the car needs to be up and moving already. That was just an example, so please keep hate mail in check guys.

One other thing often overlooked in high mileage cars, is the factory cams ARE a wearable item. So you might have a 224/224 cam when new, but 200k miles later it'll likely be less than new, with varying duration from individual wear between the lobes. So a used, high mileage cam, if left unchecked and not miked for consistency or advertised numbers, can actually hurt some performance. I rode in a 220k Toyota Tacoma years ago that *ran* OK, but the cam lobes were so worn it had a really flat response that wasn't there in a lower mileage engine and it had no power when the pedal was mashed, but had it been turbo'd it might be harder to detect the power loss.
 
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