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Hopefully I've found the correct forum to post my thread. My '96 900 SE Turbo Convertible needs a brake job. I'm not a skilled mechanic, but I've done brake jobs on other cars many times. I did the Googling thing and looked at a few videos of various brake jobs on Saabs, then pulled the rear wheel and saw something completely different than anything I had seen online.

First, the brake line was solid, not flexible like most, so it would appear that the line needs to come off to remove the caliper...correct? Next, though my car is a relatively low mileage car for its age, the caliper, the clips, the pins, etc, seem to be a rusty mess. Would it be best to just replace them, or can they generallu be cleaned up? Just looking for any input, guidance that the community may be able to offer in terms of instructions, thoughts.

Thanks!
 

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With the beam axle and a dual piston fixed caliper there is no need for a flexible line at the caliper (the axle, mounting bracket and caliper don't move independently of each other at all, there is a flexible hose near the pivot point of the axle to allow to move).

Should be no need to remove the brake line:
1. There is enough give in the line that you can move the caliper the small amount to get the rotor off.
2. If you are really concerned you can unclip the hard line from the axle and then move the hard line and caliper to the side has one piece utilizing the flexible nature of the rubber hose further up.

As long as the pistons in them aren't seized you should be able to reuse the calipers, you may want to invest in a file, they tend to rust in the openings where the pads go impeding the free movement of the pads.
Because they are fixed (and only move internally) they are pretty prone to rusting badly on the outside, but normally its just cosmetic.
 

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It depends on why you need a brake job.

First of all, the bleeder screws may be frozen. If you snap those off, you are stuck with either replacing the calipers, or driving with the existing brake fluid and never ever opening up the brake lines. (I'm in the latter category.)

But, if you are planning to keep the car on the road for more than a year, you probably want to change the brake fluid. In that case, spray the bleeder screws with a good penetrating oil (Kroil or PB Blaster or similar) and see if you can loosen the bleeders. If they snap, well there you go.

Also you want to make sure that the pads are moving and are not sticking off or on. The condition of the rotors will tell you a bunch. You can also pry back the pads on each side and pump the brakes a couple of times. After you release the brakes, the pads should then be up against the rotors but not clamp them.

Replacement calipers are relatively expensive. :confused:

If the calipers seem servicable, then the only reason to pull them off is to replace the rotor. You don't have to disconnect the brake line--there's enough give. I typically rest them on a toolbox. Clean out the channels where the pads sit. They're typically full of rusty crud, and might require filing smooth.

If replacing the rotor, make sure you don't get anti-seize or anything on the inside of the hat. It's easy to put too much on the hub face. which will then smear on the hat surfaces when you put the rotor on.
 

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I almost always have replaced the rear brakes. They are used "less" than the fronts and they stick if the car hasn't been driven in a while.

I've used rebuilt calipers and have had no problems with them.

I did have one car that I broke off one of the bolts holding the caliper on. Ended up driving it do the mechanic with a vice grips 'plugging' the brake line.

Rotors, I have both replaced them and resurfaced them. Again, I only get affordable rotors and they have had no problems. Saves the time of finding someone who still resurfaces rotors.

With the money you save doing them yourselves take the car to a mechanic and have them flush and bleed the brake lines.

The whole job itself is easy.
 
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