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Discussion Starter #1
Having just been gifted a digital camera, and having just replace my inner CV boot and steering rack boot, I thought I might take a picture or two and document the process a bit.

First off you will need to break the lug nuts free. Don't remove them, just break them free. Now you will jack the car up and position your jack stand in a suitable secure location. Go ahead and remove the lug nuts now and remove the wheel. This is what you will see at this point, the red circles indicate our problem areas.



Next we need to support the upper A-frame to take the downward force from the spring pressure off the spindle assembly that we are going to be removing next. Saab had a special tool for this, if you have this special tool, then you are special. If you are not special, then like me you will have to use an alternate tool. My "Tool" is a pair of large machine nuts, bought at the hardware store for something like $0.40-$0.50 cents a peice. To insert these in place you will need to place the jack under the A-frame, on the ball joint would work, and jack up the A-frames until you have enough room to insert your tool like such. See picture below.



Viewed from a little further back.



Once these are positioned slowly lower the jack and let the A-frame lower down onto the "tool".

Now its time to get busy. First to come off is the caliper. Remove E-brake cable if you have one. Remove the two bolts highlighted below.



If you have the old style brakes like mine, there are two notches in the brake disc, line one of these up with the caliper then slide the caliper off.

Now its time for the fun part. Removing the tie rod end, and the upper and lower ball joint bolts.

To remove the tie rod end, remove the nut, then use a pry bar to apply upward pressure and strike where it shows in the picture below, do not strike the tie rod end itself.




Thats done, if you look closely you can see where I hit it with the hammer, it came free on the first strike.








 

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Discussion Starter #2
Continuing on, removing the two upper ball joint nuts.



Next remove the two lower ball joint bolts.




Reach in and unclip the inner CV joint clamp, a screwdriver might help with this, or if its already tearing pretty well, you can do as I did and simply let it tear as I did and just remove the axle and spindle assembly.

If you chose not to unclip it then you simply now slide the ball joints out and remove the whole axle/spindle assembly.

Watch the end, do not let the bearings come off or needle bearings will go everywhere.

As soon as its out I like to do this.



Use nitrile gloves not latex as in the picture, all I had was latex at the moment but latex will not last very long, grease etc makes the latex fall apart. But the glove will stretch over the end and hold the bearings on and keep dirt out.

Put the assembly on the bench and break out your snap ring pliers. This is what you will see.



There is a snap ring on the end here.



Remove it.

 

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Discussion Starter #4
After the ring is removed I like to set the assembly on the ground, grasp the end to hold all the bearing on, place the appropriate sized socket on the end to act as a driver, and gently tap the axle out with a rubber mallet. DON'T HIT THE BEARINGS!

Set it all back on the bench. It should look like this.



Here what comes in the replacement inner CV boot kit.



Now you can slide what is left of the old boot off, clean the surface up a bit, and slide the new one on. Put the new clamp on first, its small, its easier to put it on first. There is an indentation in the axle, you can see it in the picture below, this is where you are going to clamp the end of the boot at. As you slide the boot on you should be able to tell when its in the right place.



Here it is in place and ready to have the clamp crimped.



Crimp the clamp. There is a special tool for this too, I used needle nose pliers. Meh.



Now put it back the tripod bearing end back on, I once again like to set the assembly on the ground, and gently tap it back in place with a rubber mallet or ball peen hammer. Gently, it should go back on fairly easily. As said before, DON'T HIT THE BEARINGS THEMSELVES!!!

Install the replacement snap ring that came in the kit. The reason for this is they assume the old one might be fatigued. Put the new grease in the boot, work it into the bearings. Pack it in like you would any bearing, work it in well, turn the bearings as you pack it in to make sure you get fresh grease in the bearings.

 

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Discussion Starter #5 (Edited)
Now we can set this aside for a bit and work on the steering rack boot.

Remove the tie rod end from the inner tie rod. Carefully count how many revolutions it takes to remove it, you will need to carefully tighten it on this many revolutions to avoid throwing your toe off.

End and boot removed.



This is what it will look like with your boot off. Pay attention to the little tube at the top, there is a matching hole in the new boot, you will need to line them up in order for the boot to fit on properly.



Install new boot, there is a clamp on either end. Reinstall tie rod end.



That is done, now its time to reinstall the axle/spindle assembly.

Basically it is the reverse of what you just did to take it off. The only thing to really be carefull of is that you get the tripod bearing back into the transmission cuff without letting any of the bearings fall off.

I usually slide the lower ball joint into place, then turning the axle as needed, slide the tripod bearing into place, while simulaneously lining up and sliding in the upper ball joint. Its not as hard as it sounds.

Install and tighten the upper and lower ball joint bolts and nuts, use locktight!! Install tie rod end into the spindle, if you have trouble getting the nut tight, use a rubber mallet to tap the tie rod into the spindle for a tighter fit, or just use an air gun. Locktight this nut on as well!!

Install the brake caliper. As noted before, you will need to line up one of the notches in the brake disk with the caliper before you can slide it on. Reinstall the two bolts holding it on, use Locktight!!!

Pretend this picture says "Install these bolts" and "bend this tab back".



New CV joint in place. You will need to install the inner clamp. It's a pain but doable.



You should be back to this point.



Put the jack back under the A-frame, jack it up enough to remove the spacers from the A-frame, use something other than your fingers please.

Double check everything.

Install wheel. Tighten lug nuts. Remove jack stands and lower car. Torque lug nuts.

Put on center cap.

You're done.

I have probably forgotten a step or two, this isn't professional advice, you can't blame me for forgetting to do something on my own car, use your head please, don't do anything you don't think or feel is right or correct, don't do anything dangerous, don't do anything stupid, don't do anything wrong, even if I told you wrong, do it right.
 

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Discussion Starter #6 (Edited)
SpecialTool said:
Caution: We do not recommend jacking your car on turf.:lol:
But its so much easier on the knees. :eek:

As special tool said, Don't jack your car on the the turf, turf damage may result. Turf damage caused by falling car may cause damage to you. It's a cruel cycle. :roll:

But on the bright side, your knees will be fine. :D
 

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I apologise but I am going to have a moan. :(

Why is it necessary to post such large file size images?

I do not have broadband - in fact I cannot get broadband due to the incompetence of British Telecom (a UK public monopoly company).

On dial up network the images are too large - I see part of some of your pics.

Sorry to be grumpy. Your post looked like a good one - shame I cannot see your pics. :cheesy:
 

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RickyS said:
I apologise but I am going to have a moan. :(

Why is it necessary to post such large file size images?

I do not have broadband - in fact I cannot get broadband due to the incompetence of British Telecom (a UK public monopoly company).

On dial up network the images are too large - I see part of some of your pics.

Sorry to be grumpy. Your post looked like a good one - shame I cannot see your pics. :cheesy:
Turn off images in your browser. When i used to only have dial-up i used opera which used to have a button which turned off all the images until you clicked on them.
Sorry but the majority of the world have broadband now! I'm on slow home broadband and i just leave picture heavy threads to sit there for a while to load - but they are a lot better with loads of pics than just loads of words.

Nice thread Matt. for the 'special upper arm retaining tool'. scrap blocks of wood work as well as shiney new nuts!
 

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I use Opera and use the no images button sometimes.

Unfortunately I cannot get broadband because BT failed to put in adequate capacity when a new estate was built. Until they decide to invest in extra capacity I am stuck on dial up. :evil:

Matt has gone to considerable time and trouble taking (and posting) pictures of what he has done. I applaud him for that.

The grumble I was trying to make is that there is no great benefit on posting images of such large file size. A 50kb image at 640x480 is all that is necessary. A 300kb image takes 6 times as long to download, and the quality of the picture is little better when viewed online on a computer screen.

The image below is less than 50kb.
http://www.saabcentral.com/forums/attachment.php?attachmentid=8192

One of Matt's pics was 445Kb. On dial up the average download speed is about 4 kb/sec. One pic that size takes 2 mins to download - 20 takes 40 mins.

End of grumble. :cheesy:
 

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Butting in, when I post images to a forum I tend to resize them to 400x300. The reason for the magic number is a reminder of its normal aspect ratio. Also, it is usually big enough but not awfully big.

That said, because of the text in the pictures themselves I think the images in this thread were just the right size. I can make a pdf out of it if you want.
 

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After removing the snap ring at the end of the shaft, occationally I've found it impossible to pull the tripod bearing off the shaft, almost as if the tripod was press fitted onto the shaft splines. On these occasions, I've had to remove the other end of the shaft from the outer CV joint and slide the new rubber boot in. The problem seems more pronounced on later driveshafts from > '91. Anyone else experienced this ?
 

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supremedalek when I post images to a forum I tend to resize them to 400x300. [/QUOTE said:
Resizing images is a time consuming task and not necessary if you set your camera to the lowest image quality before you take any pics.

I set my camera to lowest image quality and to 640x480 size. The images come out usually between 40-60kb file size. If I set camera to 800x600 the images come out about 100 -150kb file size.

It is not necessary to set a camera at high image quality if you are only going to view the images on computer screen. The difference in quality of the image when viewed on a computer screen is mininmal.

If you intend to print the pics then thats a different matter.
 

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SpecialTool said:
Caution: We do not recommend jacking your car on turf.:lol:
No that's not a good idea. I don't have a lot of choice since I don't have a concrete slab or garage, but I have a bunch of wooden blocks that I always use when I need to work under a car after jacking to take the weight, and leave the jack in place as an additional backup.

Craig.
 

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RickyS said:
Resizing images is a time consuming task and not necessary if you set your camera to the lowest image quality before you take any pics.

[...]

It is not necessary to set a camera at high image quality if you are only going to view the images on computer screen. The difference in quality of the image when viewed on a computer screen is mininmal.
When I was in kitty school, we were always told to take pictures at the highest resolution/quality you can and then scale down a copy for your application. Downgrading an image to fit an application is always easier than the other way around.

c900 said:
No that's not a good idea. I don't have a lot of choice since I don't have a concrete slab or garage, but I have a bunch of wooden blocks that I always use when I need to work under a car after jacking to take the weight, and leave the jack in place as an additional backup.
What are the chances of you getting some plywood sheets (3/4" or thicker to be safe? I've used 1/2" under my Volvo and they held well) under the jacks/jackstands? You could even go fancy and screw one to the smaller side of a 4x4 piece of wood and have your own nature-friendly jackstand. :D
 

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Its funny how bentley suggests "marking the position of the track rod end"
whereas all you have to do is count the turns.
Your picture suggests that you use the pry bar between the track rod and the anti roll bar. I have no front anti roll bar, so maybe I could use the pry bar between the track rod and the a -arm.?
 

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That's a lot of unnecessary work to take out an axle.
Remove the two upper ball joint bolts and axle nut, then the clamp on the driver boot. Leave the lower ball joint alone, leave the brake caliper alone, leave the tie-rod alone.
20 minutes with a lift and air tools.
 

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nice job!

hey,

So that is exacetely what I need done... but for that job I will be paying 300 bucks! grrr.
But I am learning slowly how to do things my self.. you start with the easy stuff..

How long does this job take a normal person?

Thanks!
Mati
 
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