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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Bents has nothing on this, nor can I find anything in searches. Anyone removed one before?

Do I need to pull the steering wheel or can it be done in situ?

Thanks much!
 

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The dust is toxic after deployment (sodium azide), so wear your respirator and clean with a HEPA filter vacuum cleaner. Normally any SRS repairs are supposed to done by trained people with the right diagnostic equipment.
After deployment SAAB wants you to replace the steering wheel, clockspring, airbag itself and the SRS ECU. Usually just a clockspring and airbag will do it.
 

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The airbag is held on with two screws from the back of the wheel, you need to remove this before taking the wheel off.

Sodium azide is a component of the propellant, after deployment you shouldn't have any more than trace amounts of this around, it should turn to nitrogen and gas out and the sodium is supposed to be neutered into a salt (kind of like the stuff in leaded gas to stop lead metal from seizing the engine or clogging the muffler - turned it into a gaseous salt)
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
The airbag is held on with two screws from the back of the wheel, you need to remove this before taking the wheel off.
Are they screws? I thought they were spring-wires holding in notches in the bag pins. Phillips heads or Torx?
 

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Are they screws? I thought they were spring-wires holding in notches in the bag pins. Phillips heads or Torx?
I think they are Torx (YMMV with year-year changes), they are like screws but there is a spring around them. Keep a hand to stop the spring from popping the screw out. They go right into the side of the airbag housing. Anyway those are the only things holding the bag in place (well and the wire, but there is plenty slack).
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
I think they are Torx (YMMV with year-year changes), they are like screws but there is a spring around them. Keep a hand to stop the spring from popping the screw out. They go right into the side of the airbag housing. Anyway those are the only things holding the bag in place (well and the wire, but there is plenty slack).
Hmm...eenteresteeng...I'm going to have to check that out. That would make life so much easier.
 

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Two Torx screws, one behind each side pointing to rear of car. Disconnect battery first. Normally, with a non-blown airbag I disconnect the battery, wait 20 minutes, remove the 2 screws, and carefully remove the battery. If you apply battery to car with airbag removed, normally you will set a SRS light, but yours was already set, and now the bag is done also, so probably not much difference, except when you install a new one. I don't know anything about a "spring around them"? SRS light has to be reset with ?Tech II? A dealer or Indy with set can do it.

The clockspring MUST be in the center of its travel (almost 2 turns each way, total of 3.67 turns altogether) with the steering wheel about straight ahead when you install one. Otherwise you'll ruin it on your first left or right turn. Vern
 

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The screws are Security Torx with a post in the center. That's to discourage untrained repairers.
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
Jim Mesthene said:
The screws are Security Torx with a post in the center.
You can buy a set of security torx with the hole in the center from Harbor Freight for a few dollars.
Ahh...that makes sense. Good thing I have a set!
 

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Sodium azide is a component of the propellant, after deployment you shouldn't have any more than trace amounts of this around, it should turn to nitrogen and gas out and the sodium is supposed to be neutered into a salt (kind of like the stuff in leaded gas to stop lead metal from seizing the engine or clogging the muffler - turned it into a gaseous salt)
At SAAB SRS School, they said respirator, gloves, and a HEPA vacuum cleaner.
The airbags are brought to you by Morton-Thiokol, the same people who made the Space Shuttle Challenger's booster rockets.
 

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The screws are Security Torx with a post in the center. That's to discourage untrained repairers.
Mine aren't (at least on a '91, '94, '99)

You should be able to tell pretty easily by turning the wheel a certain way and then looking at it from the windshield IIRC
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
Mine aren't (at least on a '91, '94, '99)

You should be able to tell pretty easily by turning the wheel a certain way and then looking at it from the windshield IIRC
No matta...my torx wrenches are all security anyhoo. :cool:
 

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I would personally not take the risk re the sodium azide, it's inhibits the electron transport chain in your cells, meaning you get no ATP, your cells die and so do you. Not ideal...

Who said biochemistry at uni can't be applied to daily life :p
 

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I would personally not take the risk re the sodium azide, it's inhibits the electron transport chain in your cells, meaning you get no ATP, your cells die and so do you. Not ideal...

Who said biochemistry at uni can't be applied to daily life :p
It is better when applied to barley and hops ;ol;
 

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Discussion Starter · #16 ·
It is better when applied to barley and hops ;ol;
In about 5 minutes, I'll be applying barley and hops to the Rangers/Devils game.

Whoops...off topic... ;)
 

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I would personally not take the risk re the sodium azide, it's inhibits the electron transport chain in your cells, meaning you get no ATP, your cells die and so do you. Not ideal...

Who said biochemistry at uni can't be applied to daily life :p
Sodium azide is what's present before the airbag deploys--it should all be consumed/transformed (not proper chemistry speak) in the process of inflating the bag. Most of the powder seen in your car after deployment is (talc) what's packed around the bag to make sure it doesn't stick to itself and not deploy after being crammed inside your steering wheel for a decade or more... Any powder is a lung/eye irritant...

No warnings at the junkyards to avoid deployed airbags (and the US is pretty good about mandating warnings...)

Not saying not to do your own research or apply caution...
 

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We got standard industrial training that resulted, oddly enough, in our having authority to ship explosives interstate.
All the Sodium Azide should be consumed; apparently it isn't. The levels apparently are low, that's why a respirator and HEPA vacuum cleaner are enough.
We got lots of training for firefighting, first aid, hazardous material handling etc. The usual industrial barrage. If you were a foreman you got all the training and were expected to train others. Some of the threats they outlined are obviously exaggerated, some are underrated. Some threats I can't evaluate the danger of. In those cases, Sodium Azide being one, I err on the side of caution.
 

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I would personally not take the risk re the sodium azide, it's inhibits the electron transport chain in your cells, meaning you get no ATP, your cells die and so do you. Not ideal...

Who said biochemistry at uni can't be applied to daily life :p
I never did bio Chemistry ... it used to clash with the Biology class and that was daily life , usually held at the rear of the school hall or the back seat of the school bus ..

I wish I had of done Bio chemisty .. then I wouldn't have thought you were describing the functions of a mobile phone,,,

I don't get AAPT either , Shocking phon ereception ! but national broad band is coming !

Hang on SKIP .. I'm a comin ;ol;

Scantar ..Stay safe
 
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