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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Going to install new pads and sliders for the rear brakes.

1. Do I need any special tools for getting the calipers off?

2. Any special tools for getting the pins/sliders off?

3. How does the caliper piston get re-seated? Do I just use a "C" clamp, or is it threaded and needs to be turned a certain direction to make room for the new pads?

I bought the pin/sliders kit from Auto Zone which also have the spring thing included.
 

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Getting the pins out is easy with a mallet and a punch. I left the calipers on the disk and pressed the cylinders back in with the well padded handles of my pliers.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
OK, I've got all the tools covered ;ol; Didn't want to jump into to find out a specialty tool was needed to continue. Didn't realize the 9-5's were similar, as I have that site bookmarked for odds ans ends stuff. Thanks guys.
 

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if the piston is in good condition you can do it by hand. i usually use a wood clamp, the ones that come with soft rubber pads.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
I was able to get the one side done before it got dark. I used the "C" clamp on both pistons and they went back in very easily. Unfortunately I had to remove the metal backings from both pads to get them to fit as it was too tight a fit otherwise. Even knocking the rust off wasn't enough. I used synthetic brake grease where they make contact with the piston though. Figure I'll drive 100 miles or so and see if I can get them on then as there's literally no way for the pads to fit otherwise. And I'm referring to the metal backing that's clipped on, and roughly 1/64" thickness. BOTH old pads were literally separated from their respective backings as the rivets were sheared off!! The upper spring perch was a joke as nothing was left with that either.

How do you adjust the e-brake with the rotor on? I tried looking through the hole and rotated the rotor, but the hole never aligned with anything that look adjustable to me. Is there supposed to be a cogged wheel that gets adjusted or something?

Are there any bolt-on calipers of a better design that are a direct swap? Not crazy about the solid, non-vented rotor either.
 

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The cogged wheel for adjusting the handbrake is at the 6 o'clock position on the hub, I'm not sure if it can be accessed through a hole in the rotor, I have always done it with the rotor off.

Calipers from a 02-05 9-5 Aero/Arc will fit and accommodate the vented rear rotors they come with, they will bolt right on, but you will need some special lines since the the points where the line enters the calipers is significantly different.
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
The cogged wheel for adjusting the handbrake is at the 6 o'clock position on the hub, I'm not sure if it can be accessed through a hole in the rotor, I have always done it with the rotor off.

Calipers from a 02-05 9-5 Aero/Arc will fit and accommodate the vented rear rotors they come with, they will bolt right on, but you will need some special lines since the the points where the line enters the calipers is significantly different.
Is there a junction somewhere in between where the brake line enters the caliper in the rear and enters the master cylinder? I really haven't spent that much time under the car to be honest. I was very surprised to see a hard line entering the caliper though. Most cars have a rubber line which permits movement of the caliper once it's unbolted. Are there adapters to jump-size the threads to the 02-05 9-5? Otherwise I'm asking about a junction as it'd be the next sensible spot to convert to the later style brake line at the junction, then run the 02-05 9-5 lines from the junction to the calipers as the hard/soft lines should either be the same there or easier to attach an adapter.
 

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Hard lines run from the master cylinder to the ABS module, hard lines then run under the car to just above the beam of the rear axle, rubber lines then run to the beam of the rear axle and then hard lines along the legs of the beam axle.

The lines you replace are that last section of hard line, in theory you could rebend your existing hard lines, but that wouldn't be my choice, since the rear suspension is different you can use the ones from the 9-5. If you wanted you could custom bend some hard lines, but since the replacement lines are pretty cheap it's not worth the effort imo.
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
Yeah, that last stretch of lines by the rear axle sounds like the best spot for a tie in. If i ever get the extra 100 HP I'd like to put to the wheels, I'll definitely consider that swap. As it stands now with the couple hundred pound diet I stuck the car on, the backs should suffice until the HP bump. Thanks for the tips ;ol;
 

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Are there any bolt-on calipers of a better design that are a direct swap? Not crazy about the solid, non-vented rotor either.
What do you feel is an issue with twin piston calipers, without going to 4 pot calipers there is no 'better' design, the front 'floating' calipers are far inferior! As for the solid discs I'd really not bother, its thr front brakes that do most of the work
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
What do you feel is an issue with twin piston calipers, without going to 4 pot calipers there is no 'better' design, the front 'floating' calipers are far inferior! As for the solid discs I'd really not bother, its thr front brakes that do most of the work
I'd rather have vented rotors all around. Heavier vehicles have vented front/rear for a reason. I understand the fronts handle a big % of the stopping, but the rears still come into the equation and solid rotors will hold the heat longer and won't be as effective if multiple braking after fast speeds. Twin piston might be "superior", but these brakes on my 9-3 were literally falling apart. The pads separated from the backings, and the spring perch was basically disintegrated, and both pins were rusted. Even trying to back out the pins with a punch caused the ends to start mushrooming as it's a soft metal. There's also not much surface area with the pads which surprised me when I 1st saw them.
 

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I'd rather have vented rotors all around. Heavier vehicles have vented front/rear for a reason. I understand the fronts handle a big % of the stopping, but the rears still come into the equation and solid rotors will hold the heat longer and won't be as effective if multiple braking after fast speeds. Twin piston might be "superior", but these brakes on my 9-3 were literally falling apart. The pads separated from the backings, and the spring perch was basically disintegrated, and both pins were rusted. Even trying to back out the pins with a punch caused the ends to start mushrooming as it's a soft metal. There's also not much surface area with the pads which surprised me when I 1st saw them.
Rear brakes don't do a lot of work, hence they are seldom vented on any car this side of a porsche even my old S2 Quattro Coupe Turbo had solid rear discs, you won't find may upgrades for the rears for this reason. The state of your rear brakes is not uncommon, they are quiet possibly the originals as they do little work they last a lot longer than the fronts so its possible you are the first to have had them apart, if not it would have been long ago if anyone has had them in bits. The rust is down to that more than any deficiency in the design. Porper calipers have a pistons each side of the disc, look at any F1 car they are just the same (but more pistsins!) you won't find crappy floating calipers on any true race car. There is no point in vented rear discs, the solid discs can disapate heat more than fast enough for the work are asked to do. Untill you have some seriorus brakes on the front I'd leave the rears stock apart from using decent quilty parts..
 

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I think Nick T would beg to differ on if there is a significant difference from larger and vented rear rotors (and the calipers to accommodate them). Rumor is that they make a noticeable difference with the stability of the rear of the car when stopping from high speed. The Aero 9-5 came with vented rears as standard, that was one the highest horsepower Saabs available at the time and about on par with a Stage 3 ng900/og9-3. Well the 9-5 is a heavier car it is never a bad idea to have the best brakes possible.
 

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Yes, rear discs do make a diifeance to the stability. So much so in the days before ABS most european cars had a valve to turn them off under heavy braking as they tended to lock up before thre front ones! It was normally a simple valve attached to the axle that as it loaded up would close off the rear brake circuit. It was only to stop the rear wheels locking before the fronts. It's probably an FWD thing as the rear wheels are so lightly loaded at the rear
 

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Yes obviously I wouldn't upgrade the rears without doing the fronts to maintain balance, just saying there is an option for rears and it does make a difference.
I don't know that upgrading the rears without doing the fronts would necessarily be a problem.

If we make the assumption that the brakes on both ends are currently than adequate to generate the stopping force necessary to stop the car, then the proportional load on the front brakes is determined by load physics and will not change. Only if the rear brakes are maxing out right now and the fronts are picking up that load would upgrading them apply more force to the rear. Or, if the rears heat up with the current design and loose effectiveness, then the fronts would have a larger load and cooler/vented rears would at least prevent them from losing stopping power - but I can't see that as a handling issue unless one of those conditions is true - and even then, they'd just be returning to design characteristics and failing to fail so that the rears would do their job.

You could also note that a larger rotor and pads will not apply more force than the smaller one if the same hydraulic pressure is applied - the force will just be displaced over a larger area (that might help with heat, see above).

If you tromp on the pedal harder, you would get more force and both ends of the car and the fronts might heat up and exceed capacity, allowing the (now) larger rears to pick up some additional stopping power, and thereby changing characteristics somewhat.

All theory, dissenting opinions invited.
 

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You are right Bob, probably wouldn't be a problem, just not the best use of resources. Point still applies, do the front's first and then worry about the rears.
Absolutely agree.

Since all you really need for the fronts are a set of 9-5 caliper carriers and a set of pads and rotors that you'd be buying for a brake job, it almost seems like a no-brainer to do the front.

Anyone know what specific 9-5 years work for this? Is it any OG 9-5? Specific models?
 
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