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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Ok so im rebuilding my engine have it all apart in process of cleaning everything. Getting the head skimmed and ordering parts in the next couple days. I want opinions on the best break in procedure for the engine other than staying off boost. My current plan for starting is using some oil thats called first start oil. You basically use it in place of regular oil for your first start then let it idle for 20 minutes then drain and change your oil filter then refill with whatever oil you plan on using and go from there. I was just wondering what everyone uses as "proper" break in procedures other than staying off boost. Also im aware of changing the oil and filter after the first 500 miles.
 

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Sound like aircraft engine break in. For reciprocating engines they run the first few hours a non detergent, non dispersal dino oil so that all moving parts can get properly seated. Then if you want to go to a synthetic, change it. I would also try to stay under 3500 including downshifts until the period is over. But someone who has done more engines than I may have better break in rules.
 

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Go ahead and boost all you want. High combustion chamber pressures are good for ring seating.
Don't overthink it, it doesn't make much difference. Race motors get broken in on their Dyno run.
 

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Go ahead and boost all you want. High combustion chamber pressures are good for ring seating.
Don't overthink it, it doesn't make much difference. Race motors get broken in on their Dyno run.
I like this,

certainly from what I've read and my dad's experience, doing a hard run in is better than the overly careful one that manufacturers recommend.

A guy did a test with aircraft engines, followed the manufacturers recommendations and then did one where he'd let the engine warm up then push it hard.

He pulled the 2 identical engines apart and the one that was casually run in had carbon all up the piston skirt as the rings hadn't bedded in well. The other one was completely clean, same oil same engine just different procedures.
 

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SAAB never recommended babying them.
I had a customer with a new (1988?) 900 ask me about his planned break-in procedure. He said he "wanted his car to last forever". His plan: change oil and filter at 100 miles, 500 miles, at the 1000 mile service, then every 1500 miles until he got to 5000 miles, never exceeding 1/2 throttle until 1k etc.
I told him to take that money and save it until the car had 80k on it, and his enthusiasm had waned some. The money would do more good then.
 

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For whats its worth ..

From a very young age I can recall my father talking about different examples of the model of cars his dealership employer worked on . ( absolute cream of the crop Marquee ) and how you could *tell* the owner by how the car performed .. and how often it came back in with *issues*

His logic was that the cars that were pushed ( not flogged) ALWAYS felt better , performed better . Those that had been pampered by fuddy duddy I want to make it last forever owners were invariable sluggish and problematic .

In my own experience , the same has been true . the most recent example is a bike I owned from new .. Rings were replaced at 100,000 K and I remember showing the Pot to my local dealer ..distributor (when sourcing parts ) who made the comment that it looked 100% on bikes he did rings on with under half the K's .
On a japanese 250 twin 4 stroke sewing machine .. .. 100 is a lot of K's .
 

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These medieval running-in procedures are handed down, father to son, that they eventually get taken as gospel. In the early days of car manufacture production and manufacturing techniques were often primitive compared to today and were probably required because things didn't fit very well and machined surfaces were comparatively rough. Modern cars don't need running-in. OK, don't cane it and don't labour the engine at low revs. Apart from changing the oil and filter at the first 1000 miles I don't bother. As someone said F1 cars are run in on the dyno at 10k, and they have to last few races with no loss of power.
 

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Agree with the above, my Charade turbo was rebuilt and the engine builder (proper engine rebuilders too) said to not the wring the life out of it and let it labour but to let it rev and drive it hard as it beds the rings in better.
Still runs a treat, turbo seals are going but that's another matter lol
 

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I would be somewhat wary of break-in oils, I mean it isn't new... only maybe a scratched-up cylinder bore and new ring that you put in there.

A lot of cars recommend low speeds and varying speeds, but I think that has more to do with differential / transmission break-in than the engine. FWIW some guys say to baby the engine, others say to floor it and wind it way out. One is more fun than the other :p
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
Thats exactly what I needed to know thanks for alll the info
 

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I put new rings on my fiancées Saab. I have 300 miles on it and have low oil on the dip stick. Have not really beat it. Trans has 175k on it. But, seems I am doing it wrong. So, I will have to give it hell. Hit 100 twice. Looks like its stop light to stop light.
 

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Go ahead and boost all you want. High combustion chamber pressures are good for ring seating.
Don't overthink it, it doesn't make much difference. Race motors get broken in on their Dyno run.
You're in the wrong forum but rings are rings.
Lugging is good, high rpm bad.
Check for leaks.
 

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as someone who works at a car dealership service facility where we DO replace engines as a short-block and assembly model....

just use synthetic oil at the very least for the first oil change (i recomend life) and then just haul *** around town whenever you can. have fun, the engine will break in fine. i never had a problem at hyundai where those motors drop like flies, and because of their 10 year, 100k powertrian warranty, always come back to the shop :lol:
 

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as someone who works at a car dealership service facility where we DO replace engines as a short-block and assembly model....

just use synthetic oil at the very least for the first oil change (i recomend life) and then just haul *** around town whenever you can. have fun, the engine will break in fine. i never had a problem at hyundai where those motors drop like flies, and because of their 10 year, 100k powertrian warranty, always come back to the shop :lol:
Roger that. First time rebuilding a engine to this extent feels good to hear it. Thanks.
 

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Roger that. First time rebuilding a engine to this extent feels good to hear it. Thanks.
couple things to adhere to.

assembly lube.
put that **** EVERYWHERE. can't use too much, only too little.
lucas makes a good formula in a small bottle that i've personally used on my vw's. made everything go great, and had a nice thick viscosity to it.
 

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couple things to adhere to.

assembly lube.
put that **** EVERYWHERE. can't use too much, only too little.
lucas makes a good formula in a small bottle that i've personally used on my vw's. made everything go great, and had a nice thick viscosity to it.
I use blue assembly lube and 105 grease. I used a lot. I see Luca makes a engine break-in oil. But I believe that its not recommended for our engine. Could be wrong.
 

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well, for automotive in current modern configurations, that kind of "break in oil" is not really needed. were this 50 years ago, sure. nowdays, with modern machining practices? has no place.
 
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