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Discussion Starter #1
I'm working on sorting out addressing issues in the rear suspension and am running into confusion when it comes to terminology. There seem to be about 5 different names for every part except maybe the subframe. The worst is that the WIS (at least the online version) appears to use a completely different terminology from parts places (esaab or eeuro). So, in the interest of simplicity I'm going to steal esaabparts' rear suspension diagram since all the parts are already numbered and start with their terminology:



  • 10: longitudinal link (esaab, wisonline), control arm (esaab)
  • 11: front longitudinal link bushing (forum), "bushing" (esaab)
  • 4: rear lower control arm (esaab), lateral arm (forum), lower transverse link? (wisonline)
  • 9: cross stay (esaab), upper lateral arm (forum), upper transverse link? (wisonline)
  • 12: bushing (esaab), rose bush? (forum), ????? (wisonline)
This started because I was trying to look at the WIS for how to remove/replace #12 after having been under the car on the lift earlier today and not being able to see them to visually inspect them for wear. The WIS has terms like "Ball joint, lower transverse link" as well as "Transverse link bush"; are either of those #12?

Sorry for being dense--I thought I understood things and then the WIS terminology confused me again.

FWIW, this is in a question to correct some rear camber issues and what I can only describe as "floatiness" during cornering. Current plan is to replace the #11 with the powerflex (inspection showed it dry-rotted) and at least the lower #12 on both sides. I was originally going to use spacers to correct ride height, but after taking measurements, the rear of my non-aero 2006 is sitting at right around 600mm on the left and 612mm on the right, with spec given at 620. I'm wondering if renewing these bushings might be enough to correct the negative camber.

Strangely, although the left rear ride height is lower, the alignment check I got today indicated the LR camber as -1.2deg, just 0.1deg out of spec range. OTOH, the RR camber measured by alignment is -2.0, almost a full degree off.
 

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Ball joint, lower transverse link does sound like one of the "rose bushes". Rose bush is a British term that's commonly used on the Vauxhall forums. One or more Vauxhalls share the rear suspension design with the 9-5. The design of the rear suspension is such that if it's lower than the factory specifications, then camber will be off. Replacing the bushings will help, but it can't completely fix it if your suspension isn't at the right height.
 

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The 1st step is to figure out ride height. My wagon was 25mm low. Put some spacers on the shocks. It is better now.
Don’t have anywhere near the ability to do 11. Hell, I can’t even see it
 

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Fixing the bushings alone was enough to make a noticable difference in the way my car looked. If you have worn out shocks / springs, it's not going to fix everything. The right answer is to do bushings and shocks / springs.

As far as bushings go, if you're going to do one, just go ahead and do them all. It's too much labor to not just knock it all out.
I ordered a tool from the UK on eBay for not that much money. Having done this job both with and without it, it makes it 10x easier.

You can swap out the lower control arms for adjustable ones to make sure you never have to worry about camber adjustment again. If you have Xenon headlights with leveling sensors, you'll have to find a way to secure the sensor to the new adjustable control arm. I used a P-bracket and the original link with a longer bolt.

I included alot of the info about the tool and specific bushing part numbers in that thread. I'd definitely go powerflex for that trailing arm bushing. (The big one that's the forward most bushing on the trailing arm)
 

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Discussion Starter #6
That link and writeup was really helpful. Thanks!

How worn were the inner bushings on yours? I wasn't planning on doing those this time around as it seems like they're less likely to get really worn.

I saw the tool you purchased from the UK on ebay and had actually looked at that same tool on ebay. There's also somebody else who's selling the tool AND a set of 4 rose bushes together. No indication of who made the bushes. But the saturn forums specifically linked to it.

I will do the shocks and correct ride height, but my non-sport ride height is about 600 on one side and 610 on the other (strangely, the lesser-sagged is the one with the worse negative camber). So, I was thinking that I should do all the bushings first, let it settle in a bit, then re-examine ride height and replace shocks and make height corrections after.

Powerflex is definitely the bushing of choice for the front.

Did you consider trying dry ice on the trailing arm to shrink the arm prior to pressing the bearings in/out?
 

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It seems like when the front trailing arm bushings fails, it allows the arm to twist a fair amount. That's probably what's causing the one side to look worse than the other. I can't see how the rose bushes would contribute much at all to camber issues when they fail. I wouldn't use no-name bushings that come with a tool. I used Nordic rose bushes on my 2000 9-5, and the boots were already cracking and looking pretty ratty after two years. The genuine Saab ones have come down in price quite a bit, and now they're priced about the same as a good aftermarket one. Hopefully that doesn't mean that Saab's using a cheaper supplier for the parts now.
 

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Discussion Starter #8
It seems like when the front trailing arm bushings fails, it allows the arm to twist a fair amount. That's probably what's causing the one side to look worse than the other. I can't see how the rose bushes would contribute much at all to camber issues when they fail.
Interesting observation. I've only seen pictures of the rose bushes, but it seems if they start to get sloppy, especially the lower, they would have the effect of lengthening the lower control/lateral arm. But maybe I misunderstand how that bush is constructed.

I wouldn't use no-name bushings that come with a tool. I used Nordic rose bushes on my 2000 9-5, and the boots were already cracking and looking pretty ratty after two years. The genuine Saab ones have come down in price quite a bit, and now they're priced about the same as a good aftermarket one. Hopefully that doesn't mean that Saab's using a cheaper supplier for the parts now.
esaab has the bushes at about $25 per, roughly on par with the lemforder. The place offers the tool alone, or will throw four bushings in for about 10 pounds more. I may hedge my bets and get both. IF the ones from the other side of the pond look dodgy, I'll just chalk that up to education, or keep for "insurance", or maybe for practicing the first install.
 
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