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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Ok, so I know there is an excellent thread on this forum for replacing the fuel pump here:

http://www.saabcentral.com/forums/showthread.php?t=119759&highlight=fuel+pump

But, it’s old and getting pretty long (7 pages now). Before I did this job I read through it completely at least two times, and had to do a lot of synthesizing of this person’s and that persons opinions--deeply buried on one of the pages was a BIG IDEA about how to unclip the fuel line retainers that really works, but it’s a one-liner and easy to miss. Also, the thread assumes that you are going to disassemble the pump housing and replace just the pump itself. After a lot of research on this and other forums, and also with the professionals, I decided to replace the entire housing as a unit.


Anyway, after synthesizing all of the information I could gather, I did the job and took plenty of pictures. I have put together a photo journal “how to” that may be more useful from a visual perspective. I’m starting a new thread with this just because it is a lot of pictures and might be easier to follow as a separate thread. If the mod’s think this is duplicative they can just go ahead and delete it.

I have 59 photos total, and can only post them in 9 photo increments, so there 7 total posts--this may take me a bit, so please be patient and let me get all 7 posts done in a row.


So, here goes:



















 

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Very nice post. It looks like you have a little more room in the back seat with the 4-door car. With my 2-door hatch back, I needed to remove the two pins and remove the passenger seat bottom for more room.

I don't know why people make such a big deal about cutting an access hole. Future repairs can be done just about anywhere and fairly quickly with a minimum amount of tools... Ron
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
Did you find the wires were far enough out of the way that you didn't risk cutting or nicking them with the chisel bit? That's the only part about doing this that worries me....
The wires are just loosely laid in the space between the floor and the pump housing cover. When you disconnect them you can easily pull them out of the way for cutting. That is why I used the metal cutting bit as well--it is very precise and just grabs the steel--the cutting tooth only protrudes about an 1/8 inch down and so very little below the floor you are cutting. Here is a close up of the bit.


If you are careful you will not cut the wires.
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
I don't know why people make such a big deal about cutting an access hole. Future repairs can be done just about anywhere and fairly quickly with a minimum amount of tools... Ron
Indeed. I thought about dropping the tank, but determined that cutting the hole was a better way to proceed--with the added advantage that there would be an access plate for future work (hopefully not mine)...











Plus, if you drop the tank you have to deal with the fuel lines blind, which was difficult enough in full view with the retaining clip mechanism undone.
 

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I found it easier/more advantageous to only cut part way around for the hole in the car, that way you can fold the metal back and then back down (kinda like you suggested with the carpet). A little glass fiber and resin and it creates as strong as new cover. I did leave my unsealed for about a week to make sure there were no problems. Granted it makes replacing the pump a 2nd time more difficult, but with the pumps lasting 125K-150K I don't see that really being necessary. Also with the resin still being tacky you can seal the carpet back down.
http://img807.imageshack.us/i/img20110410124359.jpg/
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
I found it easier/more advantageous to only cut part way around for the hole in the car, that way you can fold the metal back and then back down (kinda like you suggested with the carpet). A little glass fiber and resin and it creates as strong as new cover. I did leave my unsealed for about a week to make sure there were no problems. Granted it makes replacing the pump a 2nd time more difficult, but with the pumps lasting 125K-150K I don't see that really being necessary. Also with the resin still being tacky you can seal the carpet back down.
I read about and considered this approach, but I wanted the access hole to be reusable for the inevitable future fuel pump replacement (mine went at 86K). I also considered fabricating a new access panel that would screw on, or welding tabs to the cut-out plug and screwing it on. As it turns out, the duct tape provided a secure fit and it certainly sealed air tight. If I ever get free time I might still fabricate an access panel with a flared edge to fit right in and screw down, but it is really unnecessary as the tape did the job better than expected.
 

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I cut a sheet metal cover and used sheet metal screws to secure the cover. I rounded off the sharp ends of the screws so they would not puncture the plastic tank during a rear end collision... Ron
 

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Discussion Starter · #15 ·
I rounded off the sharp ends of the screws so they would not puncture the plastic tank during a rear end collision... Ron
That is a very good idea and a good point. I will probably just stick with the duct tape. Since there was already an access hole there with just a pop-in plastic plug, the engineers were obviously not concerned with providing a secure fire wall between floor and tank in case of collision, but they were assuming nothing protruding on top of the tank to cause a puncture. For a hit to deform the floor under the rear seat, and thereby have already transferred through the rear or side crush zones, would have to be a very high speed impact, or a very heavy blow (say from a train or a fully loaded semi), or a very bad side hit. I once had a chance to inspect an old (79-93) 900 that had been hit in the side by a semi at high speed, and that uni-body held up remarkably well--the roof had buckled and the B pillar was way deformed, but the doors held at the SIPS points and the floor was only crushed in a few inches--the seat was deformed, but the passenger was not seriously injured (at least no bone breakage or bleading)--the car was bent into a U though.
 

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Another favorite, and there are numerous ones on the FP.
The best is where a man bought the entire tank for $10 and just swapped units.
The threads should be oiled or greased at each service and all rust should be treated....maybe one out of ten do this.
The duct tape(industrial) is this better than HD or Lowes or Ace tape ?
It seems as if the tape adhesive is poor quality, it does not last very long.
And this presentation, IMO, is the best yet, really quite an achievement.
I will have to do my pump one of these fine days.
And both the Saab;ol; and the Honda;ol; ( nearly 350K miles for both ) ....cars are only human, do not last forever.
 
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The shiny, metallic (real) duct tape would be better than this fabric stuff. The fabric tape is great for many things, but it doesn't age well. The metal stuff sticks tenaciously, is very strong, and is not bothered by anything - heat, age, water - anything!!
 

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Discussion Starter · #18 ·
Another favorite, and there are numerous ones on the FP.
The best is where a man bought the entire tank for $10 and just swapped units.
The threads should be oiled or greased at each service and all rust should be treated....maybe one out of ten do this.
The duct tape(industrial) is this better than HD or Lowes or Ace tape ?
It seems as if the tape adhesive is poor quality, it does not last very long.
And this presentation, IMO, is the best yet, really quite an achievement.
I will have to do my pump one of these fine days.
And both the Saab;ol; and the Honda;ol; ( nearly 350K miles for both ) ....cars are only human, do not last forever.
Yes, the industrial duct tape is a much higher quality--the glue is very long lasting and very adhesive. The stuff they sell at Lowes/Home Depot won't even hold on duct work anymore. It can be gotten through industrial suppliers like Granger or on-line.

I have a good friend who owns a large body shop, and so I use his materials/supplies, which is where I got it--I have enjoyed this privilege for so long now (20 years anyway) that I have forgotten what it is like not to have a lift (frame-rack, unlimited air, paint booth, plasma cutter, mig/tig welder, torches, etc.) is like. If my friend ever retires, I will have to seriously rethink my car owning strategy, or spend serious $ on my own facility.

If you want to really drool, right next door to my friend's body shop I have another good friend who owns a European import salvage yard with rows and rows of Saab's and Volvo's, I have the run of that establishment as well--when I was young, I used to buy late model wrecked Saab/Volvo/Mercedes from my salvage friend and rebuild them at my body shop friend's shop--2-3 a year--the salvage pool was just down the street, so we could go and inspect the piece before bidding. Nice gig, but it cost me a marriage since I never went home--true story. Now I have to be satisfied with maintaining my own cars and making sure my 2nd wife doesn't think I'm gone too long--the sacrifices we make--but a happy marriage is better than living in auto heaven (at least this marriage anyway)--it was nice though.
 

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Excellent write-up. I wish I had access to this last summer when I did mine. I used the traditional method by dropping the tank, which was a huge ordeal. This could have saved so much time.
 

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I never knew the access panel under the seat didn't provide access to the pump. At first I was horrified to see the car cut into, but everyone seems to be in agreement that this is the preferred method over dropping the tank.

It's been something on the back of my mind, because I'm 90k miles into my fuel pump. I changed the fuel filter, and I never let it dip below 1/4 tank to avoid this repair as long as possible.
 
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