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Discussion Starter #1
Anyone replaced theirs? I saw some old posts suggesting "cut the old ones out" but I could use more instruction. Can you route a hacksaw blade through the bushing to do the cutting? Or is there some other method? Maybe press it out with a C-clamp?

Oh... and how much does the rear axle weigh? Is this a strictly out of car operation or can I pull it off by just dropping the axle onto supports?
 

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I replaced mine some number of years ago. I did it pretty much exactly like you're thinking of, by pressing the centers out with a vice, and then I cut the rest out with a hacksaw. I remember going through a couple of blades because they got so gunked up with rubber. I didn't remove the entire axle from the car because I didn't want to mess with the brake lines any more than I had to. If I had to do it again, I might take it all off, though. I just unbolted the shocks, unclipped or unbolted what I could from the brake lines, and then unbolted the axle from the body and lowered it down as much as I could on a small trolley jack or two. I used ProParts poly bushings, which still seem to be fine, quite a few years later.
 

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2000 9-3 Aero 5d
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Just checking - this is different from the bushings associated with rear sway bar, isn't it?
The specs suggest the bushings are supplied with the shock absorbers. (eg part number 4373874).
But Bob and Jeremy - you're talking about these bushings ( 4467791) - Is that correct?
Jeremy - Can you remember what kind of mileage you had when you replaced them?
Side note:
I found the hexagon screws (the ones with the side cut) are getting hard to find.
If I remember what my rear Koni's looked like - I think they had a bushing 'built-in'.
 

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There are no bushings on the rear sway bar. It's bolted right onto the axle. The bushing part number you have is the one that's at the bottom of the shock absorber. I can't imagine anyone would ever replace that because shocks come with it. It would be cheaper and easier to just replace the shock absorber. My car had somewhere around 150K miles on it when I replaced the bushings, but they didn't need to be replaced. They were still in good shape. I was trying to tighten up the rear end more than anything. It did feel a little more solid, but also slightly noisier and less compliant over bumps.
 

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Good to know that mileage point.
A little off-topic - So that rubber damper 4249272 that is shown on the rear suspension diagram isn't a major thing because the bar is bolted - As opposed to the ones on the front that are 'more' important? Is my understanding here correct?
 

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That lower bushing is just how the shock absorber mounts to the axle. It doesn't have anything to do with the sway bar. The front sway bar pivots or twists in a pair of bushings, but the rear one works completely differently because the rear is a twist beam axle, not independent suspension. It's just there to add stiffness to the axle. The front bar attempts to keep two separate struts from being quite so independent.
 

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Discussion Starter #7 (Edited)
Mort: The bushings I am looking at replacing are 4467791. They locate the rear axle. My toe is at the limits on the rear axle on both sides in opposite directions... in other words, I think the bushings are worn and it's twisting a little to one side causing the toe to be more positive on one side and more negative on the other. (Note that if it were off with too much positive toe on both sides or too much negative on both sides, that would probably not be bushings... the axle itself/hub mounts would be off.).

If your alignment doesn't show the toe to be off, and in a way that worn bushings could cause, I would not bother replacing them. This looks like a PITA jpb to do. MHO.
 

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Whoops, I meant a c-clamp. :) I think I probably also used a deep socket with the clamp to do the actual pushing.
 

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Discussion Starter #10
I'll assume it wasn't possible to actually push the bushing itself out with the c-clamp? I'm guessing you'd need a very large socket for the receiving end, or maybe a pipe if the diameters match up. Are these things in there super tight?
 

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I don't remember exactly how I set up the receiving end, but I think I might have used one of the receiving tubes from a press kit that Autozone rents. A piece of pipe would work just as well. I'm not sure that there's a socket big enough to do the job in my 3/4" drive kit. They're very tight, from what I remember.
 

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Discussion Starter #13
Actually, I already have some of those in there. They work well for camber. You want -1.0 to -1.1 negative camber. Makes the car feel much better controlled and stops inner rear tire wear.

If you're going to do it, you'll need at least two alignments: Before, after, and then maybe again. If there's a place near you that has a "lifetime" package that's the way to go.

I highly recommend that you read the instructions first from GS (there's a lot of 9-5 stuff in there you can ignore... I have written that up somewhere) ... then jack the car, loosen the hub nuts, blow out the area, and retorque them. No shims the first time, just loosen, clean, retorque. Then go get the alignment checked. Follow up by shimming and rechecking alignment. I think if I'd done that, I could have eliminated a second round of re-adjusting the shims and getting checked again.

OTOH, if you've already had it checked and know it's out, then just move to estimating shims and installing.
 

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I don't have any shims in mine, but my car needs an alignment since I replaced the inner tie rod bushings and the steering wheel is now off-center. Bob, I'll have to take your advice and remove and blow out the dirt behind the rear hubs before taking it in, and then I can see how everything measures up.
 

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Discussion Starter #15
Yeah, I think it's actually the un-torque/re-torque that does it... but it wouldn't do to have anything sneak in between.

FYI - If you get your alignment (toe) done and it still tracks with the steering wheel unlevel, I have a post that describes how to fix that. I always end up correcting mine... alignment guys never level the wheel.
 

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I've replaced the rear axle bushings on a couple 9-3's. It's a pain in the butt no matter how you do it, but quite rewarding once it's done. The methods listed above work. Tips: (1) Do it with the axle removed. (2) Have an extra set of hands for lining-up the axle when re-installing. (3) I had good luck using a torch. Heat up the axle, wait for profuse smoke, and somehow twisted and pulled the old bushing out. (4) Clean things up good and use lube when putting the new bushings in.
 

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Discussion Starter #17
rjm: Thanks for the tip.

I will have trouble with burning the bushing out... living where acrid smoke will be a real issue. Probably can't go that route.
 

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set up a barbecue grill in the parking lot next to the car with lots of smoke, greasy burgers, the smoke and smell will mask the fact that your torching out the bushings, bon appetit
 
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