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Discussion Starter #1
How to correctly repair broken airflow/carlsson bumper - I mean what technology? Somebody crashed lightly in the corner of rear bumper and made a tear at the horisontal upper part of bumper ...
I believe it`s poliuretane ... do I tray to "weld" with soldering iron or just leave the original material untouched and just glue some material behind the tear ???
Is it OK to drive around with teared bumper untill I fix it ... or it may go further?

p.s. waht approximate weight of 16v n/a motor/gearbox assembly - ~ 200 kg or so?

Thank`s in advance!
 

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Yeah the Airflow kit's made from polyurethane, which can be welded but I don't know how it's done. Could be something best left to an expert.

I have an Airflow kit in the attic and the front bumper's cracked. Attempts by previous owners to repair it with fibreglass have been unsuccessful. I was wondering if a metal plate epoxied on the back of the bumper would add enough strength. The outward-facing crack could then be filled and sanded.

I'd investigate plastic welding first though. It can be done, just a case of finding someone who knows how!

Engine/box weight:
http://www.saabcentral.com/forums/showthread.php?t=18969

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i hear this now after i threw away my carlsson bumper!! :(
 

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You can also get a glue/solvent called Plastic Weld which dissolves PVC and a few other plastics. When i was in uni we used it to make models. You get a sheet of PVC or similar plastic to the bumper, chop it up into small pieces then dissolve it in the Plastic Weld ( or as a technician gave us Chloroform :eek: ). Once you have a gluppy plastic soup you can use it to repair crack and even build new surfaces. It dissolves the surrounding plastic and basically welds it together, the solvent evaporates and your left with hard plastic which can then be sanded and painted.
 

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I actually used something comparable in Alaska this summer. I worked up there for 2 months and most of the time I was using the plastic welder. It was a bit bigger and had a roll feed. For filling you need to work it in really slowly letting the platic build up. then super fast you need to press it down with a puddy knife. It cools pretty quick. and when it does you cant shape it. then sand. You could take a bumber that was broken in half and fix it so it was strong again.
 

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Matthew said:
What are stock Aero/SPG post-facelift bumpers made from?

Polyurethane.

the Airflow bumpers are made from something else.
 

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I repaired my airflow bumper very well with plastic weld glue from B&Q. i was amazed at the result. no need for fibreglass patchs on the back, could even sand the joint smooth. the bond is very strong.

Its a 2 part glue, about £5 for a reasonable sized tube, works a treat!
 

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According to the Airflow instructions, these are made of "PUR-RIM" which, I believe, indicates it is made of Polyurethane using the Reaction Injection Molding process. So I would say it's polyurethane, but how to fix it, I don't know....
 

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Discussion Starter #11
my carosserie repair shop "reapired" ir - they just filled and painted the crack that was open ...

after looking from beneath the car i saw that it was repaired befor with fiberglass and those guys at shop didn`t remofe old patch to put it back properly. Old fiberglass patch was disattached itself partly from bumber.

So, I took it off, scraped old fiberglass repair and applied a new. That`s how the story ended.
 
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