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Discussion Starter #1
Not getting any cold air during this incredibly hot S Florida summer. My retired Indy suggests it could be the recirculate door is not closing.

Is this a simple/easy fix... like WD 40 sprayed in the right place, or ... ?
 

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'04 9-5 Aero Wgn, '01 9-5 Aero, '90 C900
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Have you done the self diagnostic yet? Hold down the Auto and Off buttons, and the HVAC box will run through a self-test and display any error codes for you.
 

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Discussion Starter #4
Have you done the self diagnostic yet? Hold down the Auto and Off buttons, and the HVAC box will run through a self-test and display any error codes for you.
Thanks!

I had no clue what to do

Should the engine be running when I do this?
 

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'04 9-5 Aero Wgn, '01 9-5 Aero, '90 C900
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I usually have it running so the AC compressor is running while it self-tests.
 

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But even if the recirc flaps are stuck open, you should still get some cool air. Recirc re-cools the same air. Are you sure the compressor is engaging? and there's actually enough refrigerant in it?

With the fan at a high speed, you will hear the change in air noise as the recirc flaps open/close.
 

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Discussion Starter #8
Have you done the self diagnostic yet? Hold down the Auto and Off buttons, and the HVAC box will run through a self-test and display any error codes for you.
WOW. Just did it, and guess what? No reading, though I tried 3 times, BUT, I then pushed the on button and for the first time in a long time the fan speed was working properly, and it seemed to have cold air. I need to drive it to confirm.

THANK YOU
 

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Discussion Starter #9
Alas, the drive only proved the hot air is blowing harder as the fan is finally working. I probably did not have Recir engaged

Thanks Doug

Ill try your suggestions next.
 

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Discussion Starter #10
while Im here, should I replace my MAS airflow sensor? Never touched it during my 84K, and probably not done by prior owner
 

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Unless you have any suggestion that the MAS is going bad, I would not replace it as a "maintenance" item. Too expensive IMO ($90+ for a new one). So if it was me, I'd leave the old one in there until you get some indication that it is messing with you. I've had mine since new and now has 175k miles on it without any problems. If you got it off, you may want to clean it with MAS cleaning spray though.

On the AC situation, would follow Doug's advise on checking if the clutch is engaging and also check if you have enough refrigerant in the system (if low, compressor clutch will not engage and you will get hot air only). There are quite a few things that can go wrong with the AC system; anything from leaks, problems with the air recirculation or air distribution flaps, electrical issues, bad pressure switch to a failed compressor etc.. If you don't have manifold gauges, you may want to invest in a set. Harbor Freight sells them for $50-60 or rent a set for free at an automotive store. Knowing if you have refrigerant in there is a very good start and then refine troubleshooting from there.
 

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Discussion Starter #12
I tried it again with engine and recir both on. Kept both depressed beyond when 'off' showed in the window. Left side reads 0, right side nothing at all
 

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Discussion Starter #13
Unless you have any suggestion that the MAS is going bad, I would not replace it as a "maintenance" item. Too expensive IMO ($90+ for a new one). So if it was me, I'd leave the old one in there until you get some indication that it is messing with you. I've had mine since new and now has 175k miles on it without any problems. If you got it off, you may want to clean it with MAS cleaning spray though.

On the AC situation, would follow Doug's advise on checking if the clutch is engaging and also check if you have enough refrigerant in the system (if low, compressor clutch will not engage and you will get hot air only). There are quite a few things that can go wrong with the AC system; anything from leaks, problems with the air recirculation or air distribution flaps, electrical issues, bad pressure switch to a failed compressor etc.. If you don't have manifold gauges, you may want to invest in a set. Harbor Freight sells them for $50-60 or rent a set for free at an automotive store. Knowing if you have refrigerant in there is a very good start and then refine troubleshooting from there.
Thank you. I have no idea whether clutch is engaging or not. I will probably have to take it to a proper ac guy to sort out
 

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You can easily verify if the clutch is engaging or not without the use of any tools (well, a jack and a jack stand would be helpful). You just need to know where to look. From previous posts, I think you have a 4-cylinder 9-5 Wagon (...pardon me Estate). The compressor is located close to the ground and on the right-hand-side when looking at the serp belt set-up from the right-hand side of the car (thus, it is located at the bottom at the front of the car, passenger side). It is below the water-pump. You can see if from the top with the hood open but even easier to see from underneath if you have the car on a jack stand. I have attached an image of the compressor and pointed-out what the clutch is. There is a pulley, which is turned by the serpentine belt. The pulley will obviously always be running while the engine is running. But this does not mean that the compressor drive shaft is engage and allows the compressor to pump refrigerant around in the system and that the AC is working. You see the clutch in the middle of the pulley. When the AC is off, the clutch is not engaged and not spinning. When the AC is on, and calls for the temperature to be lowered inside the car, the clutch is magnetically (electromagnetically) pulled-in toward the pully and starts spinning. If you have the AC setting at very cold, the clutch will likely spin constantly. If you have warmer setting (say 78F, it will cycle and turn-on and off as required. It is when the clutch is pulled-into the pulley that the compressor drive shaft kicks-in and allows the AC to generate cold air. So, if the clutch is not pulled-in, the AC cycle will not work and you will have only ambient or hot air coming through your vents.

There are many reasons why the clutch may not be engaging and you will need additional tools and know-how to figure-it out. But you could just observe the clutch and see if it is working or not. Put the AC on LO and observe the clutch, If it is not engaging, there could be many reasons why not and your Indy will have to help you there, unless you want to get tools and start working on the AC yourself. But to do it, you really need to know how it works and operates as one could inflict damage to the system if not careful (overcharging it with refrigerant, for example).

A clutch that is not engaging could mean a lot of things and could be caused by:
  • low refrigerant (if there is a leak), there has to a certain pressure in the system for the clutch to engage
  • Failed compressor
  • Burnt Fuses/relays
  • shorted electrical wires
  • a failed pressure switch (if pressure is to high or to low, the clutch will not engage)
  • clogged expansion valve
  • etc.
Leaks are often caused by dried-out O-rings or a punctured condenser. Or a leaky evaporator.

As the possibilities for the clutch not working are many, it will take troubleshooting to get to root cause and to avoid throwing parts at it and guessing. This is why I suggested to invest in a set of manifold gauges, as they are very helpful in troubleshooting...but again requires knowledge how to use them and interpret the results. Google is your friend though, and you can learn a lot by just observing how-to videos on-line. But, I think I spoke too much and I leave that decision is up to you!

compressor_narked.jpg
 

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Discussion Starter #15
Wow

lol on Estate

Thank you for being so thorough with your explanation. I can observe the pulley by looking down under the hood, not sure I can also see the clutch though, as there is a lot of hardware in that area

Sounds like first thing is to make sure there is sufficient refrigerant, then start troubleshooting, which I will leave to the professionals
 

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Yes, can a bit of a pain to see the clutch from above. That's why it is much easer to get under the car to get a good look (at least for me). Yes, take it to a service station to first of all see that you have refrigerant in the system and take it from there. I think if you took it to a Valvoline Oil and Service station (or some place like that), they would probably check that for free. Best of luck. It is anny9ong being without air, especially where you live!.
 

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Discussion Starter #17 (Edited)
My neighbor lent me his A/C PRO Cold-Air Indicator. I just need to find a video to make sure I use it correctly.

Although I can see it, I can't tell whether the clutch is engaged.

Just did a check with the AC PRO gauge it registers 0, BUT i DID HEAR THE CLUTCH ENGAGE . My dumb *** connected the gauge PRIOR to starting the engine ac so when I connected it afterwards the seal on the guage popped. They are kind enough to send me a replacement, but 3-4 more days without AC.
 

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You need good lighting to see it. The light from a mobile phone won't do usually. It can be a bit tricky to see it from above as there is a lot of stuff that obscures the vision in that area, especially for an untrained eye. Why not just swing by a Valvoline Instant Oil Change place (I know they have them in FL too). They do some limited servicing on AC systems and they could verify if you have pressure in the system or not. Don't think they would even charge you to check that.
 

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Discussion Starter #19
You need good lighting to see it. The light from a mobile phone won't do usually. It can be a bit tricky to see it from above as there is a lot of stuff that obscures the vision in that area, especially for an untrained eye. Why not just swing by a Valvoline Instant Oil Change place (I know they have them in FL too). They do some limited servicing on AC systems and they could verify if you have pressure in the system or not. Don't think they would even charge you to check that.
Did you miss my post above yours? Waiting for replacement AC PRO to attempt charging
 

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Guess I missed it. If you're pressure truly is zero, the system is obviously empty. Either the compressor is kaput (seal busted), which could cause a rapid leak and the system would not hold pressure very long or you have a leak in some other component and it leaked-out over time. You will want to put refrigerant mixed with dye in the system so you can trace the leak once you fill enough to get the compressor to kick-in. Or you could fill the system with pressured air and then trace the leak with soapy water.
 
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